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September 20, 1968 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-20

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, September 20, 1968

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-. l " r - -

PHONE 417 E. Liberty
662-0675 Just post
music SHOPS AA Bank
HOME of U. of M. MUSIC
Cone and see... recorded music
is our pleasure, as well as our business.
We have MANY of the LATEST RELEASES,
including:
"In Search of a Lost Chord"
by ,the MOODY BLUES
I n-a-Gadda-da-Vida"
by the IRON BUTTERFLY
"Cheap Thrills" by RIO BROTHER
and the HOLDING COMPANY,
"Shine On Brightly"
by the NEW PROCOL HARUM

Michigan youth boffo at Cards' diamond conclave

By ROBIN WRIGHT
Not many Michigan students
can claim to be called the "good
luck charm" of the St. Louis Car-
dinals.
And participate in pennant vic-
tory celebrations.
And get doused with champagne
while being interviewed on na-
tionwide TV.
Michigan sophomore Ted Sim-
mons can tell you about it first
hand.
Simmons was brought up from
a Cards' farm team just in time
to be nicknamed the team's lucky
charm in the last stretch for the
pennant.
And when the Cardinals won
the National League pennant Sat-
urday, Simmons was brought right
into the center of the festivities.
Placed on a table for a TV inter-
view, he was doused with victory
chmpagne and robbed of his shirt
by celebrating teammates.
A Detroit resident and former
Tiger fan, Simmons was the num-
ber one high school draft choice
of the Cardinals in 1967. Two suc-
cessful summers catching for a
Class A farm team brought Sim-
mons the surprise promotion to
the major leagues.
Simons described the promotion

as "completely unexpected. I;
thought I'd be in the minor
leagues for at least three or fourl
years.
"I couldn't believe it when the
asistant farm director flew out to
check my progress, and ended up
offering me aplace with the Car-
dinals for the remainder of the
season. They even worked it out
so I could stay in school and fly
down for the weekend series.
"At first I. thought they were
just talking big so I wouldn't be
interested in the expansion teams
that'd been around to see me
play, so I didn't say anything to
anyone.j
"But three weeks later it became
a definite thing. After that, all
I could think about was finishing
our season so I'd be moved up. It
seemed like forever until our last,
game."
Simmons credentials justify the
Cards' decision.,
Voted Most Valuable Player in
the California Class A league,
Simmons swept in three league.
championships with a .331 batting
average, 28 homeruns .and 117
RBI's.
The Sept. 6 and 7 series against
the Giants was' the first weekend
Simmons spent in a pro uniform.

most. He forfeited a football and
baseball tender when he signed a
pro contract.
"Football was one of the things
that made the decision to go pro
so tough. It still hurts when I get
into the stadium, I can't help but
think that I could be down there
in the game."
Enrolled in physical education
Simmons plans to switch his ma-
jor to speech. "I'd like to broad-
cast baseball or football after my
pro career is over. I don't want to
leave sports."
Although ineligible for the
World Series, since ..he didn't ap-
pear on the roster before Sept. 1,
Simmons has great faith in "his
team."
"After watching Saturday's
game, I don't know how they could
ever lose. They have great unity
and, spirit. They're all out there
together, no guy is out for his
own record.
"They don't feel they'll walk
away with the Series-'cause the
Tigers will give them a good fight.
But I know we'll win it."

Simmons at Woolworth's between innings

And during the first game, Sim-
mons almost got his break.
, "In the bottom of the ninth we
were losing 5-1. It looked pretty
hopeless. With two outs, Scofield
was up and Spezio was on deck.
The pitcher next. Since they had
exhausted all the pinchhitters, I
was a prospect to hit for the
pitcher. But I couldn't believe
they'd really put me in.
"Then the manager said, ""Hey
Sims, grap a bat."
"Boy, did I get pumped up. It
was a real effort to walk t6 the
batting rack. I kept thinking, if

those two guys get on base, then
I'll be up.
Scofield was looking for a walk
since the call was 3-2, and he{
hadn't swung yet. Then he was
called out on a fast ball, and the
game was over.
"I couldn't believe it was over.
I kept wanting to say, 'Hey wait,
you didn't let me have my turn
at bat.'
"Last week I knew they were
after the pennant and would only

use regulars. But I'm pretty sure
I'll get a chance to play next
weekend in Los Angeles. They may
even let me catch a game."
A typical Michigan quaddie,.
Simmons is a joker, tireless card,
player and a night creature. He
pases extra time playing practical
jokes on friends,/watching football
and talking sports with ,other
quaddies.
During the off-season, Simmons
misses football participation the

4

FROSH PROSPECTS

I

Defensive backs must run like deer

i

6fE

sR

'College Men's
Guide to
Traditional
Clothing,

By KIM JOHNSON
Downfield, where it's one-on-
one, you against him, mistakes
can be costly. You make a wrong
move, a miscalculation, and you've
blown it, baby. And it's often six
points for the bad guys.
This is the world of the de-
fensive back, alone in the open
for the whole world to deride him
for his blunders. And, ironically,
there is only a limited amount of
possible preparation for this most
thankless of all positions. Skill
and confidence come in large part
from experience, from trial under
fire.
This is not to say the poor play-
er is sent in cold to face the
lions. The defensive back under-
goes as extensive practice as any-
one to get him ready for Satur-
day at the stadium. At Michigan,
this training starts with c o a c h
Bill Dodd and the freshman team.
Dodd has between 16 and 22
boys out for the defensive back-
PAUL CAMELET
MASTER TAILOR
for Men and Women
alterations and remodeler
specializes in shortening ladies
coats, slacks, and skirts.
No longer with Camelet Bros.
in business for himself.
1103 S. University
above the drugstore
663-4381

field. However, these are all se-
lected from the group of offensive
backs and are chosen for the qual-
ties essential on defense.
"We don't recruit defensive
backs," states Dodd. "We recruit
offensive backs and turn some of
them, into defensive ones."
The freshman backs go both
ways, offense and defense, and a
depth chart is made on each of
them. During the two inter-col-
legiate games Michigan has sched-
uled this year, each player will
be tried both ways ,and also in
the Monday scrimmages against
the varsity.
Finally, using fhe charts and
films made during the games and

..zz.~vv

Keyes wil
switch with
Kirpatrick
iLAFAYETrt, md. (Al)'

Jim

Why are we traditionalists?

Kirkpatrick and All - American
Leroy Keyes will alternate between
running back and flanker back in
Purdue's football opener tomor-
row against the University of
Virginia*
Kirkpatrick, who played behind
senior halfback Bob Baltzell last
year, was the Big Ten's leading
kick off returner.

the scrimmages, each player will
be evaluated by the varsity coach-
es, both offensively and defensive-
ly.' Their abilities, coupled with
the needs of the varsity, deter-
mine how each man'will be used
on the big team.
Among the cornerbacks which
Dodd picked out for special praise
were pave Zuecarelli, 6'1", 190-lb.
back from Chicago, Preston Henry
from Flint, who stands 5'1" and
weighs 175 pounds, and 6'2", 190-
lb. Glenn Doughty from Detroit.
The ; freshman coach also made
mention >of Mike Oldham from
Cincinnati and Alex Rodgers from
Detroit.
Men who Dodd believes have
the qualities to make fine safeties
include Bruce Elliott, a 6'/", 173-
pound quarterback from Indiana-
polis, and Frank Gusick; 6'1", 185-
pound back from Garfield Heights,
Ohio.
A cornerback has to meet two
criteria, says Dodd. First, he has
to have good speed, since he goes
one-on-one with side receivers.
Second, he has to be a hitter, be-
cause he must come up and 'wipe
out the interference of an enemy
ball carrier so that the safety can
make the tackle.
"It's hard to find this combin-
ation in a boy." declares Dodd. "If
they have the speed, they're often,
not big enough to .take the pound--
ing from the other part of their
job."
"The hardest thing for a de-
fensive back to learn," says Dodd.
"is to read. their keys, to react
to the opposing players' key moves
and be ready"for them." The inex
perienced player tends to watch
the ball instead of the key, he
reasons.
Discovering the'real talent of
his backs will start soon as Dodd
stresses fundamentals in scrim-
mages in preparation for t h e'
games. In losing at least three de-
fensive backs at the end of this
season ,the varsity will need help.
And despite the fact that this is
the toughest position for a sopho-
more to take over, Dodd believes
that his freshmen will be ready.

vim

-4

The natural look feels right and looks right. Nothing
flamboyant, just quietly distinctive. Our 12 Redwood 65
Ross stores give us the unique capabilities for that well
dressed look.'

SUITS
Warm earth tones create a whole new dimension in vested
country glens, window panes and checks. Soft chalk stripes,
herringbones, plain weaves round-out the new traditional
look.

7500 to

10000

SPORT JACKETS
Bold plaids, checks dominate the scene for fall, along with
perennially favored herringbones andthe classic Redwood
& Ross blazer. Outstanding heroic colors including new color
accents of olive, whiskey and blue.
4000 to 6000
TROUSERS
Good looking new plaids and tattersall coordinate perfectly
with solid color jackets and blazers-hopsacks, twists to go
with the patterned sport jackets.
1800 to 2000
DRESS SHIRTS
Take on a new look for fall. Smaller tattersall checks, stripes
of every dimension, colorings that are deeper and darker-
perfectly compliment the lighter tones in clothing. Soft
flaired button down collar . . . in the traditional tailored
look.
600 to 1000

to a career-beginning
ENGINEER!
Find Out About' the Exciting
STARTING POSITIONS
at "THE DISCOVERY COMPANY"
UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION
Interviewing on Campus Friday, September 27, 1968
"Let's talk about your career"
We invite you to join a company that is big enough to give you
everything you desire in your career-in any direction your talent,
and skill may take! Union Carbide has immediate opportunities in
its Materials Systems Division, with! major operations in Indianapolis
and Kokomo and others in principal cities over the nation. Interest-
ing, exciting work, full use for your technical and management
skills. This growing division produces special alloys, refractory
metals and metal aind ceramic coatings. Applications are in space-
age and a broad spectrum of other industries. More plant are on
the drawing board. To you this means WIDE-OPEN-OPPORTUNITY.
You can literally write your own ticket in your career development.
Your contributions will be recognized and rewarded. Complete
research facilities and equipment to aid you. You will work with
technicdl, operating and management people and with customers-
solving problems of materials-in-use and new -materials that are
needed in diversified fields.
B.S. OR M.S. GRADUATE STUDENTS:
* METALLURGICAL Areas in which
*MECHANICALA i
* INDUSTRIAL you can start!
* ELECTRICAL Research & Development
* CHEMICAL Design, Process and
* CERAMIC Product Development
* AND RELATED Manufacturing.
DISCIPLINES Sales Engineering, Etc.
Excellent starting salary; good benefits, including insurance, pension,
savings plan, tuition refund, etc.
Please refer to our brochure located in your Campus Placement
Bureau. We invite you to discuss your future with our Representa_
tive. Call or visit your Placement Bureau now to arrange an appoint-
ment. (764-8483).
Or write at once to Arthur M. Schunk, Dept. CR-1i

*4

4

IM FOOTBALL
BULLETIN
Fraternity "B' games for
Sunday, Sept. 22 are
postponed to Sun., Oct.
13. Remainder of games
to be played as sched-
uled.
Campus Motors
Sales and Service
SPECIAL CLOSE OUT
68 American . . .$1858
68 Javelins .... $2595
-INC. AUTO. TRANS.-
'69's/ARE HERE !
2448 Washtenaw Ave.
Phone: 434-2424
Mon., Thurs., Friday
9-9

I

SWEATERS
Our sweater collection is abundant with new interesting
ideas. Turtle necks, V-necks, crews in a variety of weights
and textures including the popular cables. Illustrated is our
classic lambs wool V-neck by Cox Moore of England-a name
that is symphonious with quality.
1600

Union Carbide Corporation
'' Materials Systems Division
1500 Polco Street

11

Indianapolis, Indiana 46224
An Equal Opportunity Employer

i

U I

SHOES
That important completing accessory. Famous traditional
Bass weejun casuals, Bass dress brogue monograms, both
with the new classic rounded toe.
1900 to 3200

El In

mI1

I

II

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