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October 06, 1968 - Image 16

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-06
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Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 6, 1968

Sunday, October 6, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

._ _

'SELF-ACTUALIZATION':
Career counseling helps student
select from 45,000 occupations

Interview. schedule
(Continued from Page 2)
GOVERNMENT AGEN~CIES

Educational Division counsels,
places 2500 future teachers

By RENA SELDON
By the time an undergraduate
becomes a senior--and maybe be-
fore--a difficult decision facing
him: just what job to choose from
some 45,000 occupations.
If you are trying to come to
answer, whether a graduate,
undergraduate or alumni, t h e
Career Planning and Development
Unit (CPDUi of Placement Serv-.
ices may be of help. Located at
3200 SAB, CPDU offers occupa-
tional and personal counseling to
all students.
David A. Gillette, assistant di-
rector of the Placement Services
and counselor at the Unit, con-
siders "self-actualization" to be
the first step toward planning a
career.
Once the student has answered
for himself questions like, "Am I
most creative with ideas or
things?", "Do I enjoy working
with groups or with individuals?",
and "Do I have any prejudice
toward working with people who
are less fortunate than myself,
physically, mentally, socially, fi-
nancially?", he may be able to
choose an occupation more wisely.
To help the student, an occupa-
tional information library is
maintained in the Careers office.
It's collection includes copies of
the U.S. Department of L a b o r
Dictionary of Occupational Titles,
directories of available positions
from various states, and the
Placement Annual,
Vocational testing is not a
major tool of the counselor at
CPDU. "Students think if they
take a test, the machine will grind
out an answer for them," says
Mildred Webber, director of the
counseling unit.
If a student wants to take tests,
he might be referred by his coun-
sel or to the Bureau of Psycholo-
gical Services.
Group as well as individual
counseling sessions are held at
the careers unit. Counseling re-
cords are confidential, available
only to the counselor who works
with the student.
ENGINEERS
\JCKER S
Controls, transmits and converts
power with its HYDRAULIC COM-
PONENTS AND SYSTEMS for
" AEROSPACE
A MOBILE EQUIPMENT
*tMACHINERY
0 MARINE AND ORDNANCE
APPLICATIONS
Looking for the challenge of real
engineering work? Want to learn
while having the satisfaction of
contributing, of responsibility for a
port of the team effort? Want the
financial and personal develpmentj
rewards available with the leader
in a growth industry?
Vickers is seeking engineering1
graduates for attractive positions,
in research, design,' development,
and sales engineering. We'll be in-
terviewing on campus bth this fall
and next spring. Pon to talk to us.
Sign up now in the placement
office.
CICKEoSt
Colege Relaions Staff

Box 302, Troy, Mich.'4$084
An Equal Opportunity Employer

i_
i
I

United States Air Force
Air Force Logistics
United States Marines
United States Navy

10-17-68
10-29-68
9-23, 24, 25
11-18, 19,20
11-18, 19, 20
9-16, 18-68
11-18, 20

2-26-69
1-22-69
1-20, 21, 22
3-24, 25- 26
3-24, 25, 26
1-20, 22-69
3-24,-26-69

4

Navy Management Intern
Naval Research Laboratory
Naval Command Systems Support Activity
Naval Personnel Program Support Activity
Maritime Administration
Social Security Administration, Chi. Pay. Ctr.
Defense Intelligence Agency 1
Defense Supply Agency
National Security Agency]
Tennessee Valley Authority
National Labor Relations Board
Bureau of the Budget 10
Bureau of the Census
I Chicago Payment Ctr., Soc. Sec. Admin.
National Center for Health Statistics
Public Service Commission of Canada
United States Civil Service Commission
Department of Commerce
National Institutes of Health
Internal Revenue Service
Public Health Service1
U.S. Geological Survey, Topographic Div.
Vista
Peace Corps
Note: This list is subject to extensive rev
companies will also be scheduling visits--a
present.

2-17-69
1-29-69
3-4-69
11-8-68 2-18-69
3-20-69

10-21-68

1-19, 20-68
11-15-68,
12-5, 6-68
11-8-68
11-5-68
-24, 25-68
10-23-68
10-31-68

2-10-69
2-28-69
2-20-69

3-3-69
2-5-69
10-10-68 2-7-69
1-23-69
2-25-69
10-11-68 2-27-69
10-25-68 1-27, 28, 29-69
10-24-68 2-28-69
11-18-22-68 3-17-21-69
11-18-22-68
vision, since many other
number are pending at

PART OF THE CAREER counseling services that are available
at the Placement Services is a large library of material describ-
ing more than 45,000 occupations. Literature may be borrowed by
students through the CPDU.

By SUSAN ROTHSTEIN
Whether it's kindergarten or
college, assisting or administrat-
ing, Peace Corps or Vista, teach-
nig is the business of the educa-
tional placement division of the
University's Placement Services.
A scholastic matchmaker, the
service fills some 2,500 teaching
positions annually from nearly
35,000 requests.
Besides publishing a weekly bul-
letin of interview schedules and
job openings, the placement office
keeps records and information on
the schools that come for inter-
views. They also provide career
counseling for the education ma-
jor who has not selected a field
or who is interested in a non-
teaching career.
Educational placement division
will hold a 'meeting in October
when seniors can register with the
division.
Though many placement3 will
be made through mail correspon-
dence, approximately 3,500 per-
sonal -interviews are conducted
each year by the educational divi-
sion 650 representatives of schools
came to campus last year.
While under the scrutinizing
eyes of the interviewer, "it may
be some consolation for the stu-
dent to know that interviewers are
interviewed too. We have to be se-
lective about which schools will be
allowed to interview," Dr. Elbert
Van Aken, director of the educa-
tional division said.
The greatest demand of the job
schools is for elementary and set;-
ondary school teachers in English,
science, mathematics, foreign lan-
guages, business, industrial and
vocational education, library sci-
ence and most types of special ed-
ucation.
Most national salaries range
from $6,200 to $9,500, with Michi-
gan salaries slightly higher than
the national average.
The bureau also has available
information on a variety of teach-
ing programs for students with a
liberal arts degree interested in
further study or community devel--
opment programs-including MAT
programs, Peace Corps, Teachers'
Corps, and Vista.
Students interested in the Peace
Corps should fill out applications
a year before departure is plan-
ned. Mathematics, science and
physical education teachers are in
high demand, but about 65 percent
of all Peace Corps volunteers are
liberal arts majors.

EDUCATIONAL DIVISION of Placement Services places almost
every student who wants .to go into teaching. Besides bringing in-
terviewers to campus, the unit fills many positions by mail.

DETROIT PUBLIC
Beginning Salary
Interviewing Tea(
November 14, 196-"
APPLICANTS SHOULD WA
WORK IN LOW I NC
Information and applications are ova
Schmidt, 476 Schools Center Bldg.,
Michigan 48202.
See your placement offic
NORTHWESTERN
GRADUATE SC
BUSINESS ADMIN
Thursday, Oct
Bureau of Appoi
Admission Interviews wit
Assistant Dean and Direc
Order Your Da
P
Phone 764.

Thanks ...
to all who worked-
on this year s
supplement
Sup-Iement Staff:
Alice Nusbaum,
promotions mgr.
Kan Kraus,
assoc. bus. mgr."
Craig Wolson
A special thanks to:
Carolyn Miegel
Pat O'Donohue
Andy Sacks
Steve Elman
Dave Pfeffer
Randy Rissman
Edit Staff Trainees
University Bureau of
Appointments
Arch Gamm
and the IMen in the Shop

The failure to communicate. Everybody worries a
At Xerox, you can help do something about

To help breach the walls of misunderstand-
ing that separate people and communities
there must be more effective communica-
tion of ideas.
Xerox is deeply and totally involved in the
entire spectrum of graphic communications
...to make a contribution to the world in
which we live...to help people, everywhere.
In the educational field, we're developing
techniques to speed the learning processes
--and help the underprivileged to acquire
skills that will enable them to actively par-
ticipate in, and contribute to, society.
Xerbx research and development teams are
looking ahead to major advances in areas

such as color xerography and 3-dimensional
imaging.
Our copying and duplicating machines are
reproducing the graphic data needed to make
business and government more efficient. Our
information systems people, through Tele-
copier and LDX-Long Distance Xerography
-will transmit them at speeds approaching
real-time.
Your degree in Engineering, Science, Busi-
ness Administration or Liberal Arts can qual-
ify you for some intriguing openings at Xerox,
in fundamental and applied research, engi-
neering, manufacturing, programming, ad-
ministration and marketing/sales.

CAMPUS INTEl
Friday, Octob+
(Business Administ
Friday, Octob+
(Engineering & Scie
See your Placemer
our brochure and tc
For other informati
Roger Vander Plc
P.O. Box 251;Webs
Equal Opportunity
XEROTELECOPIER At}
Of XEROX CORPORATI

Check into a Career Opportu nity at Detroit Bank & Trust
Our representative will be on ca mpus for interviews Oct. 15, 1968

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