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September 28, 1968 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-28

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, September 28, 1968

Page.. ...... ,T MC G D IS

Hang

on

to

your

hopes, vi
STheLineups
I Defense

tdor y

may

be

iU

sight

field goal. This year, with record-
setting Brown leading the way, the
Wolverines hope to once again be
on the long end when the final
results are tallied.
However, Michigan will be
fighting an uphill battle, as Duke
this week has the momentum' of
an upset opening game win over
South Carolina, while the Wolver-
ines dropped their opener to the
California Golden Bears.
Nevertheless, the Michiganders
hope to take advantage of their
superior personnel, in showing
their neighbors from south of the
Mason-Dixon line how football is
played in the Midwest.
After all, Blue Devil coach Tom
Harp himself said that the Duke
victory over S.C. was "a freak"
and that his highest hope for to-
day's game is to "keep up with the
Wolverines."-
Fat chance. Duke's great
strength is in it's passing game,
and it's well known that Michi-
gan's high card is its defensive
backfield. Stalwarts George Hoey,
Tom Curtis, Brian Healy and ei-
ther Bob Wedge or Jerry HartmanI
will be able to more than protect
the Wolverine goal line against
any aerial attack.
Their two interceptions against
California last Saturday demon-
strated their ability and Michigan'
coach Chalmers "Bump" Elliott
expects nothing less in today's
tilt.

(88)
(76)
(60)
(52)
(61)
(72)
(80)
(22)
(18)
(40)
(48)
(91)
(65)
(90)
(94)
(97)
(74)
(84)
(24)
(25)
(38)
(12)

MICHIGAN
Jim Mandich
Bob Penska
Bob Baumgartner
Dave Denzin
Stan Broadnax
Dan Dierdorf
Bill Harris
Dennis Brown
John Gabler
Ron Johnson
Garvie Craw
MICHIGAN
Phil Seymour
Tom Goss
Tom Stincic
Jerr Miklos
Ed Moore
Dan Parks
Jim Wilhite
Brian Healy
Tom Curtis
Bob Wedge
George Hoey

TE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
SE
QB
Fl
TB
FB

(28)
(74)
(67)
(76)
(60)
(62)
(89)
(10)
(86)
(41)
(36)

DUKE
Jim Dearth
Ken Bombard
Ken Homa
Gene DeBolt
J. B. Edwards
Don Gunter
Henley Carter
Leo Hart
Marcel Courtillet
Wes Chessorr.
Don Baglien

TE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
WE
QB
FI
TB
FB
ISE
LE
LT
LLB
MG
RLB
RT
RE
LCB
RCB
LS
RS

Gibson sets ERA mark; Nats whip Tigers

Offense

JIM MANDICH

Although hampered by a pair of
key injuries in last week's game,
the Blue defensive line, with one
game under its collective belt,
hopes to be able to contain the
rushes of Duke's strong sophomore
fullback, John 'Cappellano.
On the other side of the -coin,
the Duke defensive squad will
more than have its hands full with
Michigan's hard-driving fullback
Ron Johnson and the Wolverines'
pass-run, run-pass quarterback
Dennis Brown. And as if that
weren't enough, Garvie Craw,
Michigan's junior "find" at full-
back, can be counted on to serous-
ly dent the Blue Devil line at will.

LE
LT
LLB
MG
RLB
RT
RE
LCB
LS
RS
RCB

DUKE
(88) George. Joseph
(75) Frank Lilly
(64) Dick Biddle
(63) Chuck Grace
(37) Ed Newman
(77) FrO& Zirkle
(85) Dan Rose
(15) Larry Davis
(14) Tom Edens
(29) Phil Singer
(23) Ed Hicklin

ST. LOUIS (?) - Bob Gibson
broke the National League record
for lowest earned run average
with a six-hit shutout that gave
the St. Louis Cardinals a 1-0 vic-
tory over the Houston Astros last
night.
Gibson, 22-9, making his last
start before the World Series, low-
ered his ERA to 1.12, breaking the
record of 1.22 held by Grover
Cleveland Alexander of the Phila-
delphia Phillies in 1915. Hub
Leonard of Boston holds the major
league ERA record of 1.01 for 222
innings set in 1914.
Gibson, whose 22 victories is the
most he has ever won in the ma-
jors, broke the major league ERA
record for 300 or more innings
pitched. Walter Johnson set the
mark of 1.14 in 1913 with the
Washington Senators. Gibson has
pitched 304 innings.
The 33-year-old Cardinal right-
hander turned in his 13th shutout
of the season and struck out 11.
DETROIT (P)-Frank Howard'sj
44th homer leading off the sev-
enth inning against reliever Pat
Dobson broke a tie and the Wash-
iAgton Senators trimmed thel
World Series-bound Detroit Tigers
3-1 last night.
Joe Coleman scattered six hits
for his 12th victory against 16
losses-
Norm Cash homered for 'De-
troit's run in the second. It was
his 25th.
-- -3

Il
A
f
l
t
i

Right end George Joseph is able" starter, the remainder of
Duke's only returnee from last the defensive squad will have to
season on the defensive line, and pick up the slack. But after view_-
the other members of the Blue ing this week's practice sessions,
Devil line have had only the in- it is apparent that middle guard
consequential experience of the Jerry. Miklos, right tackle Dan
"freak" win over South Carolina. Parks and right end Phil Seymour
While the loss of end John Kra- will be more than equal to the
mer will definitely hamper Mich- task. And on the left, substitutes
igan's defensive outlook, and with Jim Wilhite at end and Henry
Tom Goss listed only as a "prob- Hill at tackle will be able to hold
their own.
In the final analysis, it looks
/ /r)like 'a battered but ready Michi-
u l foes gan eleven will take the Duke
Blue Devils for the second straight
as Simpson ran for 235 yards and year.
four touchdowns. ---- - -

STORMIN' NORMAN CASH accounted for the only Tiger run as
they suffered a 3-1 defeat at the hands of Washington. The
,second-inning homer was the first-baseman's 25th round-tripper
of the season.

I

i

Major League StamnIi rgs

I'

DENNIS BROWN

f

AMEICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet.

NATIONAL LE4GUE

Big Ten clashes with powerf

(

By BILL CUSUMANO
The Big Ten 'has gained the re-
putation in recent years' of being
less than overpowering against
outside opponents.
This year, however, with sev-
eral teams being ranked in pre-
season polls the situation is sup-
posed to change. The conference
will go a long way toward discov-
ering whether they really are on
a par with the rest of the country
in today's big itersectonal
THE GAME, of course, is the
clash between Purdue and Notre
Dame, ranked No. 1 in the AP
and UPI polls respectively. The
contest has 'already been labeled
as the Poll' Bowl and the winner
will take a giant step toward the
national championship.
Purdue Will be led, as always,
by Mr. Everything, Leroy Keyes,
the All-American halfback. Keyes
will present his usual triple-threat
besides taking on the additional
duty of playing defense against
All-American end Jim Seyn our.
Stopping the Irish will not be
an "easy task though since Terry
Hanratty does the throwing for
them. Hanratty is probably the
best quarterback in the nation
and he leads a strong, experienced
offense.
Should the pasing game become
bogged/down, Hanratty can al-
ways rely on two"strong runners,
Bob Gladieux and Jeff Zimmer-
man, Zimmerman was particular-
ly effective irk- the Irish's 45-21
triumph over Oklahoma last Sa-
turday.
Women edged
* .#
to fi~94d hockey
By CORINNE R. KASS
Today the grass of Palmer field
took another turn for the brown,
as the Women's Ann Arbor field
Hockey team fell 2 to 1 to Guy-
ana, formerly British Guinea, in
an international field hockey
matceh.
The grass suffered most in the
first half in which all goals were
scored.: Guyana's center forward
and a lot of group effort tallied
the first goal for the gold and
white midway through the first
half.
Jean i~riedel, 'Ann Arbor's cent-
er halfback, retaliated minutes
later to tieup the game. But it
was back to the other end of the
field as Daphne Mclean scored
her second goal of the game.
In the second half, Ann Arbor's
eleven came back still breathing
hard, but not as hard or as strong
as Guyana. Most of the second 35
minutes was played in front of the
South American goal. Despite the
corners, (a kind of penalty shot),
Ann Arbor could not urge the
underweight croquet ball into the
net.
So ends another nightmare for
the groundskeepers.

Northwestern can only expect vrjrCrrn iPCr.

more of the same, plus having to ,JFIJ 1t OR T qjO
contend with the rest of the Tro-
jans' defending national champ- -*
ions. i'u1 a

1
f

xDetroit 103 57 .648 -
Baltimore 91 71 .565 1
Boston 36 74 .535 1
Cleveland 86 75 .531 l
New York 81 79 .509 2
yOakland 80 79 .503 2
y innesota 78 81 .491 2
yCalifornia 66 93 .415 3
yChicago 65 94 .409 2
Washington 63 96 .392 2
x-Clinched ;pennant.
y-Late game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 2, Baltimore 0
Boston 12, New York' 2
Washington 3, Detroit 1
Chicago at California, (night)
Minnesota at Oakland, (night)

13
17
22
22 '.

W
xSt. Louis 96
San Francisco 86
Cincinnati 82
Chicago Si
Atlanta 80
Pittsburgh 80
Los Angeles 75
Philadelphia 74
New York 72
Hous'ton 71
x--Clin4hed pennant.

L
64
73
77
78
79
79
85
85
88
89

Pct. GB
.597 -
.541 9
.516- 13
.509 14
.503 15
.503 15
.465 21
.465 21
.453 24
.447 25

JOHN ISENBARGER

BOB NAPONIC

While there is no doubt that
Notre Dame can score points,]
there is some worry about the de-1
fense. The Irish have a huge front
line led by 270 pound tackle Mike:
McCoy and there is no fear about1
this part of the defenders. ]
Concern arises over ,the second-
ary though. The pass defenders+
are young and so are the line-+
backers Oklahoma's Bob War-
mack connected for 172 yards and
three touchdowns against t h e m
last week.
Purdue must exploit this weak-7
ness in the Irish defense and they
have the man to do it in quarter-
back Mike Phipps. Phipps played
a spectacular game against Notre
Dame last year as a sophomore
while leading Purdue to victory.
He must duplicate that perform-
ance today for the Boilermakers to
triumph once again.
Kees will carry the burden of
the Boilermaker rushing 'attack
in addition to his other duties,
but he will get help from Perry
Williams, an exceptional fullback
in his own right, and Jimmy Kirk-
patrick, a kick-return artist.
Despite the offensive. talents
present, the defense should be the
key to the game, and Purdue is
particularly strong inathis area.
Ara Parseghian has already ex-
pressed worry about the tall,
strong Boilermaker line upsetting
Hanratty.
THE SECOND BIG game today
involves Indiana and Big Eight
power Kansas. The Jayhawks
bombed Illinois last week and are
seeking their second Big Ten
scalp.
Kansas is apparently over the
racial troubles of last spring and
has developed a steamroller of-
fense led by quarterback Bob
Douglass and halfback D o n n i e
Shanklin. Douglass dazzled the
Illini with a passing show and
Shanklin struck for several long
runs last week.
Indiana also lives by its offense
and for good reason. Tie Hoos-
iers rolled up 4Q points in their
opening victory over Baylor. How-
ever, it took a touchdown by
quarterback Harry Gonso in the
last 18 seconds to win.

Indiana has to roll up a lot of
points to win and they have the
tools, to do it. Gonso runs the
whole show with flanker J a d e
Butcher and unpredictable half-
back John Isenbarger in the sup-
porting roles.
Highly regarded Ohio State
opens its season against SMU in
Columbus. The Buckeyes are sup-
posed to be powerful this year as
Woody Hayes brings up a fine
gropp of sophomores led by quar-
terback Rex Kern. Kern is aided
by a strong group of running
backs who will continue the "three
yards and a cloud of dust" of-
fense.
SMU will give the Buckeyes a
stern test though with their po-
tent passing attack. Chuck Hixson
does the throwing while the re-
ceivers are led by little J e r r y
Levias, the first Negro to play
in the Southwestern Conference.
Iowa, upset winner over Ore-
gori State last week, also faces a
stern test from a SWC opponent.
TCU's Horned Frogs provide the
opposition and they will give Iowa
trouble.
Iowa's hopes rest on senior
quarterback Eddie Podolak and
sophomores Dennis Green ;and
Larry Lawrence. The Hawkeyes
also willbhave to hope for some
of the breaks they got against
Oregon State.
Northwestern must get superb
performances from halfback Chico
Kurzawski and the defense to stay
in the game.
The defense has the unenviable
task of trying to contain O. J.
Simpson. Minnesota got the
Orange Juice treatment last week

Minnesota will try to get on the
victory side of the ledger but it
will be a difficult task. Nebraska
provides the opposition for t h e
Gophers and they enter the game
ranked No. 9.
Minnesota must get better per-
formance from the defense which
let Simpson run wild last week.
Gopher hopes in this area rest1
upon end Bob Stein.1
The offense looked good in,
putfing 20 points, on the board
against Soutshern Cal and they
should hold their own. Sophomore,
fullback \1Barry Mayer could be
the key man as he must gain the
needed yardage against a tough
defense.
Michigan State took a surpris-
ing victory over Syracuse in their
opener and-hopes' are now high
in East Lansing. Quarterback Bill
Ferraco and halfback Tommy
Love both looked impressive
against the Orangemen and will
once again lead the offense.
The defenders must stop a Bay-
lor team that racked up 36 points
against Indiana and showed a
brilliant passing game. Unless the
aerial game can be stopped the
Spartans could be in for a long
afternoon.
Illinois looked hapless against
Kansas and now must face ano-
ther Big Eight school, Missouri.
The Illini have hope though as
Missouri fell to a poor Kentucky
team last week.
Quarterback Bob Naponic is
the man Illinois is counting on to
get them points, but he has little
help. The defense in particular is'
weak, but Missouri's deficiencies
at quarterback could make their
job easier.
Hapless Wisconsin probably,
wishes the season was over al-
ready. The Badgers were em-
barassed by Arizona State last
week, 55-7. In addition Wisconsin
gave up over 500 yards in offense.
The Badgers can only expect
more of the same treatment this
week as they face traditional Pa-
cific Coast power Washington.

PITPTBRGH -t -Piratep third- . who replacedrilHnk Baueir Or-#

baseman Maury Wills changed his
mind yesterday after\ threatening
to retire from baseball. The threat
came out of his dispute with Pi-
r ateegneral manager Joe Brown
after Wills failed to accompany
the team to Chicago for the last
three games of the season. He re-
fused because of a $150 fine levied
on him earlier in the week for
failing to appear for a routine
physical checkiup. After 'everal
conversations with Brown and a
request from Mayor Joseph M.
Barr, Wills agreed to join tl e
Pirates in Chicago today. HoW;-
ever, he added that he may retire
at the end of the season "espe-
cially if I'm not protected from
the draft."
BALTIMORE - Earl Weaver,

iole manager last July 11, has been
rehired for next season. He signed
a one-year contract yesterday
which raises his salary from $25,-,
000 to $25,500. When Weaver re-
placed Bauer, the Orioles were in
second place 10/2 games behind
Detroit. He piloted them to within
four games in late August before
the Detroit surge secured their
first pennant since 1945.
BOSTON-Boston Patriot full-
back Jim Nance will not play
in tomorrow's American football
League game with the Broncos at
Denver. The AFL's leading;g'round
gainer the past two years, Nance
twisted his ankle in a preseason
game against the Philadelphia 'a-
gles" If his ankle improyes, he will
rejoin the Patriots at Oakland in
two weeks.

TED SIMMONS, St. Louis Card catcher
( U.M. student)
Talks about the World Series with you
on the sports hotlines.
761-500
761-3501
761-3502
Call Monday at 7:30 P.M.
LISTEN TO-650 ON TH E DIAL

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 4, Pittsburgh 1
Los Angeles 5, Atlanta 2
St. Louis 1, Houston 0
I San Francisco 3, Cincinnati 2
Philadelphia 3, New York 2

Yy 1J G,.7Zrt~l li(11 ~a~i t'j !

01

&I

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WORSHIP

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist Convention
1 131 Church St.
761,0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.--Sunday School
S1 :0(1 a.m.-Moping Worship
6:30 p.m.-Training Union,
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship
FIRST CONGREGATIONA4 CHJURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Terry N. Smith, Minister
Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant r
Worship-service at 10:00 a.m.-Dr. John Pet-
ers, Director of World Neighbors will give
the sermon, '/Making the Gospel Relevant"
Church School through Sixth Grade

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
'.432 Washtenaw Ave.
Phone 662-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, John R.
Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY5
,Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m. I
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church
Pregcher-the Reverend Paul R. Dotson, Di-
rector, President and Ecumenical Center.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General Conf.
761-6749
Rev. Charles Johnson
9:30 a.m.-Coffee
9:45 a.m-U Fellowship Bible Discussion
-Stilt Possibilities in Our Confused World"
7:00 p.m.-"What Does Our-Singing Really
Mean?"
8:30 p.m--Campus and Careers fellowship
11:00 a.m.-"Assurance and Understanding
and refreshments
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Dr. Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Phyllis St. Louis, Minister of Education
9:20 & 11:00 a.m.-Sermon: "This Business
of 'Law and Order'"
Stydent Religious Liberals Program at 7:00,
p.m.-Discussion on Black Power

.1

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liowutowl
WENK Sales & Service, Inc:
310 East 665-8637
Washington 5 th6 ve
*Service entrance on 5th Ave.

ni Honda
We Have Them All
Big and Small
Stale, St.
S s Diiin St.
Service
Accessories ! : Ao
Parts _t
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t
k
C
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Put Your Car On A Dirt-Free Diet
You know it's clean because you do it yourself

Wash, Rinse and Wax!
5 Minutes - 25c
LIBERTY
CAR WASH

WA.Wer er
ute
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OPEN 2

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4 HOURS

MICH IGAN1
'SDUKE
Saturday 1:45 P.M.
Play-by-Play with
"The Voice of Michigan Football for 23 Years"
Special Half-Time Show Featuring

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 11:00 a.m.-Services.
Communion at 11:00.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta, Supper-
Program. Mr. Don Busarow, the use of
fok music in contemporary worship serv-
ices.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Devo-
tion, the Rev. Arthur Spomer, speaker.
Thursday, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m:-Course, "His-
tory and Literature of Israel"
Friday at 6:30 p.m.-Choir Practice.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Pastors: H. G. Kroehler, A. C. Bizer,
W. C. Wright
9:30 a.m.-Worship Service.
9:30 a.m.-Church School
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8-00 a.m.-Holy Communion
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon

FIRST CHURCH OFCHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHilRCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
M'inisters: Calvin S. Malefyt, Paul Swets
10:30 a.m.-"On Being Genuine," Dr. Calvin
Malefyt.
7:00 p.m.-"The Anabaptist Vision," J. C.
Wenger from Goschen Biblical Seminary."
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CIURCH and WESLEY
FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-6881
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and 11:15 a.m.---"Stewardship-
Is Response toT od's Love."
THURSDAY
Retreat Weekend-No evening program
FRIDAY
6:00 p.rn-Young Married's dinner and
program.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
12.00 noon-Lupcheon and Discussion: "A
Church for the Twentieth Century.",
6 :00_ p.m.-Wesley Grads-Dinner and Pro-
gram: "A Look at Contemporary Theology"
with Rev. Ronald Tipton.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
The Reverend Fred Holtfretoer
SUNDAY
1 1 :00 a.m.--Worship Service.
ST. AIDEN'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
i North'Campus 1
1679 Broadway
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Holy Com-
m union
11n:00 .m-Coffee in the lounge
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High

10:30 a m.--Worship Services, Sunday School
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 p.m.-Testimony Meeting
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon.' 10-9, Tues.-Sat. 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Bible Speaks to You," Radio WAAM
1600, Sunday, 8:00 a.m.
For transportation call 663-7321

318 W. Liberty St.

a

1v41.

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