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September 19, 1968 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-19

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Thursday, September '19, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pa<i Seven

hulrsy, Sepo 1.4+,:! t em er 19198TEMC IA DIb

Pane Seven

,.

1968 Detroit Tigers: Pennants
wnhere pennants are due.

West Coast

By DIANA ROMANCHUK
and HOWARD KOHN
It all started innocently enough. Gates Brown
popped a pinch-hit homer in the bottom of the
ninth to give the Tigers their first win on the
second day of the season.
Detroit people tell each other every spring
that this year the Tigers are going to win. They
have been repeating the ritual for 23 years. Only
the most moronic of them ever believe it.
4 "After all," they say, "Look how close they
came last year." And verily, last year was the
first time the Tigers had even come close enough
to blow a pennant.
Besides, as any good Chinese knows, this is the
Year of the Tiger.
And the Tigers' people invested in them, buy-
ing "Sock It to 'Em, Tigers" and "Denny McLain
for President" stickers from a quick-minded
wizard who lived to tell his tale.
The unbelievable thing, of course, was not that
the Tigers won but the way they won.
The Tigers trail the Orioles 5-3 with two on
and two out in the ninth. Tom Matchik (I mean
really), with two strikes on him drills a home
* run.r
The Tigers lead the Red Sox 8-0. The Red Sox
tie the score 8-8. The Tigers lead the Red Sox
9-8. The Red Sox tie 9-9. The Tigers win 10-9 on
Bill Freehan's 11th-inning homer.

Gates Brown hits a 14th-inning home run in
the first game of a doubleheader, and caps a four-
run ninth-inning rally with an RBI-single in the
second game.
The fans were slowly reconciled to the fact
the Tigers could pull off last-minute, down-to-
the-wire rallies.
Everything the Tiger fans had been silently.
screaming from the stands for years was mate-
rializing . . . a bullpen (though the name of
the savior changed bi-weekly), twp-out RBI
singles instead of strikeouts, and an incredible
number of clutch plays.f
That penny McLain would win 30 games was
as much incidental as it was a product of what the
Tigers were doing.
Willie Horton singled in the ninth for the
deciding run on McLain's 30th,
And Tuesday night, the Tigers won their 37th
game in which they were tied or trailed in the
seventh inning or later. Don Wert's single in the
ninth iced it.
And the hopes and fears of all the years were
loosed in the overflow of the stands and the
raising of the American League pennant atop the
centerfield flagpole.
In the end the Tigers won the pennant not so
much because they scored runs but because there
were runs to be scored.

no-hitter
By The Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO-Ray Wash-
burn, a stocky right-hander, made
baseball history by hurling the
second no-hitter in two days in
San Francisco's Candlestick Park
Wednesday as the St. Louis Car-
dinals whipped the Giants 2-0.
Less than 24 hours earlier, the
Giants' Gaylord Perry had held
the Cards hitless, and it was the
first time one ball park has been
the scene of consecutive no-
hitters.
The 30-year-old Washburn was1
in complete control, striking out
eight and permitting only five
runners, all onwalks.
Hisonly jam came in the sev-
enth, when walks to Ron Hunt
and Willie McCovey and Jim
Hart's ground out put runner. on
second and third with two out.
But Washburn struck out Dick
Dietz to end the threat.
Washburn, 13-7, and the Giants'
Bob Bolin were locked in a score-
less duel until the seventh when
Orlando Cepeda singled, went to
second on a ground out and
ceives con- scored on Mike Shannon's double.
after Wash- The Cards added another run in
he first pair the eighth on Dick Schoefield's
y's master- double, Washburn's sacrifice and
Curt Flood's infield single.
------ - Closing in on his masterpiece,
Washburn swept into the ninth
to face the toughest part of the
Giants' batting order. He got Ron

sports,
NIGHT EDITOR:
ANDY BARBAS
Hunt on a bouncer to second base-
man Phil Gagliano.E
"Washburn's first pitch to Mays
was a ball that got past catcher
John Edwards. T h e n Willie
bounced out to third baseman
Mike Shannon.
He went ahead 0-2 on McCovey,
threw a ball and then got him on
a soft liner to Curt Flood-only
the second ball hit to the outfield.
Perry, who pitched the 1-0 no-

hitter Tuesday night against the
Cards, hurried down to the Red-
bird dressing room to congratulate
Washburn.
"It was rmy first no hitter since
high school," confided the 30-
year-old Washburn who was. just
two years old when a Card pitcher
last turned the trick-Lou War-
neke against the Cincinnati Reds
back in 1940.
"This was probably my, best
game ever," the Kirkland, Wash.,
right-hander said. "I got around
to thinking about a no-hitter in
the sixth. By then, the boys were
saying 'Let's get some more hits'
or 'Let's get some more runs,' But
nobody said anything about a no-
hitter."
The only other time two no-
hitters have been pitched on suc-
cessive days goes back to 1917
when the -St. Louis Browns did it
against the Chicago White Sox-
but it was over a three-game span.

singe

continues

I

CARDINAL PITCHER RAY WASHBURN (l.) re
gratulations from Giant hurler Gaylord Perry (r.) a
burn fired a no-hitter yesterday. The two became th
to hurl consecutive no-hitters at one stadium. Perr
piece conquered the Cards Tuesday.

:. I

Get set... #GO!
The Detroit Tigers announced
yesterday plansfor the sale of
World Series tickets 'for the
games in Detroit.,
Games three, four, and if nec-,
essary five, will be held October.
5-7. Prices are: box seats, $12;
grandstand, $8; and pavilon, $6.
Ticket sales will be mail order,
must include a $1 handling
charge, and are limited to two
per order.
Orders -should be addressed
to: Detroit Tigers, P.O. Box 400,
Detroit, 48232. Only certified or
cashiers checks, or money or-
degs are acceptable. Unless
otherwise stated, lower-priced ,
tickets' will be substituted if
necessary. Selection will be by
drawing. .
At 'Bleacher seats will be sold
for $2 a ticket over the counter
beginning 9 a.m., October 2.

IFC SECEDES
Roarke rips Intramural Advisory Bo

Ord

By JIM FORRESTER
Activity among campus frater-
nities seems to be on the upswing
this year. Bob Hope and IFC Com-
mentary are efforts not usualy at-
tempted by the local Greeks. But
the move to .activate the fraterni-
ties may become most effective in
the area of athletics.
The newly appointed Intramural
Advisory Board, however, could be
a thorn in the side of IFC. The
fraternities have no representa-
tive on the. Board and feel it is
their right and that they are most.
qualified for such representation.
"Much of the IM activity takes

place in fraternities," says I F C
president 'Bob Roarke, "and the
representation should be where
the action is."
Roarke attacks the 2-2 male-fe-
male. split on the Board as over
representing the fairer sex. "The
men make for at least 75 per cent
of the IM activity, if not more,
he declared.
Most of the IFC bitterness emi-
nates from the appointment to the
board of Daily sports staff mem-
ber Robin Wright. A lack of IM
'activity at the Daily and a sup-
posed lack of qualifications in
Miss Wright give rise to most of
this angry feeling.
Roarke went on to say that he
felt the Board would be ineffec-
tive j anyway.1 He cited what he
feels to be a tendency among most
committees "to do more talking
than doing."
When asked about the recent
action of the Board to initiate re-.

pairs on Palmer field and pur-
chase portable sports facilities,,
Roarke said, "The actions of the
Board had been essentially decid-
, ed upon before the Board ever
met. Don Canham set what he felt
was needed to be done in front
of. the Board and they voted it
through."
Roarke's solution is for IFC to
run as much of its- own IM pro-
giam as possible. IFC plans to
hold championships in A and 1
football, tennis and possibly golf
in the fall term. A bridge tour-
nament in conjunction with Pan-
hellenic' is also in the works.
A more promising aspect of the.
fraternity athletic program,
though, is -the organization and
conduct of football and basket-
ball for underprivileged children
of Ann Arbor.
In connection with1Community
Services, each fraternity is to
sponsor, equip and coach a team.
It is hoped that public school fa-

cilities
use.

will be made available for

"We want to give ou men a
chance to see and understand how,
the other half lives," said Roarke.
"We want to give the fraternities
a chance to really help these peo-
ple."
The upswing in activity among
the fraternities leads Roarke to
comment that, "fraternities a r e
coming back strong at Michigan."
The work with local youth seems
to support this statement but the
attack upon the IM Advisory
Board, and the plan to work out-
side of it, may just retard t h e
effort of the fraternities to regain
the respect they had on this
campus so many years ago.

Olympic protest
PHILADELPHIA (RP) - Villan-
ova track coach Jim Elliott said
he is filing a protest with the U.S.
Track and Field Committee over
the exclusion of miler Dave Pat-
rick from the Olympic team.
Patrick finished fourth in the
1,500 meters race at the final
Olympic track trials. Only the
first three finishers were given
Olympic berths.
But, said Elliott, "The men's
track and field committee was ir-
revocably committed to placing on
the team the winner of the Los
Angeles trials by statements made
to the press, athletes and coaches
at that time."
The 22-year-old Patrick won
that race in late June.

a
SPECIAL EETN
featuring
" How To /Make te Most'of
Your Advertising Dollar"
THURSDAY, SEPT. 19th
4:15 P.M.
420 Maynard St.
All Student organization publicity and advertising
chairmen are urged to attend. You are requested
to regjster your organization with us.
For further details call Ken Kraus
at 764-0560

I

1

I

Gridde Pickin gs

Today Gridde Pickings decided to interview Sewanee Coach
Shirley Majors to get the story on their game with Millsaps.
The phone company, however, had different ideas.
To call out of a University phone you must dial 9 and then your
number. This I did five times before local information finally
answered. The other four times an all nasal lady recording answered
telling me I had dialed wrong. Once, well maybe, but four times?
From local nose people I got the area code of Sewanee, Ten-
nessee. (It's 615 in, case you ever want to call there.)
From Sewanee info'rmation I was given the number of University
of the South information, which, when dialed, answered "Police!"
By this time I.didn't care if I ever reached whoever it was I was
calling in the first place.r
But if I had reached this person he most certainly would have
entered Gridde Pickings in order to win a free Cottage Inn pizza with
anything he wanted on it. Even if you aren't whoever I was calling,
you may win this culinary delight if you get your Gridde Pickings
entry to the Daily before 8 P.M. Friday Sept. 20, 1968.

---- --.

i

Major League Statiirrs

;

AMERICAN LEAGUE

xDetrot
Baltimore
Boston
New York
Cleveland
Oakland
Minnesota
California.
Chicago
Washington

98
87
81
84
81
77
73
66
63
59

L
54
67
72
72
73
7s
80
488
90
93

Pct.
.645
.565
.529
.526
.526
.503;
.477!
.429
.412
.388

GB
12
17
18
18
21/
252
33
352
39

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Wv L,%Pct, GB
aSt. Louis 94 59 .614 -
San Francisco 82 71 .536 12
xCincinnati 78 72 .520 14
Atlanta '77 76 .503 17
Chicago 79 75 .513 152
Pittsburgh' 75 77 .493 18V
Philadelphia 72 81 .471 22
xLos Angeles 70 82 .461 232
Houston 68 85 .444 26
New York 68 85 .444 26
a-Clinched Pennant
x--Late game not included.
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louisat San Francisco
Atlanta at Houston, night
Cincinnati at Los Angeles, night
Only games scheduled
1 YESTERDA'Y'S RESULTS
St. Louis 2, San Francisco 0
Chicago 7, New York 2, night'-
Atlanta 2, Houiston 0, night
Philadelphia 2, Pittsburgh 1, night
Cincinnati, Los Angeles, night

Open: 1I A.M.- A.M.
Above Ad Worth 25c toward Dinner (One per Customer)

-

I

11

x-Clinched pennant
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Detroit
Washington at Cleveland
Only games scheduled
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 4, Baltimore 0
Minnesota 4-3, California 3-4
Washington at Cleveland, rain
New York at Detroit, rain
Only games scheduled

1. California at MICHIGAN
(pick score) .
2. Northwestern at Miami, Fla.
(Friday night)
3. Kansas at Illinois
4. Baylor at Indiana
5. Oregon State at Iowa
6. Syracuse at Michigan State
7. Southern Cal at Minnesota
8. Wisconsin at Arizona State
9. Virginia at Purdue

10,
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Oklahoma at Notre Dame.
Duke at South Carolina
Pittsburgh at UCLA
Oklahoma State at Arkansas
SMU at Auburn
TCU-at Georgia Tech
Mississippi at 1Memphis St.
NC State at North Carolina
Navy at Penn State
Houston at Texas
Millsaps at Sewanee r

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