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September 21, 1968 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-21

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, September 21, 1968

Page $ix THE MiCHIGAN DAILY

DAILY OFFICIAL':,1'<'": BULLET. ." .dIN:..«.tex"^S":Ana". y
:.1.Y:..::l:::{ ':':...:::.:.: ...::1.": :::"::':: ::: .' :.:5 :Mh :."A . r "~ r .

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
off icial publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which, The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ilw responsibility. Notices should. be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to'
Room 3528 L.S.&A. Bldg. before 2
p.m of the day precedingpubli-
cation and by 2 pm. Friday' for
Saturday and Sunday. General No-
taces may be published a maxipm
of two times oni request; Day Cal-
endar items app9ear only once, Stu-
dent organization notices are n o t
accepted for publication. For more
Information call 764-9270.
S ATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
Day Calehdar
Football: U-M vs. California: Mich-'
igan Stadium. 1:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild: A. Koznitsev's Hamlet
(RLsgian version using Pasternak's
prose translation): Architecture Audi-
torui,' 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program: Mo-
liere's The Misanthrope: Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater, 8:00 p.m.
"NIXON I$ A LOSER" or
"HUMPHREY"
BUMPER STICKERS
We're neutral. Pick the
ian not of your choice.,
2 for $1, 5 for.$2, 15 for $5
Mix or Match
LOSERS POLL, BOX 8?6
DENVER, COLORADO

General Notices
Mkae-up final examinations for Ger-
man 101, 102, 111, 232, 236 will be
given Tuesday, September 24, 7-9 p.m.
Students must get written permission
from their former teacher, and register
in the German Department office be-
f or 12 noon, Tuesday, September 24.
Examination rooms will be posted on
the GERMAN. DEPARTMENT bulletin
board.
Broadcasting Service: Radio Station
WUOM-FM (91.7 Mc.) 11 a.m. to 11
p.m. daily. Saturday, 1:15 p.m. Football
-- U-M vs* California, with Tom Hem-
ingway giving the play-by-play report
from Michiganstadium. 5:15 p.m. Jazz
'Revisited," Hazen Schumacher presents
Traditional Songs: jazz interpretations.
Sunday, 1:30 p.m. Martin Luther King
- "Non Violence and Social Change",
a repeat broadcast of the CBC Massey
lectures recorded by Dr. King before1
his death. 4:00 p.m. Library of Congress1
Lectures - Alexander Scourby gives
a dramatic reading on Walt Whitman.
Doctoral
Examinations
Sheila Anne Gallivan Hedegard, Psy-
chology, Dissertation: "A Molecular'
Analysis of Psychological Defense Me-
chanisms," on Saturday, Sept. 21 at
9:15 a.m. in Psychological Clinic, 1027
East Huron, Chairman: G. S. Blum.
Stewart Ashley Kingsbury, Linguis-
tics, Dissertation: "The Syntax of Two
GENERAL
MEETINGI
Open to Allt
TUES., SEPT.24
8 P.M.
VOICE
SDS
MICHIGAN UNION '
RM. 3-KLM
IMPORTANT!
Literature, information Table
I,.

Early Church Slavic Hagiographies, the
Life of St Constantine-Cyril (ZK) and
the Life of St. Methodius (ZN)," on
Saturday, Sept. 21 at 10 a.m. in Room
216 Gunn Bldg., Chairman: J.. C. Cat-
ford.
.Placement
3200 S.A.B.
GENERAL DIVISION
Current Position Openings received
by General Division by mail and phone,
please call 764-7460 for further informa-
tion:
Michigan Chemical Corporation, St.
Louis, Mich. - Salesman, trainee, man,
degree in chem. helpful, not necess,
pref. some sales' exper.F
American Genera Life Insurance,
East Lansing, Mich.'- 4 openings for
insurance agent to sell college plan to
seniors and grad students. -Could still
be going to school, man or woman,'
pref senior or graduate, sales exper
pref.
National Safety Council, Chicago, Ill.

- Two statistical personnel, one with
admin. duties. Pref. BA in bus ad area
with major in math or stat.
Utah State: Caseaile for Board of
Alcoholism, degree in psych., soc. or
G&C areas.
State of Washington: Youti advisor,
BA and some training in youth work.
Detroit Public Schools: Piano Ac-
companist for Jr. and Sr. high music
dept. Two positions open, ability to
harmonize,, transpose, and improvise
necess.
Hartford Board of Education, Conn.:
Manager of Food Services, BA in mgmt.
of food serv. or related areas. Supv.
of 85 employees.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT SERVICE'
128 H, West Enlgrg. Bldg.
Engineering Placement Meeting: No.
3. "Employment Interviewing and Plant
Visits." What to expect and how to
act during employment negotiations.
Third of four meetings. Professor J.
G. Young. September 23, 4:00 p.m. and
7:30 p.m. in Room 311, West Engineer-
ing Building. (Afternoon and evening
meetings will be the same.)

'Advisory commission recommends
overhaul of federal grant system
By STERLING F. GREEN average More one than one-,third American federal system," the both a Strog sales tax and a
Associated Press Staff Writer higher than suburban taxes," the commission declared. strong income tax." the commi-
WASHINGTON - Federal rev- commission found. It proposes a reform system sion said.
. enue sharing with cities ands a Yet, it said, the central cities of "categorical" grants-in-aid "to Numerous other proposals were
major overhaul of the federal cannot keep up with the cost of stimulate and support programs made, aimed at strengthening
grant system were urged Sept. 18 educating underprivileged chil- in specific areas of national in- state and local government by
to help solve the urban dilemma dren. terest" such as air and water such actions as removing restric-
of mushrooming needs and shrink- SCHOOL COSTS pollution abatement. tions on the authority of gover-

ti
'
I

ORGANIZATION NOTICES:
W '6 %nF lf.W W ,l,'.. .. A ''n v-

Hillel Foundation, Sunday, Sept. 22,
Rosh Itashana. Combined conservative-
Reform Services at Rackham Audit.,
7:30 p.m. Hillel members admitted at
7:00 p.m., non-members at 7:30 p.m.;
Monday, Sept. 23, Conservative services
at Raekham Audit. 8:30 a.m. Reform
services at°Rackham Amphitheater, 9:45
a.m.
AFS (American Field Service) will
hold a general meeting, Sunday, Sept.
22nd at 7:00 p.m. in Room 3C of the
Michigan Union, Anyone is eligible to'
attend - Returnees, Finalist , former
high school club members and anyone
else wth interests in the people of the
world. Interested people are urged toi
attend this first meeting of the year.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw: Sunday Services on Sept.,.
22, at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m., Rev. Alfred

Scheips, Pastor: Sermon: "Shouldering
Your Pack" (communion at 9:30 a.m.)
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student Or-
ganization: Supper - Program at 1511
Washtenaw, Sept. 22nd at 6:00 p.m.,
Pre supper orientation for students in-
terested in becoming Gamma Delta
members at 5:15. Speaker: Sandra
Wardwell on her summer work in the
Yukon Territory.
* * *
On September 21st the sororities and
fraternities at the UM in conjunction
with the Athletic Dept. are sponsoring
a "Family Day". The day will begin
with the mighty Wolverines meeting
California on the gridiron. The day's
events will be topped off by a fine
concert at the All Events Building.
Halftime at the football gamewill,be
150 high school marching bands (Bland
Day) and the evening concert will be
the incomparable "Bob Hope Show".

ing resources. Y
The congressionally created Ad-
visory Commission on Inter-
governmental Relations said in a
two-volume report that reforms
are essential to avoid "serious dis-'
ruption of the American federal
system."
The plight of urban centers be-
set by poverty, unrest and social
change is aggravated by financial
distress caused by a static or de-
clining tax base, the bipartisan
commission said.
NOTE FUND INCREASE
It described the federal aid sys-
tem as "grant piled upon grant
from an annual total of $3 billion
in 1956 to . . . about $20 billion
now."
The report also calls for "gen-
eral support payments" from the
U.S. treasury..
This plan, the commission said,
would consist of "revenue sharing
on a per capita basis . . . to allow
states and localities to devise their
own programs and set their own
priorities to help solve their own
unique and most crucial prob-
lems."
HIGH COST CITIZENS
The commission included find-
ings from financial surveys of 37
metropolitan areas. These, it said,
showed that cities are becoming
overburdened with "high cost cit-
izens"-chiefly welfarecases-as
compared with the suburbs, and
carrying a disproportionately
heavy tax load.
"Central city local taxes, meas-
ured against personal income,

The suburbs pay $135 more per
child than the cities for schooling1
across the nation, the report
showed, while the central cities
are spending $100 more per capita
for police, fire, sanitation and
other nonschool purposes than the
suburbs.
Both the Democratic and Re=
publican vice presidential nom-
inees, Sen. Edmund S. Muskie of
Maine and Gov. Spiro T. Agnew
of Maryland, are among the 25
public officials, legislators and
p'rivate citizens vho makeup thel
commission. As a newcomer to the
body, Agnew did not participate
in drafting the recommendations.
FEDERAL INCONSISTENCIES
The study calls for a consoli-
dation of the more than 400 sep-
arately authorized types of fed-
eral grant which, the commission
said, exhibit "tremendous variety
and inconsistency" in the alloca-
tion of funds and the formulas for
matching state contributions.
The report envisages growth of
the federal grant-in-aid system
and does not oppose it as many
foes of "big government" do, but
prescribes a less complex system,
iind one having fewer federal
strings on use of the funds.
GRANT-IN-AID PROPOSAL
"If the states lose control over.
the metropolitan problem they
lose the major responsibility for
domestic government in the Unit-
ed States and in turn surrender
any really significant role in the I

There should also be "block
grants," created by consolidating
existing categories of aid, to give
states and localities greater flex-
ibility in meeting their needs in
such broad fields as health, educa-
tion and welfare, the commission
said.
ADVOCATES NEW.
It called on the states to tap
more fully their own tax resources.
The studies indicated that an ad-
ditional $21.4 billion coul9 be
gleaned from state and local
sources.
"Every state is going to need

nors, reducing the large number
of elected officials, and creating V
"subunits" of city government to
improve contact between the cit-
izens and city hall.
METROPOLITAN STUDIES
The second volume of the re-
port includes detailed studies of
financial problems 'of 12 metro- *
poltan areas - Atlanta, Boston,
Buffalo, Chicago, Cleveland, Hous-
ton, Jersey City, the Los Angeles
Long Beach area, Louisville, Mil-
waukee, San Francisco-Oakland,
and the Paterson-Clifton-Passaic .
area of New Jersey.

Funding rate sowed
for research grants

(Continued from page one)
ed on by late August, Norman
says "at least 70" are likely to
be acted on.
Prof. Robert Taylor of the
chemistry department, is un-
happy with NSF prospects.
"There still will be funds avail-
ale next year for NSF pro-
jects but new grants will not be
as plentiful." he said.
Taylor, Who is doing basic in-
organic and physical chemistry
research through a NSF grant
says, "Initial negotiations over
the requested amounts will pro-

Daily Classifieds Get Results
Phone 764-0558

bably result iq decreased allo-
cations,"
Most of the cuts in spending
will be in equipment, he says.
Our traineeship, program for
graduate students will not be ef-
fected," Norman' says. Salaries
of trainee's are yguaranteed.
The traineeship program,
funded by NSF, amounts to $1.1
million.
Many researchers wererreluc-
tant to talk about their pro,-
jects in relation to the slow
down in funding and were un-
certain as to how they would be
effected.
'fProf..Lawrence Jones of the
physics department said his
$189,000 NSF project for study-
ing cosmic rays is being review-
ed to determine a way to re-
duce the level of expenditures
by the expected 25 per cent.
He explains with a catch in
his voice, "I am trying to re-t
duce the rate of expenditure so
that it will stretch over a long-
er period of time. I am trying to
do this so it will not hamper the
effectiveness of our research."
"So far I can only see reduc-
tions of less than the requested
25%," he says.

Y i

.. . .

Petitioning
Joint Judiciary Council
Pick up Petitions
outside SGC office
1st floor SAB
by
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 25, 1968

Open: 11 A.M.-2 A.M.
Above Ad Worth 25c toward Dinner (One per Customer)

WORSHIP

A

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST
Southern Baptist-Convention
1131 Church St.
761 0441

CHURCH

Rev. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School
11":00 a.m.-Morning Worship
6:30 p.m.-Training Union'
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Terry N. Smith, Minister
Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
Worship Service at 10:00 a.m. - Sermon:
"Present Tense Living."
Church School through Sixth Grade
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 11:00 a.m.-Services.
Sunday at 6:00 p~m.-Gamma Delta, Supper-
Program. Initiation of new members.
Monday at 7:30 p.m.-Pastor's Membership
Class.
Tuesday at 6:00 p.m.-Married Couples Sup-
per.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Mid-week Service,
with Communion.
Thursday at 7:30 p.m.-Old Testament Course,
Friday at 6:30 p.m.-Choir Practice.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Pastors: H. G. Kroehler, A. C. Bizer,
W. C. Wright
9:30 a.m.-Worship Service
9:30 a.m.-Church School

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Phone 662-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, John R.
Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church
Guest Preacher - Muroo E. McDonald from
Trinity College, Scotland.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General Conf.
761-6749
Rev. Charles Johnson
9:30 a.m.-Coffee.
9:45 a.m.-U Fellowship Bible .Discussion.
11:00 a.m.-"Maturity in Christ a Realistic
Goa."
7:00 p.m. - Youth panel and sermon: "A
Time To Rebel?"
8:30 p.m.-Campus and Careers fellowship
and refreshments,
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Dr. Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Phyllis St. Louis, Minister of Education
10:00 oam.-Sermon: "Students; the Saving
Remnant."
Student Religious Liberals Program at 7:00
p.m.-Ric Masten, "Folk Singer."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services, Sunday School
{2-20 years)
WEDN ES DAY,
8:00 p.m.-Testimony Meeting
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon. 10-9, Tues.-Sat. 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Bible Speaks to You," Radio WAAM
1600, Sunday, 8:00 a.m.
For transportation call 663-7321

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Ministers: Calvin S. Malefyt, Paul Swets
10:30 a.m.-"On Being Genuine," Dr. Calvin
Malefyt.
7:00 p.m -"The Anabaptist Vision," J. C.,
Wenger from Goschen Biblical Seminary."
FIRST UNITED METHODIST.
CHURCH and WESLEY I
FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom,. Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. and 11:15 a.m.-"Declaration of
Independence-1968 Style."
6:00 p.m.-Fellowship Supper.
7:00 p.m.-Fellowship Program: "A Reflec-
tion on Mass Education" with Dean James
Robertson of the Residential College.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
1 2:00 noon-Luncheon and Discussion: "A
Church for the TwentiethCentury."
6:00 p.m.- -Wesley Grads-Dinner and Pro-
gram: "A Look at Contemporary Theology"
with Rev. Ronald Tipton.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Edwin Danielson
SUNDAY
11:00 a.m.-Worship Service.

Ph

dvertising
2uirnallizlng
o tographing
or
arts Writing
NO MATTER WHAT
YOUR THING iS--- i
AS A PLACE FOR YOU!
see Jane or Lucy any afternoon-
NOW or in the Fall.

SP(

H)
Come

ST. AIDEN'S EPISCOPAL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway

CHAPEL

I

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion
9.0n :.H n u rnmmiinnn andc-rm

9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Holy Com-
munion
S11:00 a.m.-Coffee in the lounge
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood

i

;f

Is

I

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