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September 21, 1968 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-21

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Saturday; September 21, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Saturday1 September 21, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

Wolverines

to

clash

with

Golden

Bears
The Lineups

In

opener

By DOUG HELLER
Associate sports Editor
Everybody knows that Michigan
always wins its first game of the
year. There's noareason. It just
Now that everyone has a false
sense of security, we can attempt
Frank Appraisal
Clark "Red" Shelton, owner
of REd's restaurant, reported
to Mayor Wendell Hulcher last
night that the hot dogs to be
sold at today's football game
are spoiled. Mayor Hulcher,
City Council Health Officer,
Joseph Price and the Univer-
sity Health Officer, William
Joy went to the stadium to
investigate the report.
Joy tested the hot dogs and
declared them rotten. They
have been confiscated by the
University. Although some
were kept in refrigeration and
are to be sold, hot dogs will be
scarce at today's game.
to be more rational. The fact is,
Michigan is in real trouble today
when it meets the intellectual Gol-
den Bears of riotous Berkeley at
i 1:30 p.m. in the stadium. .
Wolverine Coach Bump F

calls California "one of the tough-
est teams we've played at the start
of a season." Admittedly, this
doesn't mean too much since
Michigan has often started the
season with a patsy, a consequence
of making schedules five years in
advance.
And Cal would usually figure to
fit in the patsy tradition. Except
that they are given a chance of
finishing ahead of UCLA in the
Pacific Eight this year. Except
that USC- and Oregon State are
the only teams expected to have
little trouble with them.
The Golden Bears have a junior
quarterback named Randy Hum-
phries who was good enough to
beat out last year's starter 'Barry
Bronk mid-way in the season.
Bronik has since quit the.,team.
It was Humphries,uincidentally,
who came in late in the game to
throw the 77-yard touchdown pass
that beat Michigan a year ago.
Altogether on offense, Califor-
nia will start eight lettermen who
are coming off a year when they
slept the first seven games and
woke up for the last three, after
Humphries took over.
Unfortunately for Michigan,
Cals defense is better than the
offense. All that time last season'
when the offense was running
three plays and punting, the de-
Tense was gaining loads of valu-

Offense

Defense

(90)
(77)
(55)
(51)
(65)
(78)
(85)
(13)
(40)
(21)
(33)

CALIFORNIA
Wayne Stewart (200) SE
Mike Meerg (230) LT
Gerry Borgia (200) LG
-Bill Laveroni (225) C
Jerome Champion (220) RG
Bob Richards (250) RT
George Harris (220) RE
Randy Humphries (200) QB
Gary Fowler (190) TB
Paul Williams (180) WB
John McGaffie (210) FB

(88)
(76)
(60)
(52)
(61)
(72)
(86)
(22)
(18)
(40)
(48)

MICHIGAN
Jim Mandich (215)
Bob Penksa (225)
Bob Baumgartner (215
Dave Denzin (220)
Stan Broadnax (226);
Dan Dierdorf (255)
Jerry Imsland (210)
Dennis Brown (175)
John Gabler (208)
Ron Johnson (196)
Garvie Craw (211)

TE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
SE
QB
FL
TB
FB

(88)
(67)
(70)
(73)
(81)
(89)
(56)
(58)
(44)
(42)
(18)

CALIFORNIA
Irby Augustine (205) LE
Mark Hultgren (225) LT
Ed White (250) LG
Steve Schulz (220) RG
Dave Seppi (210) RT
Mike McCaffrey (215) RE
Dennis Pitta (215) LB
Travis Tatum (205) LB
Johnnie Williams (195) HB
Eric Kastner (180) HB
Ken Wiedemann (180) S

(91)
(65)
190)
(94)
(97)
(74)
(84)
(24)
(25)
(38)
(12)

MICHIGAN
Phil Seymour (193)
Tom Goss (225)
Tom Stincic (217)
Jerry Miklos (227)
Ed Moore (200)
Dan Parks (235)
Jon Kramer (215)
Brian Healy (170)
Tom Curtis (184)
Bob Wedge (193)
George Hoey (169)

LE
LT
LLB
MG
RLB
RT
RE
LCB
LS
RS
RCB

RON JOHNSON

DENNIS BROWN

able experience. And this year,.
nine of 11 starters are returning
lettermen. This includes Ed
White.
White, playing defensive left
guard is considered the Bears'
best player. Coach Ray Willsey
calls him the best athlete he has
had since Craig Morton, currently
a quarterback with the Dallas
Cowboys. I
But the best part of Cal's team
is the kicking game. Punter Gary

Fowler averaged well over 40 yards
a' kick last year, and has been
doing far better so far this sea-
son.
Place-kicker Ron Miller did not
miss an extra point in 1967, hit
on a 44-yard field goal against
Michigan, a 49-yard three-pointer
against USC, and has connected
on four of his last five attempts.
Thus the Golden Bear strong
point is also Michigan's well-
known Achilles heel. Elliott has,

been considering replacing last
year's punter, Pete Drehmann, who
shas been slow getting started this
season ,with Mark Werner. The
coach said he won't make a deci-
sion until pre-game practice to-
day.
Meanwhile, sophomore place-
kicker Tim' Killian, while upgrad-
ing this area from the non-entity
it was last season, has not yet
shown overwhelming consistency.
Overall, the Wolverines are
walking on eggs this year in terms
of depth. Elliott says he won't
really be sure of what he has be-
hind his first string until he has
to go to his bench during a game.
Meanwhile, the proven credentials

of just about everybody behind
the 22 starters point out that one
injury, would be a severe problem,
and two injuries would be a major
disaster.
The depth problem sabotages
any chance of analyzing the Wol-
verines by merely looking at the
starters. For instance, offensive
line Coach Frank Maloney con-
siders the Michigan attack to be
"very good. But I wouldn't ex-
actly say excellent."
Maloney makes it clear, how-'
ever, that he is only referring to

a completely healthy Wolverine,
offense who's stars, Ron Johnson
and Dennis Brown et al are in ab-
solutely perfect condition.
For Michigan's defense, the
question of injury is more than
merely potential. Already this
year, linebacker Cecil Pryor has
been incapacitated to the extent
that sophomore Ed Moore has
been installed as the new line-
backer while Pryor has been try-
ing to get back into shape. Moore
was originally a defensive end.
In addition, starting cornerback
Jerry Hartman has been tentative-
ly replaced by former linebacker
Bob Wedge while Hartman has
been fighting an injury. Any final
IM FOOTBALL
BULLETIN
Fraternity "B" games for
Sunday, Sept. 22 are+
postponed to Sun., Oct.
1 3. Remainder of games

(f

I

Big Ten Standings

I

decision on who will play- will be
made just before the game.
From all this, one might gather
that the football game is more or
less a toss*-up. Since the fan
doesn't know what to expect, he
would be advised to:
a) Bring cotton to put in his
ears at half-time. This is the 20th
annual band day, It looks great,
but sounds -awful.
b) Admire how equal two foot-
ball teams can be from such dis-
tinguished academic institutions.
c) Avoid eating any food pur-
chased at the game.
ALPHA PHI
OPEN HOUSE
at
1830 Hill Street
Saturday, Sept. 21
from 4 to 6
featyring
BOTTLECOMPANY"

Big1

OUTLOOK DISMAL
en pins hopes on Boilermakers

Final 1967
WL
Indiana 9 2
Minnesota 8 2
Purdue 8 2
Ohio State 6 3
MICHIGAN 4 6
Illinois 4 6
Michigan State -3 7
Northwestern 3 7
Iowa 1 8
Wisconsin 0 9

T
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
1'
Y

Pct.
.818
.800
.800
.667
.400
.400
.300
.300
.150
.050

By ELLIOTT BERRY
This fall, as in every autumn
since Knute Rockne introduced
the foreward pass, the first three
weeks of September have pro-
duced what seems to amount to
volumes of that annual nonsense
called "pre-season polls."
What it all boils down to is that
>day, the first day of action for
.'ost of the nations major col-
leges, a host of upsets will render
hundreds of "knowledgeable fore-
casts" useless garbage. Each suc-
cessive - Saturday will then add a
steady diet of humble pie for the
nation's pigskin prognosticators.
Fortunately each week of play
sheds a little more light on the
subject of what schools shall
You can't play
'f.ixie in Dixie
TI'USVIILE, Fla. ()-Rioting
and fighting between Negro and
ik white youths erupted at high
school football gamesdin Orlando
and Titusville last' night. At least
13 persons were injured, including
three policemen-one of whom
was stabbed.
Trouble at the Titusville High
School-Sanford Seminole game
} began after the Seminole band
struck up "Dixie," the school's
theme' song.
Spectators said Negro youths
rushed the bandsmen and began
beating, them., In 'ethe ensuing
fightin seven persons were in-
jured, including three officers.
Ten persons, five white and five
black, were arrested. Both schools
are' integrated.
At the Tangerine Bowl in Or-
lando, four persons were hospital-
ized in scattered skirmishing after
Orlando Edgewater, predominant-
ly white, defeated Irlando, Jones,
predominantly Negro, 38-18.
Police said trouble broke out at
the Tangerine Bowl after motor-
its leaving the area were stoned
and Negroes and whites exchanged
curses and insults.
The entire 30-member police
force was on hand at Titusville
after officers received a tip of im-
pending trouble. 'At the height of
the melee officers estimated more
than 100 persons were fighting,
pushing and cursing each other.

daIly
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
ROBIN WRIGHT
emerge as the nations great pow-
erhouses by the last week in No-
vember when it counts.
Meanwhile, the Big Ten, which
is reputed to be on the verge of
recpturing most of its trampled-
over prestige, will open its sched-
ule today, and unfortunately all
forecasts can be based on little
more thant pre-season polls and a
little intuition.
Results of these polls show
that, the same pollsters who have
predicted a generally rejuvinated
Big Ten,' have issued individual
team forecasts which show that
the Big Ten will do no better than
3-5 in today's action against its
non-conference opponents. A
game by game look of today's Big
Ten action can only verify this
unhappy forecast.
Virginia's game at Purdue has
to be the surest victory of the
day for the Big Ten. Only Ohio
State who doesn't play, should
have an easier time this after-
noon.
Behind Mr.' Everything Leroy
Keyes, the Boilermakers field a
supporting cast which includes
quarterback sensation Mike
Phipps, fullback Perry Williams,
and a ;brusing defense' which is
no less formidable than the much.
publicized offense.
Virginia pins its minute hopes

If there is another scene of de-
light for the Big Ten today, it will
probably be at Bloomington, In-
diana, home of Cinderella one
year later.
With most of the whiz kids re-
turning to Indiana, the nation's
number 15 ranked team should
have a relatively easy time with
Baylor,\ one of the Southwestern
Conference's lesser e n d o w e d
teams.
But those scrambling clowns be-
hind quarterback Harry Gonso,
halfback John Isenberger and
flanker Jade Butcher, managed
to make every win a difficult one
last year, and there is little reason
to expect things 'will be much dif-
ferent this season.
Upon crossing the Indiana state
line, leaving the Boilermakers and
Hoosiers at home. Big Ten for-
tunes should take a distastrous
turnabout.
Next door in Illinois, the Illini
face a frustrating afternoon
against Kansas, the Big Eight's
second ranked team. Quarterback
Bob Douglass who topped the Big
Eight in total offense last year,
leads the Jawhawks against one
of the Big Ten's mediocre elevens,
Quarterback Bob Naponic and
fullback Rich Johnson provided a'
strong one-two punch in the Il-
lini backfield, but behind them
there is little to challenge the
well-balanced Kansas squad.
Up north, Duffy's Spartans
should have more than they could
handle when they meet a spirited
Syracuse team. Spartan optimists
keep pointing to the fact that
under Duffy the Spartans have
always bounced back from a
losing season to challenge for the
title. But tradition aside, the
Spartans have little going for
them.

.It should be a long day and a
lon'g season for the Colassus at the
Red Cedar River.
The best game on today's Big
Ten schedule should be at Min-
nesota, where- the Gophers take
on O. J. Simpson and the number-
two ranked Trojans. With few
people expecting an upset, the
16th rated Gophers have relatively'
little to lose and much to gain in
this grueling opening assignment.
While the defense, anchored by
All-American end Bob Stein,
should be the Gophers' forte, it is
doubtful that they can stop USC.
Although Simpson dominates the
attack, quarterback Steve Sogge
and flanker Jim Lawrence add
necessary balance.
Opening days are always heavy
with upsetsand there could be
one of the biggest at Minnesota,
but don't count on it.
If the three contests immediate-
ly mentioned look bleak for the
Big Ten, the two appear hope-
less.
Downtrodden Iowa entertains
eighth-ranked Oregon State, while
last year's cellar dwellers tangles
with Arizona.State, slight favor-
ites to take the WAC title. A vic-
tory for either of the conference's
weak sisters would have to be re-
garded as a stunning upset.
The "rejuvenated" Big Ten
looks headed for a disastrous
start.
If only Michigan could get by
California . . . .

to be played as
uled.

sched-

TODAY'S GAMES
California at MICHIGAN,
Kansas at Illinois
Baylor at Indiana
Oregon State at Iowa
Syracuse at Michigan State
Southern Cal at Minnesota
Virginia at Purdue
Wisconsin at Purdue
Wisconsin at Arizona State
(night)
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Miami, Fla., 28, Northwestern 7
I
The ,Michigan Rugby Foot-
ball Club will play their first
three games of the season to
day. Two teams will face To-
ronto University at Toronto
and the third team will play
London University on Wines
Field directly after the football
game.
* * *
The Michigan athletic depart-
ment announced that special
$2.00 high school student tickets
for today's Michigan-California
football game will go on sale at
noon.

Ii'

UNION-LEAGUE

CAMPUS FORUM
presents

ERNEST, MANDEL
Edit or of Belgium Socialist aper
"La Gauche"
on
Marxist View of Alienation
UGLI Multipurpose Room
SUNDAY-8:00 P.M.

AL BRENNER

enough to compensate for the
Spartans lethargic offense.
With halfback Lamarr Thomas
lost for the season, the Spartans
find themselves without a break-
away threat for the first time in
years, and quarterback Bill Ferac-
co has failed to excite anybody.
Captain end Al Brenner, the
Spartans' most exciting ballplay-
er, should have few good passes
coming his way, and he just might
be seen in the Spartans' defensive
secondary this afternoon.

Irt

WE

lEED

for a
averag
halfba
Ander
possib
Boiler
pletely
encour
week.
As R
get ' "z
an ups
like d
Purdue
Ten pi

-I

Downtown I
W"We
uuu Sales & Se rvice, Inc. Accessot
s1 a Es
310 East 665"8637 Parts
Washington u
*Service entrance on 5th Ave.

n upset on a better thana A
;e ground attack paced by Somehow the rumor has gotten
cks Frank Quayle and Jeff around that Michigan State's
son, and more likely on the mediocre defense of last year has
ility that the top ranked suddenly developed into a crack
makers are looking com- unit. Even if this is true, it is
past today's contest to their doubtful that it will be good
nter with Notre Dame next
ong as the Bolermakers can
nspired" enough to suit up Motors
set is indeed unlikely. Today Cam pus rvc
many Saturday's to come, Sales and Service
e many be sole source of Big
?ride.
SPECIAL CLOSE OUT
ond- - '68 American .. $1858
68 Javelins ... $2595
Have Them All -INC. AUTO. TRANS.--
ig and Small, I 69's ARE HERE!
2448 Washtenaw Ave. j
e Phone: 434-2424
4i th Ave. Mon.Thurs., Friday
9-9
Main St

I

TV RENTALS
$10 FREE service(
per month and delivery
NEJAC TV RENTALS 662-5671
SERVING BIG 10 SCHOOLS SINCE 1961

I

YU:R HELP
Students for McCarthy is establishing a continuing
organization (under a suitable name) to act in com-
munity and political affairs. There are four programs
at the moment.
(1 McCARTHY WHRITE=IN CAMPAI GN
We need help in door to door canvass and distribution
of the write-in stickers and instructions. People to
people contact is the best way to change the political
system. Volunteer by calling 662-4131.
We are striving to establish local groups throughout
Michigan If you know people outside the Ann Arbor
area who would like to work for McCarthy or related
projects, call in their names and addresses to Ellen
Rothman, 761-8419.
(2) LOCAL CANDIDATES-CITY ELECTIONS
COMMITTEE
Ed Pierce, Chairman. Walter White, Secretary.
663-3953
We will be working for good candidates for county
offices in the November election. The main function
of this committee is to find good nominees for city
councillors and mayor. We will work to elect them in
April. Can you help with this, committee?
(3) POLICE-CRIME COMMITTEE
John Magney, Chairman. Sue Kesselbart, Secretary.
761-15711
The crime problem in this country has become so ser-
ious that we can be sure the public will fully support
their local police. Yet, as we all know, in many com-
munities the police threaten the rights and well-being
of minority groups. We are seeking proposals which
could reverse both these situations. We will try to
implement sound proposals in the local, community
through political action.
(4) COFFEE HOUSE COMMITTEE .

ALL THOSE
OPPOSED
to the
EEK SYST
General Meeting

'

GR

EM

TAKE A BREAK THIS SUNDAY
Enjoy a delicious charcoal broiled
CHICKEN DINNER
at the St. Francis Men's Club
CHICKEN BARBECUE

I

1

:00 P.M. Sunday, Sept.
1910 Hill St.

22, 1968
I 1 O

{

I

I

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