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October 04, 1968 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Five

Friday, October 4, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PageF

Friday, October 4, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

*Placement service opposes
opening fles to stu dents

SRC proposes reorganization
of 'U' bail under SGC control

By SAM DAMREN
A year ago this week Student
Government Council and Grad-
uate Assembly formed a joint ad
hoc committee to study the Bu-
reau of Appointments and Occu-
pational Information.
Much has changed in the past
year including the bureau's
archaic name-yet there is con-
siderable dissatisfaction among
committee members with their
work.
The brunt of student concern
centers around the contents of a
student's file in the newly-nanied
Placement Service.,
SGC member Tom Westerdale,
Grad, fears they may contain

faculty recommendations which
could adversly affect a student's
chances of getting a job.
"Student records should be open
to the student." Westerdale as-
serts. Only then. he feels, can the
student be sure there is no detri-
mental information contained in
the files.
However, Placement Service Di-
rector Evart W. Ardis insists the
files must remain confidential and
has refused to allow committee
members to inspect them. -
"Professors writing the recom-
mendations might feel inhibited
if they knew the students were
going to read them," Ardis said.
Despite the disagreement over

acces to the files, Ardis believes
the committee has had "a drama-
tic and helpful effect." As evi-
dence of the committee's work,
Ardis has released a list of 13
changes that have been made-
including the offices new name,
as well as alterations in admin-
istrative procedures and per-
sonnel.
However, Westerdale says the
student committee had nothing to
do with the changes which have
been made.
"I have no feeling of having
contributed anything toward their
initiation or fulfillment," he says.
"I suspect that other committee
members feel as I do."
At present the committee is in
a state of limbo. It has not met
since the winter term and only two
of its six original members are
known to still be on campus.
Ardis, however, has expressed
great interest in getting the com-
mittee working again. He has
asked SGC to appoint new mem-
bers if necessary.

(Continued from Page 1)
amendments and three expressed
"concerns."
One amendment would elimin-
ate the special disclosure privileg-
es, granted to the faculty in the
original document. A similar
amendment was adopted by SGC
when it took up consideration of
the report last month.
Another amendment defined
the jurisdiction of the document
.so it would apply to records kept
by all nine OSA divisions.
Another amendment guaranteed
the student access to his own
OSA records, except those kept by
Health Service and OSA's coun-
seling division.
These two alterations in the
document led to expression of
concern by some SRC faculty
members that -recommendations
in the Placement Service would
now be opened to the student.
This concern was not translat-
ed into a further amendment but
will be expressed in the report
of SRC action to the Student Af-
fairs Subcommittee on Disclo-

sure - the group which drafted
the policy.
The policy on disclosure of OSA
records requires ratification by
SGC, Graduate Assembly and a
committee of OSA administrators
as well as SRC.
SRC was the last of the four
organizations to act on the draft.
The report will now be revised
by the subcommittee on disclosure
and returned to the four groups
for ratification.
Deliberations on the contents
and disclosure of OSA records
were initiated in 1966.
In August of that year, the Uni-
versity complied with a subpoena
from the House Un-American Ac-
tivities Committeee and disclosed
membership lists of radical organ-
izations.
Since the HUAC disclosures,

such membership lists have been
eliminated from the files and the
new policy, when ratified, will
proscribe procedures for handling
subpoenas.
The SRC report to the drafting
committee will also inquire as to
the contents of the "basic docu-
ment" which will be maintained
on microfilm after other OSA files
are destroyed five years after a
student leaves the University.
In addition, the report will
raise the question of whether
counseling records should be gov-
erned by professional ethics or
oy the new disclosure policy.
Originally, all OSA records were
to be controlled by the disclosure
report. But an SRC amendment
adopted yesterday would limit dis-
closure of Health Service records
only by professional ethics.

TEN YEARS AFTER
Fri., Sat., Suf.-Oct. 4,5, 6,
Grande Ballroom in Detroit
at Grand River and Beverly
one block South of Joy
8:30 P.M.
Must be 17
Admission $3.50
SUNDAY-NO AGE LIMIT
7-11 P.M.

I:
II

A Russ Gibb Show

_ _
n rrrrw r

GM announces Chevy
mini-car for 1970 ine

NEW YO K (M) - General Mo-
tors will introduce an American-
built small car in the summer of
1970, Chairman James M. Roche
announced yesterday.
"This new car will be more than
a foot shorter than any car GM
makes in the United States to-
day," Roche said.
"It will weigh about 1,900
pounds and will be about a foot
longer than- the best selling for-
eign car."
The best-selling foreign car, is
\ the German-built Volkswagen.
Called at present, the XP887, the
GM car will be engineered, pro-
duced and distributed by Chevro-

let Motor Division, Roche said. It
w ill be assembled at Lordstwn,
Ohio.
GM soon will begin to build ex-
panded plant facilities there and
in several other locations where
the various components will be
produced.
Roche said the new passenger
car "will not be a pocket size ver-
sion of any other car," but instead
"will have a look and character
all its own."
He said the new car will be
"roomier, with more trunk space"
than the best, selling foreign car
and "superior in performance with
excellent fuel economy."

English Language Film Festival
Film No. 1
LONG DAY'S JOURNEY
INTO NIGHT'
Sat., Oct. 5-9:00 P.M.-75c
NEWMAN CENTER, 331 Thompson

PHILIP S. STAMPS
T- ching
Afro-Am erican Dance
Elementary Classes-Thursdays: 8:30-10 p.m.
Starting October 10
Intermediate Classes-Wednesdays: 8:30-10 p.m.
Starting October 9
Ten Week Courses-$15.00 each
JONES SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
401 N.Division
For information call
662-5105
Sponsored by Ann Arbor Dance Theatre

XIth Annual
Poor Richard's
Folk Festival
Featuring:
JACK QUINE
MARGERY HIMEL
DAVE JOHNS
JIM STAND
NADIA and FRED
and BILL and SUE WEISKE
STILL ONLY 75c
Free Donuts, Cider, and Coffee

The cpeat
coming
SAT U RDAY, OCT. 12
8 P.M. at
OLYMPIA STA DIUM-Detroit

TICKETS:

$6,$5,$4

Friday, Oct. 4

8:!30 P.M

NEWMAN CENTER
331 Thompson

ON SALE at Olympia, Grinnell's and
all major J. L. Hudson Co. stores
MAIL ORDERS: send check or money order
and self-addressed envelope to Olympia Stadium,
5920 Grand River, Detroit, 48208

IJi-

We at HENDERSON FORD wish to thank the students and
faculty at The University of Michigan for helping us make
1968 our greatest year. We sincerely appreciate your business
-thank you very much.
We are proud to announce the addition of four University
students to our sales staff.

CARL DAVIS
JEFF LEE . .

L.tS.itA

. """ ." ." ..... . Law School,

LEW HENDERSON
JIM NELSON .. .

. .".". . . .®.".s L. S.& A.

.. . .. . ... Dental School

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