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October 10, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Thursday, October 10, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PTe

VVIU, #,I#accs

3

FOLLOWS CONGRESSIONAL CUE:

!I

LB J

orders

US-Israeli

Astronauts ready
for Apollo flght

negotiations on

From Wire Service Reports
WASHINGTON - Responding
to a congressional call for sales
of U.S. jets to Israel, President
Johnson told Secretary of State
Dean Rusk yesterday to start ne-
gotiations with the Israeli gov-
ernment.
Both Democratic presidential
nominee Hubert H. Humphrey
and Republican nominee Richard
M. Nixon have advocated pro-
viding supersonic war planes to
the Israelis.
In addition, ,American Inde-
pendent party candidate George
C. Wallace earlier this week call-
ed for the U.S. to "join with oth-
er nations of the free world in
providing sufficient arms and
equipment to Israel to maintain

a balance of force in (the Middle'
East)."
Congress has passed an aid
bill provision for such action ifj
deemed necessary for Israel's de-
fense.
Johnson made no mention of the
U.S. political campaign in a
statement issued as he signed the
aid measure yesterday --: but he
made note of the proviso favor-
ing the supersonic jets for Israel.
"In the light of this expression
of the sense of the Congress,"
Johnson said, "I am asking the
secretary of state to initiate ne-
gotiations with the government
of Israel and to report back to
me.
The provision in the $1.97 bil-
lion aid authorization bill says:

jet sales'
"It is the sense of Congress
that the -President should take
such steps as may be necessary,
as soon as practicable after the
date of enactment of this sec-
tion, to negotiate an agreement
with the government of Israel
providing for the sale by the
United States of such- number
of supersonic planes as may be
necessary to provide Israel with
an adequate deterrent force ca-
pable of preventing future Arab
aggression by offsetting sophis-
ticated weapons received by the
Arab states and to replace loss-
es suffered by Israel in the 19
67 conflict."
Israel smashed most of the air
power of her Arab enemies in her
lightning victory in June of 1967.
But since then the Soviets have
re-outfitted the air forces of their
Arab allies with more modern
planes. Egypt is now reported to
have some 400 war planes, com-
pared with Israel's 270.
The Israelis for about a year
have made plain their desire to
buy the advanced U.S. jets. Pre-
mier Levi Eshkol pressed the re-
quest again during his visit with
Johnson here last January.
However, U.S. policymakers
preferred to go slow in meeting
Israel's plea, since the United
States is trying to hold down the
Middle East arms race.
I~i

Thieu s
attempt
arrests

tops
in

CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. OIP)-
A mammoth Saturn 5 rocket
that may hurl men around the
moon in December rolled to its
launch pad yesterday as pre-
parations moved flawlessly to-
ward tomorrow's launching of
the three Apollo 7 astronauts
on an earth orbit voyage.
With the Apollo 8 spaceship
perched on top, the 363-foot
rocket made the eight-hour,

3.5-mile trip to iaunch pad in
an upright position aboard a
huge tractor-like transporter
called a crawler.
The Apollo 8 crew - Air
Force Col. Frank Bowman, Na-
vy Capt. James A. Lovell, Jr..
and Air Force Maj. William A.
Anders - were among those
planning to witness the roll-
out.
. The astronauts' hopes of
flying Apollo 8, into orbit
around the moon depend on
tomorrow's results of Apollo 7,
which is scheduled to ride a
smaller Saturn 1B rocket into
earth orbit at 11 a.m. EDT
tomorrow.
Navy Capt. Walter M. Schir-
ra, Jr., Air Force Maj. Donn
F. Eisele and civilian astronaut
Walter Cunningham are to
check out all spacecraft sys-
tems as they race around the
globe for 11 days in the Apol-
lo 7 ship
If they demonstrate conclu-
sively that the Apollo craft can
safely carry men a quarter-of-
a-million miles to the moon
and bring them back,; the Bor-
man crew plans to take off
Dec. 20 on an eight-day trip
in which they are to orbit thie
moon 10 times during a 24,
hour period. That flight would
be a critical rehearsal for a
manned lunar landing in 1969.
If the Apollo 7 uncovers
flaws in the hardware, Apollo
8 will be scheduled as an
earthorbit mission to work
out the bugs.

coup
aigon;

II

m...... .

FREE!,
Entertainm ent,
Little Club with the
John Higgins Quintet,
OCTOBER 11th

i
e
t i
i
1

'P MarshallKy Pr

-~--

Saturn I lifts of f

I

9-12 P.M. at Michigan Lea

gue

_ __

I

ill

CINEMA II

CHANGE IN SCHEDULE
THIS WEEK, OCTOBER 11th and 12th
"TREASURE OF
SIERRA MADRE"
H. BOGART
("Cincinnati Kid" will be shown Oct. 25th and 26th)
Friday &' Satur-day Aud. A 75c 7:00 ' 9:00

"PEST-
A Liberal View"
Speaking-ROBERT W. CARR
co-founder of the Washtenaw 1421 Hill St.
Democrats for McCarthy 8 30 P.M.
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
Barry O'Neil and Roger Renwick
singing traditional folk music from Gritain, Ireland,
and Canada, accompanied by guitar, banjo, dulci-
mer, and concertina.

Goill'_
Thursday and Friday
BED AND
SOFA
Dir., Abram Room, 1929
Famous Russian comedyj
about housing shortage
with experiment in in-
ter-play of masculine
and feminine roles.
"This is a picture I've
waited years to see."
-Ed Weber
7:00,&9:05 P.M.
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM,

RECORD SESSION:
Houses pass(
waiving ecjw
WASHINGTON ( P)-The .House passed
cilitate television and radio debates betw
candidates. The action followed a continuou
part of which members were locked in thei
The time bill, would allow the broadcast
the joint appearance of major candidates wi
to numerous minor party seekers for the p
The lockup procedure, voted for the firs
helped break a delaying campaign waged by
Democrats charged harassing tactics
night-and-day grind because the GOP was
- publican

reporte~d
SAIGON A' A coup attempt
against President Nguyen Van
Thieu's government was foiled and
mass arrests of ranking South
Vietnamese officers are expected,
a high government source said
yesterday.
The source said details of the
attempted overthrow were fuzzy.
It was not "yet known w ho, was
behind it. The report that several
marine officers were arrested
could indicate that Lt. Colonel Li
Ngyuen Khang, the marine com-
mander who is a political ally of
Vice President Nguyen Cao Ky,
might have been involved. Ky is
the president's political rival.
But a source close to Khang said
he knew of no arrests and denied
knowledge of any coup attempt.
r An official spokesman for Thieu
also denied knowledge of any coup
esident Thieu attempt, althoughghe admitted
the government had placed South
Vietnam's armed forces on full
alert. The U.S. Embassy also said
it had no information about an
Jell abortive coup.
p b ill The source, who is in a position
~'tY .7UEff.'to know, told the Associated Press
several Vietnamese majors and
" colonels had already been arrested.
(t"You can expect a lot of people
to be arrested in the next few
days as a result of they coup at-
yesterday a bill to fa- tempt that failed," he said.
ween major presidential The source reported that t h e
s 27-hour session during coup was thwarted Tuesday night.
r chamber. - If true, it was the first attempt
ting networks to arrange to overthrow Thieu's government
ithout giving equal timesince he came into power in Octo-
iho iid ng qultieber. 1967.f
residency. After the overthrow of President
t time in a half-century, Ngo 'Dinh Diem on Nov. 1, 1963,
y Republicans. a series of power shifts, most of
were used during the them coups, paraded one govern-
bent on protecting Re- ment after another to leadership
Richard M. Nixon from in Saigon.
Democrat Hubert H. Before Thieu became president,
y andd.American-Inde- there were at least six bloodless
t candidate George C. coups 'and at least five attempted
coups.
icans denied the charge Since attaining office; Thieu has
their actions were de- consolidated his power, mostly at
get the House to vote the expense of Ky ands his sup-
on reform and congress- porters. In one such move, he
rganizatiop. stripped Khang of his posts as
ouse bill differs from a commander of the 3rd Corps and
assed measure in that it the Saigon military forces earlier
as major candidates this year, reportedly because he
e President Hubert 'H. feared a coup.
y, Democrat, former Khang has retained command
ident Richard M. Nixon, of the South Vietnamese marines,
in, and former Alabama but it was thought that Thieu
)rge C. Wallace, Ameri- would take that away eventually.
pendent Party. South Vietnamese military and
nate version would mere- civilian spokesmen who announc-
d the law, -thus permit- ed a military alert before reports
networks to invite whom of the coup'attempt became gen-
t to appear. eral knowledge, said they did not
sly, Nixon has said he know the reasons for the alert.

I

I

r

I

COUZENS HALL

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
F RI1DAY, OCT. 11
Noon Luncheon 25c
PROF. GEORGE L. GRASSMUCK
Assistant Vice President
International Program
"Issues in Higher Education
and the Campus"
Friday evening 6 P.M.
GUILD DINNER (at cost)
For Reservations Call 662-5189

Peru's rebels
sieze refinery
LIMA, Peru (AP)-Peru's revolu-
tkonary military government con-
fiscated the $200-million oil field,
refinery and related property of
the International Petroleum Corp.
Wednesday.
The corporation is a subsidiary
of Standard Oil of New Jersey.
Expropriation and nationaliza-
tion of the property, the c oun-
try's major petroleum complex,
climaxed years of dispute.
The action is certain to have.
repercussions in Washington and
affect the scope of Peruvian-
American relations. It will ad-
versely affect the climate for
foreign invegtment, badly needed
by Peru..

debating
Humphre
dependent
Wallace.
Republi
and said
signed to
on electio
ional rem
The Hi
Senate-pa
considers
only Vice
Humphre
Vice Pres
Republica
Gov. Geo
can Index
The Se
ly suspen
ting ther
they wan
Previou
would be
phrey bu
cluded.

ALL CAMPUS MIXER

662-8871

15c

witting to debate Hum-
t not with Wallace in-

Fri., Oct. 11

9-12

Rent your
Roommate with
a Classified Ad

__
- -- - - ;
----- -

I

GUYS 25c

GIRLS FREE

IV
Annual

BOGIE

Phone 434-0130
e /
EANOx. C.ARNTER ROAD
' AND'...

With strob lights and

Russ Gibb
presents in Detroit

THE CORNER
DRUGSTORE"
(former "Bushmen")Y

JOHN MAYALL
and
THE
PSYCHEDELIC STOOGES

Luis 'Bun ueA
c asteriece
of Erotica!'

FILM FESTIVAL
at
FRI. "Caine Mutiny" "Petrified Forest" 8:00 P.M.
SAT. "Key Largo" "Dark Passage" $1.00
SUN. "Sahara' "To Have and Have Not" at the door

I

I

OCTOBER 11, 12, and 13

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRiNG QU(CK RESULTS

RUSS GIBB
presents in
Detroit

Grande Ballroom
Grand River at Beverly,
one block south of Joy

"HAMLET"

FINAL PERFORMANCES
NOW THRU SUNDAY

BIG BROTHER

8:30 P.M.

Admission-$3.50

and
THE
HOLDING COMPANY

Call 834-4904

'

with
JANIS JOPLIN

One Nith Only
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15
GRANDE BALLROOM

Students For McCarthy Present
TITICUT FOLLIES
The Famous Documentary Filmed in a
Massachusetts Mental Hospital
Shown for the First Time in Michigan

ALLIED ARTISTS
piesents
BELLE
dEE
JOUR

w. it.!
*. " I j By
.,NAIftN Sean

11 r -. % -I* 1 -g-. -1 n

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