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September 22, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-22

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Sunday, September 22, 1968
CAMPAIGN AT PEAK?
Senators weigh Wallace threat

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

By The Associated Press
As third-party candidate George
C. Wallace told reporters in Mont-
gomery, Ala. the masses share his
concern about only two key issues
Onthis campaign--law and order,
and schools -- concerned senators
in Washington were predicting his
movemnent has reached. its peak
strength and will be on the down-
grade.
Wallace said that, partly as a
result of his campaign, which he
refers to as a movement, people
are likely to rise up and demand
local control of school policies

whether he wins in November orI
not.
"They're sick and tired of all
this anarchy," he said, "and
aren't going to put up with it."
He said it would not surprise
him if people held mass rallies "in'
groups of maybe 10,000 to 15,000
people and then the federal gov-
ernment will listen to our point
of view just as they are listening
to the anarchists -now."
IMPACT
Few Democrats or Republicans
doubt that the former Alabama
governor will have a strong im-
pact on the contest between GOP

GUILD HOUSE-801 Monroe

Mon., Sept. 23 NOON

LUNCHEON 25c

GERALD LUNDY
Black Public Relations, Detroit
"MILITANCY-
TELLING IT LIKE IT IS"
Tuesday, Sept. 24 NOON LUNCHEON
JCHARLES F. LEHMAN N
Associate Dean, School of Education
"THE UNIVERSITY AND
SOCIAL CHANGE"
S HbCib To
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

nominee Richard M. Nixon and
Democratic nominee Hubert H.
Humphrey - if he gains any-
where near the 20 per cent of the
popular vote some polls now indi-
cate.
A spot check of individual sen-
ators deeply involved in local
contests indicates that Wallace's
greatest threat to either candi-
date lies in the states that ring
the D e e p South - the states
which Nixon counts on to furnish
him the winning margin of elec-
toral votes.
Nixon himself has spotlighted
this problem by calling on Hum-
phrey to, repudiate any attempt
on the part of Southern Demo-
crats to combine with Wallace
forces in an attempt to throw the
presidential contest into t h e
House of Representatives.
BAD NEWS
Humphrey ignored t h is chal-
lenge except to say that Wallace's
candidacy is "bad news for the
United States."
In Tennessee, one of the critical
border areas, Sen. Howard H.
Baker Jr., working hard for Nixon,
said he thinks the GOP nominee
will win. But he does not rule out
the possibility that Wallace might
come out on top in the scramble
there for 11 electoral votes of the
270 needed for victory-
"The race is between Nixon and
Wallace in Tennessee," Baker
said. "I don't find any Humphrey
sentiment in the state."
Meanwhile, in Montgomery, the
former Alabama governor, whose
administration was marked by his
defiant stand against federal
school integration orders, said
state officials have the authority
to take over physical control of
schools to protect citizens.

Malay youths
Maly raid embassy
400 mar'ch on Philip pinies Conisulate,
rally at home of prime minister,
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia ( -- Malaysia's dispute with the
Philippines over ownership of Sabah erupted yesterday into an at-
tack by Malaysian students on the grounds of the Philippines Embas-
sy in Kuala Lumpur.
About 400 students, charging through the embassy gates unhin-
dered, ripped down the Philippines flag and hoisted a crude drawing
depicting Ferdinand Marcos, president of the Philippines, as a pirate.
The students then marched tot the residence of Prime Minister
Tunku Abdul Rahman where they won his praise.
"Malaysia needs this kind of spirit," he told them. "We appre-
ciate this spirit to show that you are going to defend Malaysia."
But the prime minister told newsmen yesterday night he was
unaware the students had invaded the embassy grounds and had
torn down the flag.
He indicated he thought the students had come to his home in
demonstration of support and that "

Tear gas in Uruguay
Police fired cannisters of tear gas at demonstrating students of the University of the Republic in
Montevideo, Uruguay yesterday. One student was shot to death and several others seriously
wounded in campus disturbances.
LONG DISPUTE SEEN:
Report supports. Fortas

Univesty
esPlayers
Department
of
Speech
]present

WASHINGTON (R') - Outlines
for a prolonged and harsh Senate
dispute over the nomination of
Abe Fortas to be chief justice
were drawn more sharply yester-
day. His supporters described him
as a man of extraordinary excel-
lence while his foes blamed him
and the Supreme Court for a host
of national ills.
A report speaking for the major-
ity of the Senate Judiciary Com-
mittee which approved the nom-
ination 11 to 6 had high praise
for the man who has been an as-
sociate justice of the Supreme
Court since 1965. And it sought
to refute various arguments ad-
vanced against him.
But four dissenting Southern
members issued individual state-
ments which made it clear that
his opponents will seek to indict
not only Fortas' decisions and
conduct but will try also to dis-j
credit the court's course of recent
years.1
This assured that the debate
opening next week not only will
be prolonged as Fortas's foes seek
to block a vote by filibustering
but will be a rough-and-tumble
affair centering on issues of high
emotional content.
Fortas was named by President
Johnson last June to succeed
Chief Justice Earl Warren who.
submitted a retirement letter to
become effective at the Presi-
dent's pleasure. Johnson made
the retirement contingent upon
confirmation of Warren's succes-
sor and if Fortas is blocked War-
ren is expected to continue in of-
fice.

At the same time, Johnson nom-
inated U.S. Circuit Judge Homer
T. Thornberry to the court vacan-
cy that would be created by War-
ren's retirement. But the Judi-
ciary Committee postponed action
on Thornberry pending settle-
ment of the Fortas case.
The majority report described
Fortas as "a symbol of leader-
ship in the law and progress in
our society." It found him to be
"a man of extraordinary excel-
lence and his nbmination . . . one
of unusual and high distinction."
Referring to the threat of a
filibuster under the leadership of

Sen. Robert P. Griffin, (R-Mich),
the report called on senators to
"shun support of such an igno-
ble vernture." But Griffin and
his allies remained confident For-
tas supporters can not rally the
two-thirds majority needed to cut
off debate and force a vote.
The majority report sought in
several ways to dispose of the
main arguments against confir-
mation.
To charges against Fortas for
not discussing decisions with hos-
tile committee members, for in-
stance, the report said this wou.d
threaten the independence of the
judiciary.

he was praising them for that.
NO PROTESTS
Rahman said his government
would assure the Philippines that
protests or demonstrations would
no longer be permitted at the em-
bassy in Kuala Lumpur.
"We are going to tell them it
won't occur again," the prime
minister i n f o r m e d newsmen.
"There will be a greater security
guard against such a thing hap-
pening. I regret that it -has hap-
pened."
Rahman spoke to newsmen af-
ter word reached here that the
Marcos government had lodged a
"strong protest" with the with-
drawing Malaysian ambassador in
Manila.
SUSPEND RELATIONS
Malaysian suspended diplomat-
ic relations with the Philippines
after Marcos signed a bill annex-
ing the Malaysian state of Sabah
in North Borneo.
The student attack followed a
wave of demonstrations across
Malaysia Friday in support of
Prime Minister Rahman's stand
in denouncing the Philippines law
on Sabah.

world news roundup

Soviet-led
occpaion
to Pull out
PRAGUE (A)-Czechoslovakia's
leadership gave out word yester-
day that Soviet-led occupation
troops will start gradual with-
drawals within a few days but
"certain contingents" will remain.
Citizens also were told they need
have no fear of expressing their
political opinions.
News of pending pullouts of
troops who invaded just a month
ago came from Premier Oldrich
Cernik in a speech to Communist
party officials and workers in
Istrava, a big mining center in
Silesia.
His remarks were reported by
Radio Prague.
"In the next few days, the
gradual withdrawal of foreign
troops from our /territory will take
place," he was quoted as saying.
"But certain contingents of the
armies will stay with us-how
many and for how long, the pub-
lic will learn in due time.",
Cernik, followed by Alexander
Dubcek, the Communist party's
first secretary and chief architect
of the nation's reform policies,
pledged a government which will
work to keep the air free for poli-
tical expression.
"The answer to Ivoices saying
we did not face up resolutely
enough against rightist elements
is that nobody can expect that we
will use the same methods as the
fifties," Cernik declared. "We will
not punish anybody for his polit-
ical opinions.
"Only those will be punished
who transgress our valid laws."
Said Dubcek: "It is important
to create an atmosphere in which
people will not fear to speak their
opinions in public."
The radio quoted him as saying
that socialism enjoys a firm posi-
tion in Czechoslovakia and the
people will not accept non-So-
cialist ideas.
Those party functionaries who
manage to win the support of the
people by their positions on timely
problems are the ones who should
gain influence, he said.

SAIGON (P) - Two thousand
U.S. Marines backed up by Amer-
ica's largest bombers pressed a
double-barreled assault yesterday
against North Vietnamese a r m y
units trying to enter South Viet-
nam across the demilitarized zone.
The Leathernecks, in the fifth
day of a massive sweep through
the once-neutral buffer zone, re-
ported light contact with the en-
emy as they methodically de-
stroyed well-engineered bunkers
and infiltration trails.
U.S. spokesmen said that since
the Marines were landed by heli-
copter in the DMZ Tuesday, they
have killed 68 North Vietnamese
soldiers at a cost of two Marines
killed and 20 wounded .

While the Marines swept
through the mountainous central
area of the DMZ, U.S. B-52 bomb-
ers have been flying daily strikes
on the eastern flank of the zone,
about seven miles inland from
the coast, and over the south-
ern edge of North Vietnam.
* * *
MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay --
Authorities feared further rioting
as students prepared for the fun-
eral of a student killed Friday in
a third straight night of violent
protests over wage and price
freeze policies.
, The seven-hour wave of vio-
lence in which economics student
Hugo de los Santos, 18, was fat-
ally shot, was described as one
of the worst in the capital in the
past three months of disturb-
ances.
It' was feared his funeral could
trigger further outbursts.
Although there was no accurate
casualty toll available, six other
persons were deported seriously1

injured Friday night and ?scores
suffered lesser injuries. About 501
persons were arrested.
Atthe height of the fighting,
students hurled stones from be-
hind barricades as police battled
with tear gas and rifles.
JODRELL BANK, England, -
Observatory reported yesterday
night indications that the Soviet'
spaceship Zond 5 has re-entered
the earth's atmosphere after cir-
cling the moon.
British experts have predicted a
Soviet attempt to land the cap-
sule, adding success would give
,the Rusisans a big step forward
in the man-to-the-moon race.
Sir Bernard Lovell, director of
the observatory here; said his rad-
iotelescopes were receiving no
signals after picking\ up "heaps of
extremely strong signals" earlier
in the day. "If the Russian space-
craft is still in orbit we vwould
have expected to have received
further signals by this time," Lov-
ell said at 7 p.m.

featuring
6 GRAT PLAYS
and
a PREMIERE PRODUCTION
BOX OFFICE OPENS SEPT. 23-12:30-5:00f
Euripides' 0
THE BACCHAE
October 2-5 Trueblood Theatre
Harold Pinter's
THE HOMECOMING
October 30-November 2 Trueblood Theatre
William Shakespeare's
THE TEMPEST
November 20-23 Trueblood Theatre
In cooperation with the Department of English
BANG' BANG! YOU'RE DEAD!
A Premiere Production by Mack Owen
January 29-February 1 Trueblood Theatre
John Osborne's
THE ENTERTAINER
February 19-22 Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

ON,
CONTEMPORARY
THEOLOGY
The seminar will explore the issues in Christian
theology in the 1960's. Possible areas of study
would include religionless Christianity, radical theo-
logy, linguistics, analysis, ethics, and contemporary
expresson of belief.
Decisions about the structure and direction of the
seminar will be made at the organizing meeting.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE WELCOME
ORGANIZING MEETING:
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 8:00 P.M.
GUILD HOUSE, 802 MONROE (2nd floor lounge)
RESOURCE PERSON: THE REV. DONALD TIPTON

-TONIGHT-
THE CHARGING RHINOCEROUS
OF SOUL,
at
$1.00 at the door ! !FREE HOOT Wednesday

PRESENTS
HAMLET
(Russian version; English subtitles)
Directed by A. KOZINTSEV, 1963
Translation by BORIS PASTERNAK
Music score by SHOSTAKOVICH
One of Mr I6Koints'ev' chief nhiects is to make our flesh creep,

PRIOR TO BROADWAY!

SEPTEMBER 17-29

MVOLIERE'S
0.
*ijy
7 4.te

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