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September 21, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-21

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, September 21, 1968

_aToTEMCIA ~L StraSpebr2,16

The

barricades

at Lincoln

By BILL FREELAND
College Press Service
NEW YORK - Members of
New York 'City's "cultural revo-
lutionaries" carried their battle
against bourgeois culture and
dictatorial standards of taste in
art, music and film to the
opening of the Lincoln Center
Film Festival this week.
About 100 demonstrators fil-
led the Center fountain with
soapsuds, booed Mayor Lind-
say's arrival and staged a short
guerrilla theatre piece in the
Center plaza to challenge the,
"legitimacy of Lincoln Center"
as patron and demagogue of
the arts in America.
The protest was organized by
Newsreel, a group of radical
documentary film - makers
whose specialties are movies
about meetings, protests, and
such Happenings as last spring's
dumping of garbage at Lincoln
Center by East Village hippies.
The first announcement of

the plan to disrupt the Film
Festival came in July amidst
classically revolutionary sur-
roundings - a loft in a run-
down warehouse on the Lower
East Side. The meeting attend-
ed by about 59 was called to
form a coalition of radical
groups to support the action.
The coalition came to hi-
clude, in addition to Newsreel,
segments of the Columbia Lib-
eration School, and a number
of political, theatre, and media
groups. The predicted ground-
swell of interest 'and plethora
of meetings, however, never
really materialized. One reason
for this failure was the diffi-
culty the group had winning
broad-based agreement on the
subtle, often intricate ideolog-
ical foundations of the protest.
The main points underlying
the action were so clear,
though, that even Variety, the
show business weekly, conceded
there was a "well-thought-out,

if often weirdo, reasoning be-
hind it."
Perhaps most significant is
the fact that the event marks
the first clear-cut public con-
nection the American Left has
made between the more corn-
mon themes of racial and eco-
nomic repression and the role
played in all of this by "high
culture,"
Lincoln Center, to the pro-
test organizers, is a, symbolic
representation of that culture
because, to them, its objectives
are aligned with the values of
the' "ruling elite" which has
also created the Pentagon and
the New York Stock Exchange
-and for the same reasons:
"the suppression of the mass-
es."
"Lincoln Center is the cul-
tural manifestation of United
States imperialism," a Newsreel
statement charges. As such it
serves to reinforce and dictate
the "separateness, superiority

and inaccessibility of the upper
classes" and to define culture
for the public by calling itself
"New York City's Cultural Cen-
ter."
The Center's policy sponsor-
ing of free performances for
the "culturally deprived" is
tagged "paternalism" by News-
reel. No one is deprived of cul-
ture, the group says - lower
classes are just taught to de-
spise their own and to aspire
to "elitist values" by such ex-
posure.
In the same way as it func-
tions to divide classes, the
statement continues, the Cen-
ter tends to separate art from
the audience. "The spirit of
Lincoln Center," the protesters
say, "has been to isolate and
deify 'High Culture' . . It
makes it a special event, dis-
tinct from the rest of social
phenomena."
'The alternative to this dich-
otomy, according to f a Libera-

Center
tion School proposal, is the de-
velopment of a dialectic art-
one in which the artist does not
work alone making objects to
be placed on pedestals, but in
which creator and appreciator
are joined in the process, of
building a better society.
Some judged Tuesday's dem-
onstration against the Festival,
which will run through Sep-
tember 24, a failure because so
few, participated and because
no disruptive action was taken
inside the theatre. Many
thought Lincoln Center was a
poor target to make the point,
because (unlike many other fes-
tivals with similar programs) it
did not award prizes and many
of its films were excellent
ones, made by "underground"
film makers around the world.
Robert Kramer of Newsreel,
however, said he thought it
successful because it "at least
raised the question of Lincoln
Center's legitimacy."

ARMY OCCUPATION:
Mexican students battle police

$3 MILLION APPROPRIATION:
Regents approve funds
fdor ast Quad CG plan

a retains MSU
financial positions

MEXICO CITY A"i-About 3,000.;
students, some hurling rocks and
firebombs, battled with 1.000 riot
policemen outside a polytechnic
school yesterday in a new out-
burst of the violence harassing
Mexico City as it prepares for the
opening of the Olympic Games
Oct. 11,
There was some gunfire and po-
lice used tear gas in attemoting
to bring the crowd under control.
One police truck was set on fire,
and several persons were reported
injured.
Hundreds of students were holed
up in buildings of the Zacateco
school in the northern sector of
the city.
The outburst came after gun-
men speeding by in two cars
sprayed the College of Mexico with
machine-gun bullets in the dark-
ness before dawn yesterday.
Officials reported the college, a
small institution in downtown
Mexico City, was unoccupied at
the time and there were no cas-
ualties, but they reported $25,000
worthsof damage to the building's
walls, windows and furniture.
The attack came at 3 a.m., fol-
lowing a night of hit and run
clashes between striking students
of the University of Mexico and
other schools and riot police.
The students were protesting
army occupation of the University
of Mexico, near Olympic Stadium
and Olympic Village.
The university remained under
control of the army. It had been'
occupied by striking students
since late July until the army took
over its suburban campus Wednes-
day night.
Students since July 29 have
been protesting army occupation
of various preparatory schools in
the wake of rioting.
They also are pressing for de-
mands which include firing of
police officials, and disabanding
of the corps of riot police.
The count of those arrested has
risen to 736, among them a num-
ber of university professors.
Interior Minister Luis Ech-
everria said the university campus
would be returned to university
authorities as soon as they asked
for it.

(Continued from page one)
* Legal action was authorized
by the Regents to seek elimina-
tion of a discriminatory clause in
a $1,500,000 bequest to the Univer-
sity.
The money will rot become im-
mediately available to the Uni-
versity, as the bequest provides
first for a life income! to a bene-
ficiary. Upon expiration of this
estate the money is to be used
for scholarships.
The clause the Regents seek to
strike states these scholarships
must be given to "male students
of the Caucasian race."
Legal proc'eedings to remove the
clause will be instituted in the
District of Columbia. The Regents
also requested legal counsel to
study other funds which may con-

tain discriminatory provisions.
Specific mention was made in the
meeting of the Barbour Funds.
0 Vice President for Research

measure. He said many federal
sponsoring agencies, notably the
National Science Foundation, had
leveled off their budgets in an-

A. Geoffrey Norman reported a j ticipation of having to meet partI

"distinct decrease" in the growth
rate of academic research at the
University. He' said total expendi-
tures on research for the year
1967-68 amounted to $62,107,019.
This figure represents a 5 percent
increase over the previous year,
but the increase is substantially
smaller than the average 14 per-
cent growth rate established in re-
cent years.
Norman attributed the decrease
in part to the $6 billion cut in fed-
eral research expenditures at-
tached to the 10 per cent surtax

ashtenaw budget:
Deficit, tax hike

of this cut.
In other action the Regents for-
mally approved the construction
of a cooperative housing facility
on North Campus by the Inter-
Cooperative Council (ICC). ICC
had applied to the Department of
Housing and Urban Development,
College Housing Program for a
$1,240,000 loan to construct the
facility.
The regulations of the College
Housing Program permit loans to
student cooperatives only if the
college or university signs for the
loan, or if the governing boC'y of
the institution formally approves
in states where co-signing is pre-
vented by law. Since Michigan law
does forbid such co-signing, Re-
gental approval of the ICC project
was required.
NATIONAL SENERAL CORPRTO
FOX EASTERN THEATRESin
FOH viLIEE
375No.MAPLE RD.-769-1300
HELD OVER
.Mon.-Fri.-7:00, 9:00
Sat.-Sun.-1 :45, 3:30,
5:15, 7:00, 9.00
2Qth CefnturFoxtpresents
DEBORAH KERR DAVID NIVEN
PevdenctPi
A KAHN-HARPER PRODUCTION -Color by De Luxe
STARTS WEDNESDAY
"PETULIA"

(Continued from page one)
quit his job or drop his immed-
iate family's holdings in the
Philip Jesse Co., which owns the
I.B.M. building.
May then took a sabbatical with
pay for three months. At their
July meeting the trustees voted to
continue May's' leave of absence
without pay until yesterday so he
would have a chance to abandon
his business holdings.
-In his letter to Hannah, May
quoted from Kelley's opinion the
phrase, "It would be unfair to
penalize Mr. May for his p a s t
conduct; nevertheless, I do not be-
lieve the situation involving the
I.B.M. Corporation . . . should1
continue."
May said his wife, formerly a
major stockholder in the Philip
Jesse Co. "has divested ownership
of all stock in the building corpor-
ation and has resigned as an offi-
cer of the corporation."
Responding to a suggestion by
Stevens that he be demoted. to
an inferior position, May said, "I

do not feel that I can accept a
position of lesser responsibility."
Harlan called the board's ac-
tion a "whitewash" of May. "He
used the university and its pres-
tige in a way that smacks of the
worst kind of arogance." Harlan
vowed to continue his fight
against May.
Hannah praised May as having
"superb business judgement . .
he's as competent as any business
officer in any university."
Mays' title has been Vice Pres-
ident in charge of Finance, and
Treasurer for MSU for 21 years.
Hannah credits him with playing
a key role in the university's de-
velopment over the past two de-
cades.
"There was never any sugges-
tion or allegation suspecting h i s
personal character," Hannah add-
ed. -
The trustees' vote caine after
editorials this week in both the
Detroit Free Press and the De-
troit News urging May's dismis-
sal.

,_ ._ __
I

THERE ARE 45 FRATERNITIES

4

ON
THE U OF M CAMPUS

(Continued from page one)
All insurance coverages of the
county employes will be doubled
to $4,000 and broader medical in-
surance will be available.
The WMC cut almost $20,000
from the Social Services budget
and raised the sheriff's budget
almost $200,000.
The social services budget was
cut from $611,840 to $431,280. The
sheriff's budget was raised to
$930,359 - the largest depart-
mental budget.
Only two new items appear on
this year's budget: $230,000 for
new road development and $30,-

000 for the Washtenaw C ou n t y
Citizens Committee for Economic
Opportunity.
Other areas of large allocation
include the Health Department
and the courts.
WMC chairman Fred Lunde
said the budget will be present-
ed the supervisors on the under-
standing that it must cut $1.3.to
$1.5 million from departmental re-
quests to stay within expenditures.
Lunde said the supervisors' de-
cision to drop the project to re-
model the N. Main St. building
for county offices permitted the
general pay raise and improved
fringe benefits.

CINEMAI
"SHOP ON MAIN 'STREET"
DIRECTED BY KADAR,
with IDA KAMINSKA
Made in Czechoslovakia
Received an ACADEMY AWARD as the
BEST FOREIGN FILM
7-9 P.M.
SAT., SEPT. 21 AUD. A 75c ID req.

-Associated Press
Standing on the corner...
Waiting for Francine to go by were 15,000 members of the Wall
Street set. But the executives waited in vain, for busty Francine
Gottfried (43-25-37) to pass on her regular lunchtime rout.
IBM had given their famed machine operator the day off.

3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
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Paramount Pictures Prese
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