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October 04, 1968 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-04

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BIG TEN
DUCKS
See. editorial page

CZI rP

lfirtgt

~~E~aitl

hligh--34
Low--40
Partly cloudy,
colder tomorrow

Vol. LXX1X, No. 31 Ann Arbor, Michigan-Friday, October 4, 1968 Ten Cents
LSA' board: Judicious exceptions to the r
By RON LANDSMAN at in the context of' counseling," wards" to keep students in school. board tends to take the student's simple. There is a two-way rla- "They show a real interest in students
The administrative board of says Assistant Dean James Shaw, "They want students to make it word," Shaw says, "and if he pre- tionship between the board and you," says one student who had board."
the literary college," says Asso- chairman of the board. "After here," he says, "They seem to sents any sort of evidence that he the student-not only does the one to three hour talks with var- sponsible
ciate Dean James Robertson, all, the college is an educational, feel that if a student was accept- can do better after being asked to student try to convince the board ious board members when he was mentatio
former board chairman, "is an not a judicial, institution." ed, he ought to be able to make leave, we tend to support him." that he has changed and will in serious trouble. "It's really board de
agency for making informed and In all three areas the board it." At times that trust seems to succeed a second time, but the something personal," he adds. The e4
judicious exceptions to the rules." follows the policy of making "We don't want to give a stu- lead almost to blind faith. The board as well tries to influence "They don't lose any sleep over it, the boa
The administrative board - "judicious exceptions" to the rules. dent another chance to fail," Ro- board does not go by majority the student to improve. but it's the kind of a feeling a therbo
delegated by the literary college "The board tries to work with a bertson says. "We want to pro- votes. If a member sees some hope The key here is the interview teacher has about his students- Robertso
faculty to administer the college's sense of equity in allowing for tect against that." But the policy in what the student says either in the student has with a board it's really good to see him do orki:
policy on academic standing, mis- human factors," Robertson says. is "liberal" nonetheless. an interview or a written petition, member. "Not only does the stu- something well." Thewrk
conduct and requirements - must "The spirit, if not the letter, of the Robertson, who chaired t h e his urging alone can win the stu- dent try and impress the inter- The board consists of four The r
make decisions which affect the rules is met." board for 17 years before moving dent re-instatement. viewer with his changes," Shaw faculty members, two elected by the meh
total directions of a student's life, it is on the question of aca- on to deanship of the Residential At times. this process may lead says, "but the interview serves to the college faculty every two g the
It tries to do so with a recogni- demic freedom that this is pro- College, is recognized as the major to decisions that even the student gie the student a view as to how years for six-year t e r m s ; transcrip
tion of- the student as an individ- bably most important, for here architect of the board as it exists involved may question, the board feels." two students from the literary probatior
ual. the student has the most at stake - oday. The philosophy toward stu- "They really had no provocation Shaw notes that at least half college steering committee; and naha
While the board does have re- -his continuing presence at the dents which he imparted to the for letting me back in," one stu- the students asked to leave are seven ex-officio members term just
sponsibility for different areas, it University. current board determines much, of dent says. "It just amounted to eventually re-instated, and t h e The ex-officio members - the about,1
sees its prime role as the super- And what the board calls judic- what the bqard does today. writing a better petition the success of a significant number of deans and administrative assist- term.
v-isor of the counseling program. ious exceptions, one student de- Involved is trust in the student second time I wanted to get in." them is proof of the wisdom on ants who spend a large part of The b
"All our decisions are arrived scribed as "bending over back- and what he tells the board, "The But the operation is not t h a t the choice to allow them to return, their time advising and counseling See AD]

Ten Pages
Pu les'
- comprise a "s m a 1
The small board is, re-
for the actual imple-
n of policies the larger
vises.
ducational philosophy of
d, inherited from t h e
n era, is reflected to
ree by the procedure used
ng with students.
egistrar's office s e r v e s
tanical function of send-
board the names and
ts of students who are on
z, who have fallen be-
2.0 average during the
t ended. That comes to
500-2000 students each
oard then sends to t h e
MINISTRATIVE. Page 2

SRC asks control
of bail bySGC
By MARTIN HIRSCHMAN
Faculty Assembly's Student Relations Committee (SRC)
yesterday recommended reorganization of University bail
fund operations under the control of Student Government
Council.
The SRC recommendation is expected to carry consider-
able weight in the final adjudication of the bail fund I
problem. The recommendation came in response to an inquiry
from Acting Vice President for Student Affairs Barbara
Newell.
Mrs. Newell and her representatives have indicated the
-_ - --------interest of the administration
in eliminating the bail fund
I O s currently operated by the Of-
fice of Student Affairs.
The SRC proposal would create
a bail fund "for students in the
se lin g University" which would be or-
ganized and administered by SGC
and "financed by non-University
funds."
o SRC members chose not to de-
fine "non-University funds,"
agreeing there was an advantage
Housewives, students and clergy- aing the term va e
pp mn frmedpicet inesoutidein leaving the term vague. The j
mhen formed ,picket lines outside decision was made in anticipation
the A&P Food Store on Huron of an expected ruling by State
Street yesterday in an attempt to Att. Gen. Frank Kelley on the
convince the store's management legality of a University bail fund,
to stop stocking California table
grapes. The ruling was requested last
month by Rep. Roy Smith (R-
The grape boycott is in support Ypsilanti) who questioned t h e
of striking farm workers led by legality of the use of SGC funds
Cesar Chavez and the United to post bond for University stu-
Farm Workers. dents and others arrested in wel-
Picketing lasted from 3-6 p.m. fare demonstrations Sept. 6,
and will continue daily until the The SGC action, in addition to
store stops carrying the grapes, the use of an OSA bail fund to
said a spokesman for the pro- post bond for students arrested in
testers. the welfare demonstration of,
* Warren Hartman, general man- Sept. 5, led to the current re-
ager of the store, said that the examination of University bail
decision to stock the grapes was procedures,
"out of my hands." He explained The SRC recommendation did
only A&P state headquarters in not suggest sources of money for
Detroit could make the decision. the bail fund. However, it was
In a related development, Stu- suggested that financial support
dent Government Council 1 a s t would come largely from the cur- .
night voiced support for the boy- rent SGC and OSA bail funds. 5

Big Ten investigation

clears
Conference
cites single
infraction'

GU

of

charges

-Associated Press

Yip pie fleaflies, fafds

Yippie Abbie Hoffman is dragged to a paddywagon after lie attempted to disrupt a meeting of
the House Un-American Activities Committee yesterday in Washington. lie planned to strip off
his jacket-a converted American flag-to reveal a Viet Cong flag painted on his back. Hoffman
was charged with mutilating Old Glory. A policeman was bitten on the hand while making the
arrest.
AC,*ADEMIC ',FREED OM:
Cal faculty hitregents,
s upport, Cleaver 's class

By DAVID WEIR
Sports Editor
The Big Ten yesterday cleared
University athletics of alleged
rule violations.
In a 21-page report of its in-
vestigation, the conference ab-
solved University athletes and
coaches with the single exception
of a loan transaction between
football player Cecil Pryor and ex-
assistant coach Y. C. McNease,
In the report, Big Ten Commis-
sioner Bill Reed said, "With the
exception of the loan transaction,
it is my considered judgment that
with respect to the allegations.
either there is not sufficient
grounds for believing a violation
occurred; or that remedial action
taken (by Michigan) is adequate."
The conference investigated al-
leged violations as separate acts
and not as examples of standard
conduct by Big Ten athletes as
was charged in a Daily article last
Feb: 9.
Documented evidence presented
in the article included admissions
by owners of one local restaurant,
a men's shop and two movie thea-
ters of discounts and free mer-
chandise given to varsity athletes
at the University.

cott.
"We specifically support t h e
efforts of the Ann Arbor G r a p e
Boycott Committee to have all
California table grapes removed
from ,stores in this area until the
strike of the California g r a p e
t pickers is settled," the resolution
stated.
"In particular we ask the Un-
ion, the League, and all University
dining halls to cooperate in the
boycott," it said.

Sources last night said present
proposals would provide, $1000 for
new bail fund from the financial
aids money which presently con-
stitutes the OSA bail fund.

:i
fl

By FRANK BROWNING
BERKELEY, Calif.-Faculty at
the University of California lam-
basted the university's regents
yesterday, vowing to take "all ap-
propriate steps" to give full credit
for a course to be taught by Black
militant Eldridge Cleaver.
The University's Board of Re-
gents last month whittled down

The SRC recommendation In- the prospective course of ten lee-
cluded a request that SGC report tures to only one.
back to the committee on the ad- A r'esolution passed in the fac-
ministration of the funds. ulty senate by a 500-vote margin
In other action, the committee attacked the regents' "hasty and
approved a policy which would ill considered actions as a violation
disclose OSA records with several of the academic freedom and au-
See SRC, Page 5 tonomy of the senate" and of the

PROPOSE REFORMS

Engli~sh (
By MARK LEVIN
Editor
New English department chairman Russel
Fraser will unveil today a series of proposals
which, if approved, would significantly alter
the emphasis of University English instruc-
tion.
The proposed curriculum changes, which
will be presented to a special faculty meet-
ing, are intended to improve concentration
and graduate programs and relieve faculty
teaching burdens However, lower level fresh-
man-sophomore courses are hard hit in the
restructuring.
The comprehensive revisions include six
I major reforms:
-Lowering of the teaching burden for
English professors from the current nine
hours to six hours per semester.
-Redistribution of administrative respon-
sihiliiethrouzhou+ the department toin-_

Eept.

shifts em

faculty members responsible for blamed Reagan for the regents' -'}
Cleaver's course, No. 139x. action, declaring: A number of athletes and
But the senate adjourned, only "Ronald Reagan is a punk, a coaches also admited knowledge -~Associated prc 6
to meet a mass of students chant- sissy and a coward, and I chal- of the alleged violations. rTil
ometams fsdntchn-lenge him to a duel to the death ; igersS , losers I
ing, "Shame! Shame!" over the r en h sa ule de The conference investigation by
ambiguous wording of the faculty I give him a choice of weapons-a Big Ten Assistant Commissioner "Lolich is up," people used to say. "Time for a beer." But they'll
.gun, a knife, a baseball bat or and Examiner John Dewey uncov- say it no more, as Mighty Mickey belts his first major league
Students at the Center for Par- marshmallows." ered the illegal transaction be- home run off Card Nelson Briles. Mickey's pitching helped too,
ticipant Education-an agency of Specifically, the faculty resolu- tween Pryor and McNease. and the Tigers clobbered St. Louis 8-1 yesterday in the second
the Associated Students of UC - tion: The incident, which the confer- game of the World Series. See story, Page 9.
plan a mass meeting Monday -Charged that the regents' ac- ence will consider later, involves
night in protest of what CPE tion "violated the academic free- Pryor's arrest on an assault and
chairman Rick Brown called dom of students by preventing battery charge. Reed stated that ONE DISMISSAL:
"toothless action.''!them from taking for credit a Pryor called McNease for help
Speaking at Stanford University course duly authorized." and that McNease paid his $25
Wednesday night, Cleaver derided -Vowed that the senate would bond and $57 in parking fines.
Gov. Ronald Reagan and the seek to nullify a regental regula- tJconjvi ts
three presidential candidates. He tion prohibiting more than one The next day in court, Pryor
;ter. Regents had instated the assault and battery charge. " " "
regulation at their last meeting, "At the time, McNease con- nm
referring specifically to EldridgeI sidered it a loan to Pryor but no
for Course 139x to carry on the McNease treated it as a matter PHILIP BLOCK now presided over four trials rt
autho'ized program of instruction between himself and the boy and Five University students and one ;ated to the welfare demonstr
this quarter on campus or off." no one else on the staff knew Fd tions of Sept. 5-6-termed reco
Com about it. non-student were found guilty of time" of one hour.
The senate directed the Commit- criminal trespass yesterday in Ann
ors freedom to teach what they tee on Courses "to take all appro- "But early this year when for- Arbor Municipal Court.s The con- In their defense, attorneys Ec
ted in.. priate steps to assure course and mer Athletic Director Fritz Chris- viction ended a day-long trial win Rothschild and Joel Feldnj
credit status for the program." ler was informed of the incident, which included dismissal of the !attempted to show that the "ai
re new plan, English concentra- The senate also repudiated ac- he insisted the boy repay through case against a seventh defendant. tight" police identification pr(
be required to take five of the tion taken by the regents to cen- a student loan. The boy was de- cedures were, in fact, riddled wil
y period courses, either the sur- sure four UC professors who were 1lared ineligible, but this was The defendants were among 192 doubt.
smaller studies courses. Students responsible for Cleaver's proposed abated. persons' arrested at the Washte-tm
naw County Bldg. Sept. 5-6 during: Rothschild emphasized t h a
se at least two courses on sub- course- "Ordinarily, the institution a sit-in protesting the refusal of none of the movies, photograph
ting the romanticists. Sponsors of the course were two would be cited in such a matter," county officials to meet the de- or testimony of arresting office
sociologists and two psychology continued Rood. "But McNease mands of a group of welfare established conclusively that t
cific content of the 40-man professors. Credit had been ar- left the school in January. And mothers for emergency funds to defendants were actually in t1
rses would be chosen by the in ranged through a special agency as the matter now stands, the loan buy school clothing. County Bldg. at the time of t-
ofessor from any subject matter set up to handle experimental !has been repaid. Whether any' Judge Samuel J. Elden dismissed arrest.
rtain literary period. coui'ses. h thing more should be done will be the case of Mitchell Nelson, '69, Subsequent testimony by La
One of the major items drawing ;tecs fMthl esn
mple, a professor could offer a student ire was the defeat of an up to the athletic directors." because the prosecution could not rence Berlin, chairman of the An
he Romantic period on Words- amendment insisting that either Yesterday's report follows by identify Nelson as one of those Arbor Civil Liberties Union, shon
Coleridge, or just on Keats, de- credit or a "credit waiver" be less than two months the confer- arrested inside the County Bldg. ed that one person brought in
h ti i te'et i th given for the course. ence statement of August 12, 1968 The jury of four women and the buses had apparently not be
The senate resolution was 1)re- which cleared Michigan State two men returned their verdict of i the County Bldg. previous to h
- sented by physics Prof. Ar hur University of similar charges list- apprehension.
ys the new system is designed to Kip, chairman of the senate last ed in a copyrighted Daily article. i Some of the testimony of tI
dividual professor greater liberty year, and it was authored by eight . Feb. 11, 1968. - lip ,isr t . arresting officers seemed contr

--Restructuring of the English survey and
major authors courses into surveys covering
six literary periods. Forty-man studies
courses limited only to a general literary
period would also be introduced.
-Replacement of English 123 by a com-
position course in Shakespeare, already in
effect on an experimental basis.
-Easing certain requirements through
independent study and comprehensive ex-
aminations.
Fraser says the total amount of teaching
would remain constant under the new pro-
gram, while faculty members would be al-
lowed greater time to advise concentrates
and graduate students. -
"The intent of the program is to improve
our concentration and graduate program.
The additional time will allow professors
to be more intimately conversant with con-

8

ual profess
are interes
Under th
tors would
new literar
veys or the
would choo
jects preda
The spe
studies cou
dividual pr
within a ce
For exan
course in t
worth and
pending on
period
Fraser sa
offer the in

Las
re-
a-
rd
d-
an
ir-
th
alt
hs
.,.s
he
in
ri-
to
enI
is
hie
a-

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