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September 26, 1968 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-26

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Thursday, September 26, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Thursday, September 26, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

f

'

WHY CUSTER FAILED

Scouting crew indispensible

By PAT ATKINS
If General Custer could, he would un-
doubtably testify to the necessity of a de-
pendable, well-informed scouting crew.
Coach Bump Elliott can, and does.
"You couldn't play the game without
them," he says.
Each week of the football season, one or
more of four coaches follow a time-con-
suming and complex routine in hopes of
ascertaining a little bit more about up-'
coming opponents.
Coach DennisaFitzgerald, varsity defen-
sive line coach, hands out the forms that
scouts fill out while on assignment and is
in charge of the correlation of this mater-
ial. Scouting with' him are freshman coach
Bill Dodd, and assistant freshman coaches
Steve Kimball and Lewis Lee. These four
carry the primary responsibility of advance
scouting all of the Wolverines' season foesp
"The scouting coach of years past had a
different function th a n today's scout,"
Fitzgerald feels. "Now it is not strategy
that he co'ncentrates on because the whole
coaching staff works together on that.
"A scouVs major use is more in calculat-
ing statistical facts and looking at who
may not have played before." ,

The- amount of material scouts have to
keep track of would put the University's
red tape machine to shame. Other than
noticing the characteristics of the team be-
ing scouted, their enthusiasm, how they
block and tackle, their formation, defen-
sive allignment, size, speed, strengths,
weaknesses, and personnel; each scout
charts as much as possible what plays the
team calls in each down situation.
At the Big Ten games all this is done
by one coach.
A Big Ten rule states that in scouting
conference teams, a Big Ten member can
send one scout to view that specific team
only twice in the season.
"The Big Ten tries to have levity In its
rules. There's no need to scout a team ten
times," says Fitzgerald. "And every team
.exchanges game films with its opponent."
'Iwo scouts are usually sent to non-con-
ference games.
"Assignment to a particular team is
thought out by the coaching staff, with
the final decision resting on how well the
coach k n o w s a team, whether he has
scouted the team before, and what would
be best for the Wolverines," Elliott ex-
plains.

Generally, the coaches scout the team
for the two games previous to the Michi-
gan game. Then the Sunday before the
contest, the scouting coach reports his con-
clusions and recommendations to the whole
coaching staff.
"This session lasts from 9 a.m. to 10
p.m. Then on, Monday we go over it from
7 a.m. to 9:36 p.m. During this time and
the rest of the week we also view the game
films," Elliott says.
The team also receives this advance re-
port, verbally on Monday and in statistical
form on Tuesday.
By the day of the game, knowledge of
the statistics, formations, strengths, and
weaknesses, personnel, size and speed of
the opposition has become an instinct to
the Michigan team.
And the morning after, all this is for-
gotten in the intensity to investigate still
another brand of football through a scout-
ing report.
"If we played a team that had scouted
us, and we hadn't scouted them, it would
be no contest,' Elliott concludes.
Sort of a Little Big Horn repeat.

The Michigan coaching staff - (left to right) Hank Fonde, Bob Shaw, Tony Mason, Bump Elliott,
William Dodd, Frank Maloney, Dennis Fitzgerald, and George Mans.

...+
--- -- ---- - - -

v *t? {{4. $ ti.V.... . . -. ;;V . s '. :i:" ;}a . s'.y? . , ,Qfb A '.
Cards, Gibson rate . .
edge over igers
New week the monolithic autumnal television giant, football,
will be forced to withstand the heavy pressure from the climax
of another baseball season.
All will be forgotten on the trite filled gridiron as the time-
tested victors .of their leagues, the St. Louis Cardinal and the
Detroit Tigers clash, in a battle which is sure to capture the
imagination of the sporting public:
Fathers will regain their fanatical interest which lay dormant
during the long year, and the 'country will be swept into a frenzy
usually reserved for the beginning or ending of a war.
This particular World Series will feature an overworked, over-
publicized, but still interesting match between the two top pitchers
of record in recent memory, Dennis McLain, the best human
pitcher in baseball today has been utterly superb in developing
a 31-6 record while pitching 329 innings, 276 strikeouts, and 28
complete games' with a 1.97 ERA. McLain should be especially
4 effective against the Cardinals in St. Louis, for it is unlikely
that the Cardinals will supply the usual means 'to his donwfall,
the home run, in large Busch Stadium.
HOWEVER, Bob Gibson has been superhuman for the entire
season. Pitching'slightly less often witl baseball's best defense
backing him up, Gibson has created an' incredible 1.16 LRA
which .ranks among the, lowest in baseball history. In addition,
Gibson has shown himself to be one of the top World Series
pitchers ever by'winning'two Corvettes with his 5-1 mark between
the 1964 and 1967 Series.
Advantage to St. Louis, but by no means sure.;
The other pitching confrontations appear to be even. Ray
Washburn and Nelson Briles have been consistent winners all
year and'have earned run averages of 2.76 and 2.28 respectively.
Washburn in fact recently pitchesd a stunning no hitter against
San Francisco.
They will be opposed by the Tiger's pair of Mickey Lolich,'
,17-9, and Earl Wilson, 13-,12, who, although lacking the fine
earned run averages'of the Redbird pitchers, have recently
brought them far down from their mid-season marks. If Lolich
were to continue to develop to his fabulous form of late last
4k season, it, could be the deciding factor in the Series.
At the plate the Tigers have been much more prolific th'an the
Cardinals, ranking with Cincinnati as the top run-scoring team
in baseball. The most powerful team, in baseball, the Tigers have,
hit over 180 home runs as compared with but 70 homers for the
Cardinals.
However, these figures are a bit deceptive. While Tiger Sta-
dium's power alleys are among the shortest' in the majors, 365
-and 370 feet, Busch Stadium neasures 386 feet to each of its power
alleys. In addition, it is well known that the ball does not carry.
well in'St. Louis.
Hovever, tlie Tiger lineup is relatively slow and has only two
good average hitters in the lineup, Horton and Kaline. The bulk
of the players are hitting around M55, and the left side of the
infield is hitting below .200.
The Cardinals' on the other hand play a tight scratching
speed game which often enables them to pull out close games.
Lou Brock, Curt Flood, 'and Julian Javier are all much better
baserunners than any of the Tigers. However, the Redbirds big
power man, Orlando Cepeda, has had a rather poor season by
his standards, and the Cards have not scored as much as last year.
Taken as a whole, peither the Tigers lack of speed nor the
Cards lack of power should be a deficit if the teams can accom-
plish what was done all year. However, Bob Gibson should make
the Cardinals slight favorites, 5-4, on the basis of his spectacular
World Series record.-
--DAN STEINHARDT

Brown's homer in

9th

downs

BALTIMORE (:)-Gates Brown
unloaded a three-run homer in
the ninth inning that carried the
Detroit Tigers to a 4-3 victory
over the Baltimore Orioles last
nght.
Brown connected with one out
against Tom Phoebus after Jim
Northrup had singled and Norm
Cash reached base on Don Bu-
fprd's error.
Phoebus was working on a five-'
hitter before running into the
ninth inning trouble.
Ray Culp fired a six-hitter for
his fourth consecutive shut-out
last night as the Boston Red Sox
nipped Washington 1-0 to remain
deadlocked with Cleveland for
third place in the American
League.
Luis Tiant allowed one hit-a
first inning single by Mickey
Mantle-in hurling the Indians
past the New York Yankees 2-0 in
an afternoon game.
Culp ran his scoreless innings
string to 39, striking out 11 on
the way to his 16th triumph
against five losses. The Red Sox
nicked Jim Hannan for a first
inning run on singles by Mike An-
drews, Dalton Jones, and Carl
Yastrzemski.
Tiant, 21-9, also fanned 11 and
retired 18 Yankees in order in one
stretch. Due Sims doubled home
one Cleveland run in the third
and Dave Nelson drove in another
with a seventh inning triple.

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
JOEL BLOCK
Two homers by Mack Jones and
the two-hit pitching of Jim Ma-
loney paced Cincinnati to a 3-0
whitewash of Pittsburgh. Lee May
also homered for the Reds.
Nelson Briles drove in two runs
with a single and double but need-
ed ninth inning pitching help as
St. Louis edged Philadelphia 5-4
to end their losing streak at five
games.
Tom Seaver pitched a three-hit-
ter and Cleon Jones drilled three
hits, pacing the New York Mets
to a 3-0 victory over Atlanta.
Ron Santo crashed a grand
slam homer in the ninth, power-
ing the Chicago Cubs .past Los
Angeles 4-1.
Bob Aspromonte's run-scoring
single in the sevenith gave Hous-
ton a 3-2victory over San Fran-
cisco and 26-game winner Juan
Marichal.
Oakland led the Chicago White
Sox 1-0 after three innings and
Minnesota led California 3-2 in
the third.

4

IM Board to hear co

By DIANA ROMANCHUK 1
The Advisory Committee on
Recreation, Intramurals, and'Club
Sports voted unanimously Tues-
day to open next week's meeting
to the public.
Any organization or interested.
individuals will have an oppor-
tunity at 7:30 next Tuesday night
to voice their complaints and
criticisms in regard to the recre-
ational facilities on campus.
The committee has been work-
ing on a list of priorities since its
initial meeting three weeks ago-
but is still listening to suggested
additions.

cross-referencing could eliminate
duplications and uncover possi-
bilities for combination facilities.
The committee has already
taken action in two cases, geared
toward alleviating some of the
short-term problems.
Palmer Field, the most used coed
facility, has been scheduled for
immediate repairs. Portable equip
ment-including tennis nets, bas-
ketball backboards, and conver-
tible goals-has also been ordered.
President Robben Fleming along
with Vice-Presidents Allan Smith
and Wilbur Pierpont, were present
to discuss possible sources of fi-
nancing the necessary additions.

Orioles, "O
GO GO
BAHAMAS
mplamts , 10 FABULOUS DAYS
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opment. $19
One of the most successful ideas
has been the recreation pad, a Dec. 26th-Jan'. 4th
blacktopped surface which can be
used for several activities. Though I NCLU DES:
multi-purpose, problems arise be-.
cause they are not multi-usable at Round trip jet air fare
the same time. Rearrangement of 0 9 Nights accommoda-
the tennis courts and basketball tions at the famous
backboards could improve the sit- Freeport Inn
uatiofl.
Another generally-agreed upon 0 9 Great happy hours
necessity is lighting. Presently the
only lit field is Wines Field, and PLUS, PLUS, PLUS
with darkness falling earlier every
day, this severely limits the sched- $50 Holds Your Reservations
uling possibilities on such fields as
South Ferry. CALL:
According to Canham, "the pri- Your Campus Representative
,mary concern of this committee
'is to make the best functional use DICK RINI, 769-0226
of the space available." or
The job is divided between fu- STUDENTOURS, 886-0844
ture acquisition of land, and mul-
tiple-use of the present land.

A sub-committee composed of While Fleming felt gifts and
Rodney Grambeau, Intramural long-range funding by the Uni-
Director; M iss Marie Hartwig,logrnefdigbth n-
actg;ead of Womre's hysica versity might provide money, Pier-
acting head of Women's Physical pont also suggested borrowing
Education Department; Paul money increasing the student
Hunsicker,E e-head of Men ~ athletics fee (the $5 per term per
Physical Education Departmentstdnispenlyldgdoth
and now associate athletic director student is presently pledged to the
in control of physical education; AllEvents Building), or private
funds.
and David Mildner, representing The committee also reviewed a
the Michigan Sports' Club Asso- map of the facilities preparedby
ciation drew up the original list. the plant Department seeking to
However, the list has already gone
through several revisions.L:::,M:Y:.;;:..::s.:::...:i: :: ";1.
"We want to make sure every-
body contributes before we pull FOR FUN AND
the various needs into one com-
plete list," explained Don Can-
ham, Athletic Director and com- ~~
mittee chairman.
Once the list is compiled, money Read and Use
becomes the major limitation on,
how many of the needs can be ful-
filled. It will .be the advisory The Dia ly's
board's job to sort out the requests
and determine which are most
immediate.classified Ads!
Miss Hartwig suggested that.."..:..;.. .:::::::"::;;"::::"."::.;

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1

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W. L Pet.4
yDetroit 103 56 .648
Baltimore 90 70 .563
Boston 85 74 .535,
Cleveland 85 74 .535
New York 81 78 .509
xOakland 79 79 .500;
xMnnesota 77 81 487
xCaifornia 66 92 .418;
xChicago 65 93 -.411,
Washington 62 96 .392=
x-Late game not included.
y-Detroit clinched pennant.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 3, New York 0
Boston 1, Washington 0
Detroit 4, Baltimore 3
Chicago at Oakland, Inc.
Minnesota at California, inc.

NATIONAL LEAGi

GB
13
18
18
22
231.4
25Y2
36%
37 ;
401:,2

xSt. Louis
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Chicago
Atlanta
Pittsburgh
Los Angeles
Philadelphia
New York
Houston
x-Clinched pe

w
95
86
82
81
80
80
74
74
'72
71
pnnant.

L
64
73
77
87
'79
79
85
85
87
88

UJE
Pct. GB r
.597 -
.541 9
.516 13
.509 14
.503 15
.503 15
.465 21
.465 1
.453 3
.447 24

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 4, Los Angeles 1
Cincinnati 3, Pittsburgh 0
Houston 3, San Francisco 2
New York 3, Atlanta 0
St. Louis 5, Philadelphia 4

:

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