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September 17, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-17

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Tuesday, September 17, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 17, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

0

Chrysler announces
price hike for 1969

Judiciary Committee
votes on Fortas today

DETROIT (I)-Chrysler Corp.,
citing increased labor and mate-
rials costs, yesterday became the
* first U.S. automaker to announce
a price increase in its 1969 models.
The firm said its new prices
averaged $84 a car or 2.9 per cent
over 1968 prices.
Apparently trying to head off
federal or congressional criticism
of his firm's price list, John J.
Riccardo, Chrysler's group., vice
president for U.S. and Canadian
automotive, said "The company's
intensive efforts in cost-reducing'
procedures and improvements in
its operations have enabled it to
absorb some-of the increased costs
of producing our 1969 cars.
"The government's own figures,'
Riccardo added, "from the Bureau
of Labor Statistics for July, 1968,
show that new car prices have
declined by 17.9 per cent in rela-
tion to all items included in the
consumer price index, since the
1957-59 base period."
The prices, as posted by Chrys-
ler, did not include the 7 per cent
federal 'excise tax, dealer charges
for handling and preparing the
DIAL 8-6416
"A SIZZLER
FROM FRANCE-
\
- (-
i S II RADL5'Y *MM"GER I
I.4Jproductioni
WILL BE THE
MOST TALKED-ABOUT
MOVIE AROUND!"
-WINS

new car for delivery to customers,
shipping charges and state and
local taxes.
It marked the third consecutive
year that Chrysler was the first
auto company to get its new line
into the marketplace. In 1966 and
1967, it had to cut back on its
announcement increases after
General Motors-biggest of the
auto firms-came up with smaller
increases than Chrysler did.
General Motors, Ford and
American Motors are due to an-
nounce new car prices before their
1969's go on sale later this month.
Chrysler's new cars go on sale
Thursday.
Chrysler reported that optional
item prices, such as those for pow-
er steering and radios, also had
been upped "generally by the
same percentage" as the increases
for the new cars.
Chrysler. as its top officials in-
dicated several weeks ago, did
not include in its price the new
federally required head rests.
which must be on all news cars
sold after Jan. 1, 1969.
Chryslgr chairman Lynn A.
Townsend had said the item would
remain an option until next Jan.
1 when Chrysler will adjust its
prices to include it.
3020 Washtenaw. Ph. 434-1752
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor
IN COLDYN.
BLOOD
Wrinen for the screen onddirecedby
Richard Brooks,
A Columbia Pictures Release In Ponatisiorf

-Associated Press

Nigerians send wounded to Lagos hospital

Biafra
LAGOS, Nigeria (P)-The Nige-
rian army announced it captured
the Biafran town of Owerri late
yesterday, leaving the trapped
secessionists with only one major
city still in their hands.
The federal government said
troops entered Owerri in the
morning. The federal commander,
Col. Benajmin A. Adekunle, of the
3rd Marine Commando Division,
had boasted that he would drink
tea in the teeming city on Sunday.
The Nigerian government an-
nouncement said civilianq already
were returning to the town and
occupying soldiers were looking
after them.
Scores of expatriates were be-'
lieved taking refuge in the area
around Ouerri. They included Irish
and British Roman Catholic
priests and nuns and at least 23
British wives of Ibos, the pre-
- - - - - - - I

loses, major city

I

'IRRESISTIBLE!"-UFI
COIuM81AACPUcRL ShnumS
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES

.r

dominant trible among the seces-
sionists.
Biafra Radio had denied reports
Monday morning that Owerri fell.
It quoted the breakaway state's
defense headquarters as saying
the town was firmly under Biafran
control.
But there was indication as ear-
ly as Saturday that the city was
under siege. Troops' returning to
Port Harcourt from the front 50
miles to the north said then that
government troops breached re-
sistance at the edges of the town.
The capture of Owerri means
the Biafrans, after 14 months of
civil war in Eastern Nigeria, have
only one remaining large town in
their possession-Umuahia, head-
quarter of the Biafran leader, Lt.
Col. C. Odumegwu Ojukwu.
Adekunle's 3rd Division was re-
ported 30 miles south of Umu-
ahia at Aba, which fell to the Ni-
gerians two weeks ago. The Ni-
gerian 1st Division, under Col.
Mohamed Shuwa, was pressing
south toward Umuahia from Ake
Eze also about 30 miles away.
Informal federal sources said
the government army's advance
has sliced away Biafran holdings
to the point where they now con-
sist of about 3,000 square miles.
When Ojuwku declared Eastern
Nigeria independent May 30, 1967,
Biafra consisted of 29,000 square
miles and included a population
of about, 14 million.
It was believed about six million
persons have crowded into the
area left to the secessionists. Most
of them are Ibos who contend the'
federal army is conducting a war
of genocide against them.
Despite the steady loss of
ground, there has been no ap-

parent move for a Biafran sur-
render.
Biafran Information Minister 1.
Y. Eke issued a statement yester-
day, indicating the regime would
continue the fight, Radio Biafra
reported.
The report of Owerri's fall came
as government troops told of
Biafran soldiers using roadcutting
bulldozers to slow advancing Ni-
gerian brigades.
The bulldozers were used to
chew craters in invasion routes
and stall federal columns for
sniper fire or direct assault. The
pits average about 40 feet wide
and 15 feet deep.
The informants said Biafrans
beat drums and shouted Ibo tribal
epithets in one such encounter
on a road they had cut northwest
of Aba. Some, lacking firearms,
battled with sticks.

You are invited to a

WELFARE
"Human Rights For

FORUM
The Poor-

U.S., Spain discus~s
m ilitary base pact
WASHIN$TON (P) - Secretary agreement "improved in it
of State Dean Rusk and Spanish tical content" as one observ
Foreign Minister Fernando Maria It. The agreement, he exp
Castiella began yesterday a final should mean the ungrading
round of conferences aimed at the present pact, "putting mor
renewal of a 1953 agreement un- ity into it," bit not its tr
der which the United States main- mation into a bilateral s
tains a network of naval and air treaty, as Spain was repor
bases in Spain. be seeking.
The 1953 agreement w a s re- The U.S. government, Sta
newed in 1963 f o r another five partment officials acknow:
years. It expires Sept. 26. has received a "substantial
Both American and Spanish pn l f a dis
sources were guardedly optimistic out what Spain wants in i
that the talks will produce a new h at Spain' wa nts i nm

How Will They Get Them ?"

WEDNE

SPEAKERS:

SDAY, SEPT. 18 7:30 P.M.
RACKHAM ASSEMBLY HALL
TOM KEENAN-Democratic candidate for
Congress; former director of Calhoun County
Department of Social Services
TIM SAMPSON-National Organizer, National
Welfare Rights Organization
WAYNE VASEY-1968 President, National
Conference on Social Welfare; Professor
at the School of Soc)al Work

;r - ---. . _ _ _ _ _ - - _

..-----

III

I

Millet

HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES
(Members admitted 30 min. early)
EREV ROSH HASHANA-SUN., SEPT. 22
Combined Conservative-Reform
at Rockham Auditorium, 7:30 P.M.

M

.

ROSH HASHAWA-MON. & TUES., SEPT. 23 & 24
Conservative at Rackham Aud., 8:30 A.M.
Reform at Rackham Amphitheatre, 9:45 A.M.

ATTENTION!
Petitioning for SGC SEATS
has been extended until
TUESDAY, SEPT. 17th
Pick Up Petitions at SGC Offices
1st floor of SAB

E:'=i

: !,

EREV YOM KIPPUR-TUES., OCT. 1
Combined Conservative-Reform
at Rackham Aud., 7:3,0 P.M.
YOM KIPPUR-WED., OCT. 2
Conservative at Rackham Aud., 8:30 A.M. & 4:30 P.M.
Reform at Rackham Amphitheatre, 9:45 A.M.

Sponsored by:

Social Work Studen t Union and Selected Faculty

_________I___if__ I

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