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August 27, 1968 - Image 30

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-08-27

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Tuesday, August 27, 1968

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

P(, Ie- Eight.00 THE MICHIGAN DAILY .1 1

I

'1
t 8 t
'We, Don, t Just,'
Publish , a, Newspaper,
W 0 e meet new people
9 We laugh a lot
e We fiind consolation
eWe have TG.'s
* We play football (once)
4 We make money (some)
0*We solve problems
. We gain prestige
W We become self confident
s We debate vital issues
We drink 5c Cokes
r"
JOIN the AIY staff
Come by 420 Maynard St.
between 1 P.M. and 4 P.M., Manday thru Friday'
and ask for JANE LUXON (Business staff) or'
LUCY KENNEDY (Edit staff)+
+ Us e Da11y CIassifieds +

Returnees spark optimism
for Wolverine puck squad

FI

The Truckin'
%Q iA

By ELLIOTT BERRY
A cynic might say that the
Michigan hopes for a Western
Collegiate Hockey Association title
were over the first weekend of
league competition last year.
For it was in their league opener
at Denver that the Wolverines
were nipped by the Pioneers who
carried a 2-3 league record into
the contest. This Denver victory
started the Pioneers on their way
to a twenty game win streak
which brought them an NCAA
hockey crown, and is still intact.
This cynical assessment how-
ever would be a total misrepre-
sentation of the 1967-68 WCHA
season. For Michigan it was a sur-
prisingly good season, and the
spunky Wolverines were in prime
contention for the league title un-
til late in the season when a tra-
ditionally strong Michigan Tech
club swept a crucial weekend series
from them at the Coliseum.
Coach Al Renfrew's formula for
sucess was nothing more than in-
stilling in his players a tremendous
desire to go after the puck. This
club which had nothing resembling
a super-star sported the league's
most prolific offense and at one
stretch of the season fashioned
a ten-game winning streak.
During this streak the Wolver-
ines hit their season's peak when
they traveled to Minnesota to
sweep a two game series from a
fine Gopher team. This was the
only time during the season that
Michigan could win a game from
one of the league's better teams
away from the friendly confines
of the Coliseum.
The icers' performance against
the, Gophers in five league con-
tests wasa perfect exampleof
the kind of hockey played by the
Wolverines throughout the year.
In all four regular season meet-
ings between these two, clubs it
was a story of an always hustling
Michigan team outchecking and
outscoring a more polished and
slightly faster Minnesota club.
In the opening contest of the
playoffs, a game which proved to
be Michigan's final contest of the
'67-'68 season, the Wolverines
once again met Minnesota. The
Gophers bombarded the Michigan
goal for the first 18 minutes of
the first period and built up an
overwhelming 4-0 lead.
For the remaining 42 minutes
of play the Wolverines took con-.
trol and swarmed all over Gopher
teritory battling back to make
the score 4-3 before finally suc-
cumbing 5-3.
Michigan finished with an 18-
9 record, good for fourth place in
the WCHA. Although Renfrew
was hardly elated with such a fin-
ish, he was always quick to
credit his players for their hustle.

F1

A FACE-bFF in the Michigan zone sets the Wolverine icers on
their toes in a battle with always-tough Michigan Tech last year.
Often slow to get started, Michigan was forced to come from be-
hind in a number of games. The final effort fell short when, the
icers dropped a 5-3 decision and a spot in the NCAA tournament
to Minnesota.

A fire notice
for the Ohms
BUFFALO- The Daily, via this traditional first issue, will
be perused for the first time by thousands of freshmen in num-
erous hometowns. But few can rival the honors of the locale
datelined above. Here, in the self-avowed Bowling Capital of the
World, many of the nation's priceless gems are located.
It is here that Chief Red Jacket stands in marbled grandeur,
surrounded by the graves of his fallen brethren in the tribal res-
ervation of Forest Lawn Cemetery. It is here that streets and
schools are named for one of the city's finest, Millard Fillmore.
It is here that Grover Cleveland's illegitimate son became dean
of the University of Buffalo's Medical School. And it is here that
thousands of motorists pass, unnoticing, by the Statue of Wom-
anhood on their way home to such suburban towns as Tonawanda,
Lackawanna, and Cheektowaga.
Yet, until now, the Queen City of the Great Lakes has
been unaware of the greatest of all her treasurers. For Buf-
falo, New York, was the birthplace, 21 years ago, of that ar-
chetype of all Michigan undergraduates, that most ardent,
practitioner of the "tried, tested, and true" philosophy. of
life-and the one whose adherence to that middle-of-the-
road policy was so unflagging that he managed to carve a
unique rut for himself-Doe Ohms.
Those of us retu'ning to Michigan for a third or fourth year
feel a strange sadness now that the good doctor has graduated,
and look with compassion upon all incoming freshmen, who will
never have the opportunity to bask in his presence. As Robert
S. Fink, '69, unpublished campus poet, noted earlier this year,
"Doc Ohms moved me."
The doctor's early career at the University is shrouded in
obscurity. Arriving in Ann Arbor determined to pursue a career
of healing, Ohms proceeded to compile a flat 2.0 average, and
was asked to repeat Chem 104 for a full appreciation of its in-
tricacies. But the Ohms never lost heart. As he put it, "As long
as I can get into any medical school, I'm sure my bedside manner'
will see me through."
This, unbeknownst to the doctor, was a true insight. The
presence of Doe Ohms, wheezing and complaining about his
chronic cardiac condition, was peculiarly comforting to a
suffering miscreant. The sight of the Doctor, nervously
brushing back his cowlick and worrying over his nose, was a
constant ministration to those of us who were wearying of
the Unconventional.
For the secret of the doctor lay in his extreme conven-
tionality. Ohms pursued the conformist line sq arduously
that he transcended it., His fierce desire to become a face in
the crowd led him, unerringly, to his crowning achievement,
the genesis of a new language-Ohmsian English.
But, as with so niany things, Ohms remained unaware of his
own following (or, as he would put it, "received no fire notices").
His humble ways stood untouched, and through his sophomore
year, the beacon of, medicine lay ever before him as a signpost
to the straight and narrow.
In his junior year, Doc Ohms placed his medical career
on the line by enrolling in an organic chemistry course. Two
months later he disenrolled. Eleven points out of a'possible 200.on
an houi'ly convinced him, at long last, that his place was not next
to Hippocrates.
The doctor, perplexed, looked about for new well-trod
paths. Seeking counsel from many, he finally decided to re-
turn to this city of his birth to receive the words of wisdom
he knew would lie herein.
Two days later he returned with a message for his co-
horts: Doe Ohms would enter the legal profession. His dis
ciples were stunned momentarily, but soon realized the in-
evitability of this decision. What could be more convention-
al, more completely predictable? They rejoiced; the doctor
had not strayed.
Graduation last April came as an anticlimax to him. Spend-
ing the second semester warding off the attentions of two beau-
tiful women, the good doctor laid plans with a close conrade
to spend the summer conventionally; visiting the capitals of' Eu-
rope. Typically, he was last heard from motoring away from Paris
as his fellow students led the anti-Gaullist revolt.
The. good doctor has left Michigan now, but his legacy lives
on. It is hard to summarize his achievements, for how does
one measure consummate conformity? Fink, recalling him,
remembers particularly his words of farewell: "I'm moved
by you, Bobby boy."

4

Uh

The mainstay of the Wolverines
was their casual star goalkeeper
Jim Keough. While not gaining
wide national acclaim because of
an abundance pf superb netmind-
ers operatingin the league,
Keough was one of the strongest
and certainly thesbusiest of the
circuit's top goalies.,
Michigan was unquestionably a
late starting hockey team usually
taking a period or more to get
untracked and then playing their
most outstanding hockey ,in the
third period, and nobody felt the
brunt of their slow starts more
than Keough.
This was especially true in two
trips to East Lansing when a
smaller and slower Spartan team
issued a flurry of shots at the
Michigan goal in the opening
period while Keough was called
on to keep the Wolverines in the
game.
Graduation losses - although
not heavy-will leave their mark
on this year's team. They will
most sorely miss their high scor-
ing and hard hitting forward Lee
Martilla, who rejoined the team
after Christmas to spearhead the
Wolverine attack, and last year's
captain, defenseman Bill Lord, a
bone crushing checker.
The offense has also lost two
of its steadiest performers in the
graduations of speedy center
Bruce Koviak and winger Ron
Ullyot. Back up goaltender Harold
Herman, who saw only very lim-

ited service' last year, is the only
other non-returning: letterman.
The Wolverines then, having
lost only four regulars, have a
fire nucleus of veterans around
which they can build their title
hopes for 1968-69.
This season goalie Keough
should have a solid defense in
front of him as the experienced
trio of seniors Lars Hansen, Phil
Gross, and captain Paul Domm
will anchor Renfrew's blue line
corps.
The offense will be lead by last
year's team scoring leader Doug
Galbraith, a brilliant opportunist
in front of the opposition goal,
and the always hustling Randy
Binnie,' the tear's only other sen-
ior forward.
Wolverine fortunes will depend
heavily on threerforwards-Don
Deeks, Dave Perrin, and Doug
Glendining-'who last season as
sophomores showed flashes of
briliance. Deeks showed himself
to be a tireless forechecker while
both Glendining and Perrin often
exhibited speed and finesse that
might this year bring back mem-
ories of Mel Wakabayashi and
Red Berenson.
The outlook is good for a strong
showing by an experienced Mich-
igan team. The only discouraging
note is that NCAA champion Den-
ver's graduation losses numbered
only three. At least this year these
two teams will square off at the
Coliseum, where the Wolverines
never succumb without a grueling
struggle.

x

.i

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