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October 02, 1968 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-02

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wedresday, October 2, 1968

__

'

Discuss the Invasion of Czechoslovakia:
WERE YOU IN PRAGUE OR
MOSCOW THIS SUMMER?
Many of your fellow students and professors are
interested in getting together to share experiences,
analysis, and gossip. If you were in Eastern Europe
or the USSR recently, why not join us on
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 3-8:00 P.M.
2235 ANGELL HALL

Midshipmen gridders

strive

to stay afloat

By JOEL BLOCK
Last year, Ron Johnson created
a new Michigan single, game rush-
ing record with a 270 yard per-
formance against the Midshipmen
of Navy.
His off-the-left-tackle wind-
sprints of 62, 51, and 7 2 yards
scored two touchdowns and set up
another but it was Navy's "doubt-
ful starter," Terry Murray, who
took Johnson (and the other Wol-
verines) out of the spotlight and
into the depths of a 26-21 defeat.
Murray, a halfback, did not play
in Navy's first two games that
year because of an injury, but he
miraculously recovered during the
contest and scored the game-win-
ning touchdown on a 25-yard
sprint with 4:37 left to play.
- - = - - - - - - -

Try Daily Classifieds

-1

This year the Middie team
doesn't have the problem with
"doubtful starters," but rather
with "starting doubtfuls."
Sophomore quarterback Mike
McNallen was expected to com-
plete a troika of superlative Navy
quarterbacks and cofitinue in the
path of his predecessors, Heisman
Trophy winner Roger Staubach
and John Cartwright, who broke
most of Staubach's p a s s i n g
records.
But the scores of the first two
Navy games this year indicate that
he hasn't. The Nitany Lions of
Penn State overwhelmed the Mid-
dies 31-6 in the season opener and
Boston College set a school pro-
ductivity record in demolishing
them 49-15 last week.
TROUBLES
The statistics of the Penn State
game point out Navy's troubles.
Five of McNallen's 30 attempted
passes were intercepted and the
Middies also gave the ball away
four more times on fumbles. In
addition ,McNallen only completed
13 of those attempts for a meager
113 yards in the air.
Navy's ground attack is in an
equally frustrated state. A total
of eight Midshipmen rushers could
only accumulate a total of seven
yards in the Penn State disaster.
Jeri Balsly, a 180-pound senior
halfback who was supposed to be
the top rushing prospect, only
averaged a miniscule 0.7 yards per
carry.
Before the season started, Navy
coach Bill Elias said, ". . . we
will not be intimidated on defense
in 1968." Things have obviously
AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
971 -3700

not worked that way so far for the
Middies as they have allowed 80
points in their two games this
year. They gave up 245 yards to
Penn State on the ground and
Boston College was just as over-
powering-
RHETORIC CHANGED
Elias has changed his rhetoric
now. "In the Penn State game we
made several costly mistakes, but
still showed some strength on de-
fense. Then in the Boston College
contest we completely went to
pieces.h"
Elias says he now faces a "major
rebuilding job." "Right now there
are no high points pn the squad.
Only 14 of the players ever suited
up for a varsity ball game and
they need a lot of experience to
develop."
Elias promises a few surprises
for the Michigan defenders, but
adds, "I planned a couple of sur-
prises for our first two oppoxientsI
and both of them backfired."
The Middie coach neglected to
mention probably the only bonus
he's received in the first two
games--a good punter. Jack Det-
weiler, a bench-riding sophomore,
place-kicked last year, has turned
into this year's starting punter.
However; his 40-yard plus punts
have only given opposing offenses
more yardage to eat up before
they crossed the Navy goal line.
Elias has trouble forgetting the

Advisory group adds
to T'M priorities list,

MIKE McNALLEN
troubles Ron Johnson caused his
defense last year and the play
which worked so well for the Wol-
verine captain. "We saw that same
off-tackle maneuver used against
us last week and we still can't
stop it."
When asked about the possible
drop in morale the team might
have suffered following the two
depressing losges, Elias responded,
"The only morale which has fallen
has been mine."

By DIANA ROMANCHUK
The Advisory Committee on
Recreation, Intramurals, and Club
Sports made several major and
minor additions to its priority list
on recreation needs at an open
meeting last night.
The item of most critical con-
cern is the maintenance of the
intramural facilities.
IM Director Rodney Grambeau
has compiled a job description of
what is required, but the basic
trouble arises over jurisdiction.
Though the Athletic Department
is presently responsible for main-
taining all facilities, it has failed
to adequately keep up such fields
at South Ferry and Wines.
The next meeting of the com-
mittee, in two weeks, will be de-
voted entirely to a discussion of
this problem.
A second item, raised by Bob
Gillon of the Michigan Sports'
Club Association, is that of in-
surance, especially on trips such
as those taken by the rugby and
lacrosse teams.
A sub-committee, consisting of

*

*

student representatives Robin
Wright, Randy Wise, and Dave
Mildner, was set up to investigate
the legal details of the situation
which also encompasses the ques-
tion of liability.
Among the other additions to
the list of priorities was the 'pos-
sibility of building a retaining
wall and paddleball courts on the
slope formed by the new walkway
over South Forest.
Further development of recrea-
tional facilities around the dorms
and the North Campus married
quarters, a portable public address
system for use on the outdoor
fields, anrl a natural ice rink for
Wines Field, were also included.
An attempt will a made to
compile a time schedule of all
recreational facilities to determine
the, possibility of making maxi-
mum use of the limited facilities.
Since several organizations like
IFC were not represented at the
meeting, it was agreed that writ-t
ten proposals for additional pri-
orities addressed to Athletic Direc-
tor Don Canham would also be
considered.

Final baseball standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

DE T.
Balt.
Clev.
Bost.
NY
Oak.
Minn.
Cal.
Chi.
Wash.

103
91
86
86
83
82
79
67
67
65

L
59
71
75
76
'79
80
83
95
95
96

Pet.
.636
.562
.534
.531
.512
.506
.488
.414
.414
.404

GB
12
16'
17
20
21
24
36
36
3 71.

8
6
8
5
8
5
8

o
10
ii
9
.
9
8
4

12
7
10
8.
12
4
10

Ur
0
12
9
8
8
10
9
9
4

z
10
13
10
10
8
12
6
6
4

O d
13 10
9 10
6 14
89
,10 6
10
8.
5. 7
10 10
11 7

US
13
10
11
S
12
13
11
10
6

13
11
13
14
12
8
8
8
8

A
CS
10
14
7
11
14
7
11
12
10

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union_
32 Trips/Day

L

St. L
SF
Chi.
Cin.
Atl.
Pitt.
LA
Phil,
NY
Houst.

w
97
88
84
83
81
80
76
76
73
72

it'
65
74
78
79
81
82
86
86
89
90

Pet. GB
.599 -
.543 9
.519 13
.512 14
.500 16
.494 17
.469 21
.469 21
.451 24
.444 25

ii
. 8 9 11 13 12 9 10 12 13,
10 . 9 10 9 11 9 9 11 10
9 9 . 7 10 10, 12 9 8 10
7 8 11 8 10 9 11 10 9
5 9 8 10 6 9 11 12 11
6 7 8 8 12 . 8 9 9 13
9 9 6 9 9 10 . 10 7 7
8 9 9 7 7 9 8 .10 9
6 7 10 8 6 9 11 8 ' .
5t 8 8┬░ 9 t7 5 11 9 10

Gridde Pickings
His shoelaces were dirty, but they let him play anyway. Nice
guys. We all thought so. But, of course, Henry always loses. Red hair,
they say. Not everybody though.
You get awfully dirty. Will mother mind much? Ask Henry.
Henry Inows, even if he doesn't win very much.
Henry says that the cherry trees bloom in spring, but this is
autumn. You see. You should have believed me. Henry knows..
Did you say green speckles in the sky? Again! Flowing and
glowing and heavily spilling. Again! Somebody tell Henry. He will
get the cheesecloth and wash his shoelaces. The right thing to do in
such situations. Undoubtedly.
Oh no! The moth has eaten the cheesecloth. It's alright. Mother
will bake another. It won't take long. Ingredients. Stir with the silky
spoon. Wind cotton batten round the daisies and there you have it.
Another. Perhaps not as good as the first.
The first is always the best. Henry said. Like the first cobwebs in
the winter trees. Or the first time you win the Gridde Pickings. Eiter
by midnight Friday. The winners1will receive a free Cottage Inn pizza
by midnight Monday. You only have one chance each week. Henry
likes it that way.

,

.ImI w CI1

sI,

300 c@0oV

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MIX

2452 E. Stadium at Washtenaw
Ann Arbor
DIAL 663-8800
NEW HOURS
DA LY6:30AM TO 10 PM
TILt 1:00 AM FRI. & SAT. NIGHT

1. Navy at MICHIGAN (pick
score)
2. Illinois at Indiana :
3. Notre Dame at Iowa '
4. Wake Forest at Minnesota
5. Purdue at Northwestern
6. Oregon at Ohio State
7. Michigan State at Wisconsin
8. William and Mary at Pitts-
burgh
9. UCLA at Syracuse"

10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

0

Penn State at West Virginia
Maryland vs. Duke
Alabama vs. Mississippi
North Carolina State at :SMU
Washington at Oregon State
Arizona State at Wyoming
Auburn at Kentucky
Texas A&M at Florida State
Georgia at South Carolina
Columbia at Princeton
Eureka at Lakeland

We Make
Luscious Deserts

Noiv serving Mediterranean Cuisine
featuring
Chef Theodoros from Athens
Famous for our Greek Salad and Taste Tempting Desserts

I

TUSKEGEE STUDENT EXCHANGE
PROGRAM

I _ -

Kloo

n-

mqq

Be the first man on campus
to wear the only
Koratron®-approvecd

t. t

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WINTER 1969

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year-round permanent press suit.
Imagine a great-looking vested suit that machine
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At last! A special blend of 50% Dacron* polyester to
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The exchange will take place during the
second semester at Tuskeege I/nstitute, Tus-
kegee, Ala., and will run from Jan. 30,
1969 thru May 31, 1969. Students can ob-
tain information about and application for
this fully accredited university program
from the Tuskegee Exchange Program of-
fice, 1014Angell Hall.
REPRESENTATIVES IN FISHBOWL,
THURSDAY, OCT. 3

_

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