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September 29, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-29

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Sunday, September 29, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Sunday, September 29, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
NATIONAL GENERAL CO~PORATtON -

Paae Three

FOX EASTERN THATRES~~
FOX VILLaGiE
375 No. MAPLE R. 769.1300
NOW StH6WING

Nixon proposes increased

U Thant calls

j MON.-FRL-7:.1-9:15 t
SAT.-SUN-- 1:15-3:15-5 15-710915e cr l
JULIE G EORGE' C.
I-IISTI -.s~cOT[ MIAMI, Fla. iP-Richard M. Vice President Hubert H. Hum-
Nixon proposed yesterday an in- phrey, called for a 50 per cent
crease in Social Security benefits boost in Social Security payments
Irv Aswover the next four years, a broad-
thewith an automatic boost in pen- ening of Medicare and, like Nixon,
..the uncommon movie.. __ _ nnofMdcradlkNin,,

Giant
pfront any photo

al

sions whenever the cost of living
goes up.
The Republican presidential
candidate also pledged to call a
Wpiite House conference on the
problems of Americans over 65 to
find "a new role foi' the older
generation."
Nixon disclosed his plan for
older citizens in a statement is-
sued at his Key Biscayne resort
headquarters, while he took a two
day break from his campaign in
a state that is a haven for retired
people.
His proposal came a few days
after his Democratic opponent

cost of living boosts for pensioners.
In his statement, Nixon saidj
there are 20 million Americans
over 65, people who have "brought
themselves, their families and
their country through the most
turbulent period in human his-
tory."
Now, he said, they are faced
with inflation caused by the Dem-
ocrats. "Fiscal mismanagement of
the old spend-spend, elect-elect
school of politics has gravely in-
jured the aged," he said.
In addition to raising pensions
Nixon called for:
-Eventual limitations on in-

Greek people to vote
onnew constitution

2$ft.z3 ft.
only 15
(4.95 alts.)
*Send any black & white or color
photo (no negatives) and the name
"Swingline"cut out from any Swizrgline
package (or reasonable facsimile) to:
POSTER-MART, P.O. Box 165,
Woodside, N.Y. 11377. Enclose $1.95
cash, check, or money order (no
C.O.D.'s). Add sales tax where appli-
cable.
Poster rolled and mailed (post-
paid) in sturdy tube. ypriginal mate-
rial returned undamaged. Satisfaction
guaranteed.
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At any stationery, variety, or boo store.
S.. 1 11? I l . INC
LONG ISLAND CITY, N.Y. 111O
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING QUICK RESULTS

ATHENS (M-The Greek regime
ordered military and police units
on alert yesterday and issued a
last-minute appeal for a massive
"yes" vote in' Sunday's constitu-
tional referendum..
With the referendum seen as a
geseture of confidence in the men
who eized Dower 17 months ago,
Premier George Papadopoulos ap-
pealed to the more than five mil-
lion eligible voters to go to the
polls "calm, steadfast and op-
timistic."
He, spoke in a nationwide radio
and television address. At the
same time, Foreign Minister Pa-
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Betweeg Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
NOW SHOWING
Feature
Wed.-Sat.-Sun.
1-3-5-7-9
Mon.-Tues.-Thurs.-Fri.
7-9
i PAU 14WMAN prouctionof
achel.
rniwui;s
OLO~fIMWuualsqfwJggg

nayiotis Pipenelis pleaded for
other countries to help the regime
by easing opposition.
Both termed the constitution a
first step toward parliamentary
rule.
The proposed charter strips the
monarchy of any real power, pro-
vides for a strong executive, aI
powerless parliament and vastly
increased authority' for the mili-
tary. There is no time table for
eventuial elections.
He insisted that despite the
existence of martial law, "the
refrendum is free, without any
pressure. The people can vote 'ac-
cording to their conscience."
The constitution is expected to
win overwhelming approval in the
balloting, to run from sunrise to
sunset. But the regime was taking
no chances.
All open opposition was foroid-
den. Soldiers and police stood by
to quell any possible demonstra-
tionofedissent. Extra buses, trains
and ships, were laid on in a final
stepped-up effort to get all eli-
gible voters back to their homes
in time\to cast ballots.
With all these preparations and'
a two-month campaign before the
vote, anything less than over-
whelming approval will be seen 6's
a rejection of the regime. Quali-
fied observers predicted at least
70 per cent of the voters would
accept the constitution.
Few Greeks had any doubt
about the outcome should-the con-
stitution be turned down. Deputy
Premier Stylianos Patakos said
Friday that in event of a rejec-
tion: "We would be obliged to'
draft a new fonstitution, but Un-
der conditions of more discipline."
The weather forecast is warm
and sunny. Vpters will be asked
to cast one of two ballots given
them. The ballots say simply "nai"
yes and "oxi" no.

iensions
come that Social Security reci-
pients are permitted to earn while
receiving pensions. For the pres-
ent. Nixon proposed increasing
the limit.
-A boost in widow's benefits,
from the present 82 per cent of
her late husband's pension to 100
per cent.
-Extension of Social Security
benefits to everyone over 65,
whether or not they pay taxes into
the Social Security fund. At pres-
ent, everyone over 72 is eligible.
-Restoration of the 100 per
cent, income tax deduction that
those 65 or older could once claim
for many drug and medical ex-
penses.
Nixon also talked of the social
problems of old age-"how to fill
empty hours."f
Nixon talked about the need for
adequate housing, and said pres-
ent government programs "tend
to, overlap and in 'some instances
they bear unnecessary restric-
tions."
"Pi:rivate enterprise and volun-
t organizations need encourage-
ment to build and maintain more
and better housing and nursing
facilities for older people in a
wider range of income groups."
said Nixon.
In the morning, Humphrey
backers sent a light plane circling
around the luxury beach-front
hotel where the GOP candidate is
staying-blaring out a challenge
for a Humphrey-Nixon debate.
"Nixon afraid to debate Hum-
phrey? Why?" was the message.
Outside his hotel, about 25 Hum-
phrey supporters paraded briefly,
accompanied by a loudspeaker
truck proclaiming the same mes-
sage.
Nixon has said he won't debate
Humphrey on television as long as
Federal Communications Com-
mission equal time rules require
that third party candidate George
Wallace share the platform.
World new
By The Associated Press
BONN Germany - President
Charles de Gaulle told the West
Germans in the wind-up of friend-
ship talks yesterday the European
Common Market would fall apart
if its members bypass France to
admit Britain and 'other appli-
cants.
France can'get along without
the Common Market, De Gaulle
said, but the Common Market can-
not live without France.
In those sharp terms to Chan-
cellor Kurt George Kiesinger, De
Gaulle shunted aside the demands
of Germans and others for "n en-
larged market for greater Euro-
pean unity, and, with Kiesinger,:
agreed that French-German re-
lations are to be considered first.
De Gaulle and Kiesinger gave
fresh pledges of "preferential soli-

By the Associated Press
U.N. Secretary-General U Thant accused U.S. diplomat
George W. Ball yesterday of "surprising misunderstanding
and misconception" of his widely publicized views on what an
end to all U.S. bombing of North Vietnam would accomplish.
Thant's comments came the day after Ball left the post of
U.S. chief U.N. delegate to join Vice President Hubert H.
Humphrey as the Democratic presidential candidate's chief
foreign policy adviser.
Ball said at a news conference shortly before he left the
U.S. delegation that he did not accept Thant's idea that
stopping all the United States' bombing of North Vietnam
was an essential first step toward progress in the Paris peace
talks between the two.

I
t

-Associated Press
Nixon in Florida
Republican presidental nominee Richard M. Nixon and his wife
Pat arriving at Orlando, Fla., for an airport rally. Nixon later
made a major address at Tampa and then flew to Miami for a
week vacation.
18 ARRESTED:
Cubans claim CIA
spy network broken
HAVANA A'P-The Cuban gov- 'onetime illegal entrant in Cuba
ernment announced yesterday it 'who now operates out of Miami.
has broken a spy ring it claims 'The ministry said he sent two
was organized by the U.S. Central agents to Havana a year ago, but
Intelligence Agency and arrested they were captured during the
18 persons, five of them women. August, 1967, conference of the
The Interior Ministry said the Latin American Solidarity Organ-
ring obtained information about ization, an international leftist
Cuba's armed strength, the 1970 group.
sugar crop,. ship movements and The Communist party news-
oil supplies and sent it to the paper Granma and semiofficial
United States on radio equipment organ El Mundo carried photo-
supplied by the CIA. graphs of radio transmitters, codes
It said the spy network was or- and special writing paper for in-
ganized by Manuel "Binchince" de visible ink that the government
'los Santos Garcia Ramirez, a claimed was supplied to the ring
by the CIA.
The Interior Ministry said the
information the spies obtained
rndupwas to be used "fundamentally in
ernment to frustrate the economic
development of our country and
darity" and "preferential coopera- to carry out acts of sabotage on
tion." 'They also agreed to important lines of our economy."
strengthen the 1963 friendship In Washington, a spokesman
pact under which they were meet- said the State Department would
ing in one of their semiannual have no comment.
get-togethers.

Ball

Ball said it was a "naive as-
sumption that if we were to stop
the bombing the whole world
would be suddenly transformed."
He declared the bombing issue
had been "enormously distorted
and blowp way out of life size."
A U.N. spokesman, quoting
these remarks, told reporters: "U
Thant has observed that the dis-
tortion in this context reflect Mr.
Ball's own surprising misunder-
standing and misconception inso-
far as the views of the secretary-
general on this matter are con-
cerned."
The spokesman had summoned
reporters to read them what
Thant had told some newsmen
when he arrived for work. On that.
occasion, answering the charge
about a "naive assumption,"
Thant retorted: "I have n e v e ri
claimed that once the bombing
of North Vietnam ceases, there
will be heaven on earth the next
day.
"What I have been saying is
that the cessation of .the bombing
of North Vietnam could generate
further steps which eventually
would bring about a peaceful set-,
tlement."
In other U.N. developments,
Secretary of State Dean Rusk flies
to New York today for a busy
round of meetings with foreign
ministers and the first high-level
U.S.-Soviet parley since the Rus-
sian invasion of Czechoslovakia.

'naive'

on bomb

halt

Jobs bil
faces stiff
WASHINGTON W)-The year-
long Senate drive to enact' a big
government jobs program for low-
income and unemployed Amer-
icans seems to have reached a
dead end.
Sen. Joseph S. Clark (D-Pa),
author of the major jobs bill,
conceded in an interview that he
sees only a slim chance for the
proposal now that final adjourn-
ment of Congress is near.
Clark noted that he had cut
back sharply on the plan he ori-
ginally introduced in the Senate
last February. But this has not
been enough to persuade Senate
leaders to schedule action on the
proposal, opposed by the Johnson
administration.
Clark conducted extensive hear-
ings on the measure before a
labor subcommittee he heads and=
won wide support for it from a
variety of groups. But the admin-
istration. fought it because of the
budgetary bind resulting from the
Vietnam war.
The Pennsylvanian was unable
to get a favorable vote from the
full Labor Committee, however,
because of the press of other busi-
ness and absenteeism in that
panel.
He then turned to the strategy
of offering it as a floor amend-
ment to a'bill extending the man-
power training . rogram which al-
so seeks to aid the unemployed by
increasing their skills.
This legislation has been before
the Senate since July but Demo-
cratic Leader Mike Mansfield of
Montana has declined to call it
up for action.
Mansfield told a reporter he is
unlikely to do so as long as the
threat of a jobs amendment hangs
over it.
Clark said he is quite willing to
enter into an agreement to limit
debate on his proposal but that he
is not going to abandon it.

H

d-l 1 0 1

w 'I 1

Saturday and Sunday
- THE

Pf

LAGOS - The Biafrans haved
adopted a "fight or die" attitude ' O
that could end Nigeria's 15- e
month-old civil war in one of!
Africa's biggest blood baths. 10 est pQ l
Instead of breaking Etheir spirit,
staggering casualties, slow star- CHICAGO (')--Thou'sands of
vation and the loss of nine-tenths marchers, mostly white and well
of the secessionists' territory seem dressed, paraded peacefully down
to have made them more stub- Michigan Avenue yesterday in a
born. demonstration against the war in
For a month now Nigerian for- Vietnam and police action during
ces have been pressing'their "final the Democratic National Conven-
assault" on the Biafran head- tion.
quarters at Umuahia. The rebels The demonstrators, 5 to 10
have counterattacked strongly on abreast, and strung out for more
at least three fronts and cap- than 10 blocks, strolled quietly,
tured one town, reliable sources patrolled by their own marshals
reported Saturday. and 1,000 police.
"The war is far from ending. " A police sergeant estimated the
insisted Biafran leader Lt. Col. crowd at more than 12,000.
C. Odumegwu Ojukwu. "In fact Hundreds of signs .were held
it is just beginning." aloft calling for an end to the
A h

mons trators
rCe, Viet war
war and "police aggression." One
sign asked the police to join in
the march.
The parade and a rally in Grant
Park were organized to mark the
one-month anniversary of conven-
tion, week confrontations between
police and anti-war demonstra-
tors.
Hundreds of persons were in-
jured in the clashes last month
which police critics described as
brutal repression.
The parade and rally were or-
ganized by the Chicago Peace
Council and the Citizens for Free
Chicago.

I

FUGITIVE KIND
Directed by Sidney Lumet, 1960
Starring
JOANNE WOODWARD
MARLON BRANDO ANNA MAGNANI
Adapted from Tennessee Williamns'
play "Orpheus Descending"
"Some women burn men out. I burn
women out."--Val Xavjer (Marion Brando)

11

and ...ftrmg
.1AI.WM PCT&IS,

NOW

INGER ROMW...R¬ęBERTS's
!Wain4W *WdhMIB6 I
- . irDWAL A -Urn. i P "hlfl l T1

-TATITW.b

TODAY AT
1,3, 5, 7,9 P.M.

'Belle de Jour' is sensational,
let's be honest-turn you on !"
-Lie an~

I

If

7:00 & 9:05
662-8871

75c

ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

IFC COMMENTARY '68
Debate: DR. TIMOTHY LEARY
vs.
DR. SIDNEY COHEN
Tickets: $1.50 Available in Lobby of S.A.B.
HILL AUDITORIUM-Oct. 6-800 P.M.
Monday thru Friday 9-4
or at
Hill Box Office after 5 on Oct. 6

, .

I

I

Wednesdaythru Saturday
YOCTOBER 2-5
f . f .. : .S;:.}%.:: : :f :" :{ :::::

SHOWS AT
1:00-3:60-5:00
7:10-9:20
(Feature 10
minutes later)

ATE

NEXT-
PAPER
LION

JOHNNY
CARSON

In Person
October 5

i you passed her on the street
you wouldn't notice her...on the
screen she is unforgettable.
4j f
t r
"t ti l 't _ jt ! S

aI

at
7:00 & 10:00 P.M.
University Events Bldg.

I

I

TICKETS:

$5 (sold oyt), $4, $3

MAIL ORDERS to Johnny Carson Show,
1024 Administration Bldi.,

.:. ".: ..
>:;5::5 ?:>:. .:"_::::: ;:::::y;s::;:<;: -YX: <'+ S : r:.:::,,,h>:":tr:::,},"f':ic ;":}: ; , :" ,cz : :"r. ;'.""rn :a ?.;;;:;x
. ;.;,;sax: ..
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