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October 09, 1968 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-09

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Page Ten

THE Mir HIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 9, 1968

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, October 9, 1968

Auditor withdraws
criticism of funding

WELL ARMED, FINANCED:
Arab guerillas vow to create
id-eas Vietnam in Israel
AMMAN, Jordan (A)-Guerrilla mightiest army on earth, how The commandos have Soviet-
fighters speak confidently of much more can we do against an made machine guns, mortars and
turning Israel into another Viet- Israeli army of 200,000 men? basookas, all supposedly bought for

discount records,
OKAY FOLKS
HERE THEY ARE!

1235 S. University
300 S. State

(Continued from page 1)
legislative consideration while re-
viewing rthe University appropri-
ations requests."
University President Robben W.
Fleming said Lee's statement had
implied that gifts to the Univer-
sity should be used to reduce the
amount of state appropriations
to the University. For the Legis-
lature to do so, Fleming said last
February, "would extinguish un-
restricted gifts because there
would be absolutely no incentive
to a donor to provide money in
lieu of State support."
In the current version of the
report, Lee toned down his rec-
ommendations, asking simply that
"unrestricted gifts and the inte-
rest therefrom, be reported in
the annual appropriation request.
However, Vice President . and
Chief Financial Officer Wilbur
K. Pierpont yesterday j-,Ainted out
that the University had started
reporting gifts in its budget re-
quests two years ago. The Uni-
versity's budget appropriations
requests for the '67-'68 fiscal year,
which were prepared in September
of 1966, list all of the $12.3 million
Worktsl, o
P i
enlarg esn ,
Voice split
(continued from page 1)
almost unanimously, to take part
in sponsoring a Nov. 4 teach-in
on the national elections. The
group also called for a student
strike on Election Day, Nov. 5.
A report from a committee es-
tablished last week to attempt to
abolish language and distribution
requirements in the literary col-
lege indicated that over 400 LSA
undergrads have already signed a
petition demanding the require-
ments' abolition. The petition be-
gan circulating Monday from a
table set up in the Fishbowl.
The membership also elected
permanent officers. Named chair-
man was Paul Gingrich, Grad.
Julia Wrigley, '71, was elected sec-
retary, and Mike Buckley, '69, was
voted tresasure. Delegates elected
to attend next weekend's SDS
National Council in Boulder, Colo.,
were Tom Lee, '72 Diana Oughton,
and Py Bateman, Grad.
Debate politics
A debate on "Working with the
Democratic Party or Engaging in
Independent Political Action" will
be held at 8 p.m. tonight in 3RS
of the Union. Panel members will
be Jerome Dupont, David Man-
gan, Eric Chester and Carol Sha-
lita

in gifts received by the University
for the fiscal year ending June,
1966.
Although University administra-
tors were pleased with the Lee's
about-face in these two areas,
they must still face the other
criticism leveled in the report.
Most important of these is the
recommendation that the Legis-
lature adopt guidelines for the
expenditure of student fees.
"If the Legislature were to say
what student fees could be used
for, it would be a serious problem
for the Regents asfar as their
authority to run the University
goes," explained Pie'rpont.
Regent Otis M. Smith, Auditor
General from 1959-1961, last night
,concurred with Pierpont. "I think
the proposal poses a serious con-
stitutional problem," he said.
Smith emphasized, however,
that he was quite happy to have
the audit of the University. "Con-
structive criticism makes you look
carefully at what you're doing,"
he said. "If we can't defend our
policies, maybe we shouldn't have
them."
Smith defended the authority of
the Regents to determine the way
student fees are spent. "The dele-
gation of authority to the Regents
to run the University was done to
provide insulation for the acade-
mic community from the fluctu-
ations of the will of the people
and the Legislature."
He also pointed out that the
woirding of Lee's recommendation,
emhszstewr rsltoin calling for state action in set-
ting up guidelines.
"Resolutions have no legal bind-
ing force on the University,"
Smith said, "but are advice from
the Legislature. They are certainly
well within their rights to advise
us on how we spend our money."

9

I

nam even if it takes 20 years. "The Viet Cong began just asE
They claim to represent the ob- we are. It took them 20 years to
jective of a restored Palestine in beat the French and fight the
the area that is now Israel, and Americans to a standstill. We are
some of them at least seem im- prepared to fight just as long."

pelltd by a fanaticism spawned in
the loss of a homeland. They re-
ject in advance any Middle East
settlement that provides fbr the
continued existence of the Jewish-
led state.
The best available information
indicates that the guerrillas are
currently about 3,000 strong, with
no shortage of recruits or money
to buy weapons.
Jordan officials describe them
as a problem for the Arab gov-
ernments. Leaders of Al Fatah,
most effective of several guerrilla
organizations, argue that the Arab
people would overthrow any Arab
government within 24 hours if it
began peace talks with Israel.
Most guerrilla camps are in
Jordan.
"Let King Hussein raise a finger
to begin negotiations and we will
cut it off," threatened one Al
Fatah member. "The king would,
like to talk peace with the Jews
but he knows he cannot."
STRENGTH INCREASES
If it came to a showdown, Jor-
dan's army, by striking hard and
fast, might be strong enough to
overcome guerrilla resistance. But
every week the guerrillas seem to
become stronger, in numbers, ef-
ficiency and firepower.
The guerrillas harbor no hopes
of a quick victory over the Israelis
and an Al Fatah spokesman re-
ported boys of 9 and 10 are being
trained to carry on in the years
ahead.

'LIBERATE' PALESTINE
Al Fatah contends that Pales-
tine was stolen from Arab owners
and that the Jewish state has no
right to exist. The movement's
political spokesman said Al Fa- k
tah's sole intent is to "liberate"
Palestine with all other political
questions in abeyance until that
is achieved.
Jews who lived in Palestine be-
fore 1948, when Israel was born,
would be permitted to remain.
Those who arrived since then
would be expelled, he said.
Al Fatah is believed to have
ample funds, mainly from private
K u w a i t i and Sandi Arabian
sources. Some of the other organ-
izations receive money from Arab
governments.

cash.
Qualified observers are skepii-
cal of Al Fatah claims that the
guerrillas carry on their fight
from the occupied west bank of
the Jordan River, with only train-
ing and supply bases sited in Jor-
dan. Most evidence indicates the
guerrillas cross the river from
east to west to carry out their
raids, then withdraw, if they can,
back to safety in Jordan.
Casualties are high, running up
to 80 per cent of those who actual-
ly engage in sabotage and fight-
ing with the Israelis.
"If we lose two even five, men
for every Israeli it doesn't matter,"
said the Al Fatah spokesman.
"There are 100 million Arabs and
only two or three million Israelis.
In the end, we cannot fail.'
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II

3

"We are still in the first stage
of a long campaign," he said.

Smith said that as long as any "This is the stage of hit and run.
action taken by the Legislature We know we are not strong enough
was of resolution format, the con to tackle the Israeli army in theE
flict with the constitutional right occupied territories. We can only
of theRege to overutnte Uih m a k e life uncomfortably for
of the Regents to govern the Upi- them."\
versity could be avoided,.he.
Vietnam is topographically afar
The report remained critical of cry from the rocky, sun-bleached
the methods by which the Uni- hills of Jordan, but the spokes-
versity transfers general funds to man says:
different areas of need. "If the Viet Cong can defy tloe
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Speaking on
CHINESE PAINTING
in the YUAN DYNASTY
An illustrated lecture
THURSDAY OCT. 10-4:10 P.M.
And. B, Angell Hall
M. Cahill is Professoroof Oriental A rt at
U of Calif or ia---Berkeley

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