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September 10, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-10

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Tuesday, September 10, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

,Humphrey sees possible

troop slash

this year-

BULLETIN
DENVER, Colo. (-) - Vice
President Hubert H. Humphrey
declared Monday night he would
have had "no problem" in ac-
cepting the minority Vietnam
plank.proposed by doves at the
Chicago convention.
4 The minority plank called for
an unconditional halt of U.S.
bombing of North Vietnam..
PHILADELPHIA (P) - Hubert
H. Humphrey, opening his Presi-

dential campaign on the road yes-
terday, predicted t h e United
States would be able to remove
some of its forces f r o m South
Vietnam late this year or early
next year.
The Vice President told some
students "I c a n safely predict"
that unless there are some unus-
ual developments, t h e United
States will be able to start re-
moving some of its troops evenj
while negotiations are underway.
"But I would think negotiations

Nixon appeals to LBJ
for aid to Biafra

NEW YORK (p) - Richard M.
Nixon called. on President John-
sor yesterday to give "all the time
and attention and imagination and
energy he can muster" to the
African tribesmen afflicted by
starvation because of civil war in
Nigeria.
"America is not without enor-
mous material wealth and power
h

W ANTED:
Imaginative people
to teach at
creative secular'
Jewish Sunday School.
Coll
Jewish Cultural School
663-7428 or
S 761-8743

and ability," the Republican can-
didate for President said in a
statement issued through his New
York office.
"There is no better case in
which we might invest that power
than in sparing the lives of in-
nocent men and women and chil-
'dren who are otherwise doomed."
He resumes his campaign today
in a joint appearance with Gov.
Nelson A. Rockefeller and a speech
to a suburban audience inWest-
chester County, New York, and
then leaves tomorrow for another
speaking trip across the nation.
He left yesterday's campaigning
duties to his daughter, Julie, ard
her fiance, David Eisenhower,
grandson of the former President.
They presided over a news con-
ference in which young Eisen-
hower announced formation of a
"student coalition" of young peo-
ple for the Nixon campaign.

or no negotiations, we could start
to remove some of the American
forces in early 1969 or late 1968,"
Humphrey said.
In Washington, Secretary of
State Dean Rusk told questioning
newsmen he could not back Hum-
phrey's prediction.
So much depends on what hap-
pens in the Paris peace talks and
on the scene in Vietnam, "I would
jnot want to put any date on it,"
Rusk said of the withdrawal pros-
pect.
Also at the question-and-an-
swer session with students, Hum-
phrey expressed optimism about
the progress of the Paris nego-
tiations.
Speaking of "substantive nego-
tiations," he said, "It is my view
that those negotiations may start
before I become President."
PREACHES UNITY 4)
The Vice President, preaching
a sermon of unity, opened h i s
barnstorming tour in Philadelphia
before going to Denver and then
to Los Angeles.
Humphrey aimed in his opening
campaign to make an issue of his
Republican opponent's expressed
doubts about a nuclear non-pro-
liferation treaty with the Soviets
Union.
IMPORTANT STEP
"Let my position be clear," saidi
Humphrey. "I have no doubt about i
this treaty. It is one of the most,
important steps toward world
peace since World War IIL"
' Humphrey arrived in Philadel-t
phia in a ticker-tape parade, the
first the City of Brotherly Love4
ever gave a candidate. In some1
places the street crowds were five
to six deep; in others, they thin-;
ned out considerably.
Many people carried Humphrey,
signs. The VicevPresident often
had to speak over, the noise of
some demonstrators. These in-
cluded a small knot of hecklers,
mainly women. They stoop up and
burned cards apparently in a sym-
bolic voter registration card burn-
ing ceremony.

TREASON CHARGE EXPECTED:
Biaf ran leader to face trial
if captured by federal army

Soviets seek
Czech border
troop acco-rd
PRAGUE (1) - Slovak Communist party boss Gustav Husak met
yesterday with Soviet trouble shooter Vasily V. Kuznetsov to brief
him on conditions in his region of occupied Czechoslovakia.
Their talks in Bratislava were described as "frank and comrade-
ly," meaning no time was wasted on polite courtesies.
Kuznetsov, a Soviet first deputy foreign minister, has been here
since Friday conferring with top Czechoslovak leaders. His mission
is seen as an attempt to accelerate Czechoslovak compliance with
terms of the Moscow accord signed Aug. 28.
Reliable sources in Prague said the Communist leaders have
agreed to the stationing of troops along their country's border with
West Germany. These border forces are not among those the Soviet
Union has promised to withdraw from occupied Czechoslovakia when

LAGOS, Nigeria (OP) - Maj. ent civ
Gen. Yakubu Gowon, Nigeria's want to
military ruler, said yesterday he ,g,,.
would not trade the life of Biafranng
leader Lt. Vol. C. Odumegwu He ad
Ojukwu for peace in Nigeria's have bee
civil war. ing any
He said that if his troops caught workers
Opukwu inside the dwindling American
borders of Biafra, the seccessionist He ref
would be placed on trial for trea- with Pre
son, of Franc

ilians,"
swear

HHH brushes away parade confetti

said Gowon. "I:
it to God Al-

ded that the troops also
'n ordered to avoid harm-
of the scores of relief
from Europe and North
n now in Biafra.
used to take direct issue
sioent Charles de Gaulle
e who told a news con-

ference in Paris the possibility of
French ' recognition of Biafra
could not be excluded.
"He is head of state and he has
the right to say anything he wants
about any situation," said Gowon.
"I only hope he considers the im-
plication of any actions he con-
templates doing. I hope he does
not take action. I can never tell
the repercussions in this country."

"A simple charge," added Go-I
won, who served with Ojukwu in"
the Nigerian army before the se- H anoi reiterates dem ands,
cession and civil war in 1967.
He said he would not grant - ,
Ojukwu amnesty in return for a
surrend -old 115 bom bic
war:

ILLEL.
H. A PPENINGS
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13
Student Services at 6:15
followed by
Dinner at 7:00
and ONEG SHABBAT
Reservations Must Be Made
Call 663-4129 no later than 3 P.M.
Tuesday, September 10
Dinner-$1 50
HILLEL, 1429 H ILL STREET

WANT TO STOP
FEELING SORRY
FOR YOURSELF?
The Univ. of Michigan Tutorial
Project is sponsoring a program'at
the Mental HalfV ay House. WE
NEED YOU. People are needed to
spend one evening a week tutoring
and socializing with emotionally
disturbed women from ages 17 to
25 who have no social contacts
outside their home. For informa-
tion call Susan.Mintz, 761-7166.

i

I
k
l
I
t
f
t
r
,i

TREASON LAW
A newsman asked what the
penalty for treason was in Nigeria.
"We follow English law," an-
swered Gowon.
"In fact, it would be death,"
said the reporter.
"Thank you," said Gowon.
Gowon swore he has given or-
ders to federal troops closing in
on what remains of secessionist-
held Biafra to avoid a last-standI
blood bath of civilians.
An estimated six million persons
are jammed in 5,000 square miles
of what once was the 29,000-
square mile Eastern Nigerian re-
gion.
"There is not going to be any
indiscriminate slaughter of inno-

PARIS {41}-A Hanoi spokes-
man told the United States today
a simple bombing halt will not
be enough to insure peace in
Vietnam. He said American spy
flights, naval raids and artillery
attacks against North Vietnam
also must end.
North Vietnamese spokesman
Nguyen Thanh Le made the state-
ment at his weekly news confer-
ence when asked whether his gov-1
ernment would accept a simple
bombing halt as a green light for
serious peace negotiations.
Earlier Le acknowledged "the
positive" content of proposals
made by Senate Democratic leader
Mike Mansfield and by ex-Am-#
bassador Arthur J. Goldberg call-I

ing for an immediate cessation
of bombing over North Vietnam.
"The United ;States must un-
conditionally stop all bombing
raids and all other acts of war
against the territory of the Dem-
ocratic Republic of Vietnam,"
said Le.
He reiterated three precise de-
mands made by North Vietnam's
chief delegate Xuan5Thuy to Am-
bassador W. Averell Harriman
last June 19. They were:
-An immediate cessation of
air and sea raids on North Viet-
namese territory from Thanh Hoa
to Vinh Linh. ,
-An immediate halt of recon-
naisance flights, leaflet raids,
parachuting of commandos, smug-
gling of agents from ships and
from Laotian territory and any
other "military action infringing
on North Vietnam's sovereignty
and territory."
-The Americans will need to

the situation is "normalized."
Neither Prague nor Moscow has
announced the agreement, but
sources said it was one of seven
concessions in the Moscow accord
signed on Aug. 28.
Reports from Vienna confirmed
that Czechoslovak security meas-
ures have already been stepped up
along the Austrian border. There
was one unconfirmed report that
? Czechoslovak border sentries stop-
ped three would-be refugees by
firing bursts from machine pistols. -
NEED NO HELP
One Austrian official speculated
that "the Czechoslovak authorities
apparently want to prove to the
occupation troops that they can
protect their border alone."
Pravra, the Soviet Communist
party newspaper, said Sunday
Czechoslovakia was "taking t h e
first steps toward normalization,"
but that its leaders still had failed
to strike a decisive blow to "hos-
tile forces" in the country.
Th e stationing, of Soviet-bloc
trp along the Czechoslovak-
troopssum
West Germany border had been
one of the major sore points be-
tween Moscow and Prague during,
the tense months preceding the
invasion. Czechoslovakia insisted
it could take care of its borders
with West Germany without War-
saw Pact help.
CZECH PROMISES
Informants said the Czechoslo-
vak leaders also promised they
would:
--Change Czechoslovakia's politi-'
cal development to conform with
the conservative Soviet brand of
communism.
-Remove from office Interior
Minister Josef Pavel, Deputy Pre-
mier Ota Sik and Foreign Minis-
ter Jiri Hajek. Pavel has been re-
placed and Sik has resigned.
-Revive censorship to prevent
the news media from criticizing
the Warsaw Pact countries that*
participated in the invasion-the
Soviet Union, Bulgaria, East Ger-
many, Poland and Hungary..
-Repudiate the 14th congress
of t h e' Czechoslovak Communist
party, held secretly while party
leader Alexander Dubeck was a
prisoner in Moscow. It purged the
party presidium of .conservative,
orthodox Communists, but t h i s
has been partly nullified by elec-
tion of a new presidium.
-Withdraw Hajek's formal re-
quest for debate on the Czechoslo-
vak crisis by the U.N. Security
Council, Hajek, jdust before he left
New York after the Moscow agree-
ment, asked t h e Council to do
nothing more.
The Russians agreed, in turn, to
take their security police .w I t h
them when the occupation. forces
leavenand dropped a demand that
Czechoslovak leaders declare that
a "counterrevolution" existed in
their country, the informants said.

0

0

invasion
PARIS OP)-Charles de Gaulle
sternly lectured the Soviet Union
yesterday for invading Czecho-
slovakia and laid it to the post-
war division of Europe, saying this
was partly the fault of the United
States and Britain.
The 77-year-old President told
a news conference that the Big
Three agreements reached by
Joseph Stalin, President Franklin
D. Roosevelt and Prime Minister
Winston Churchill at Yalta in 1945
"delivered to Soviet domination
Eastern and a part of Central
Europe."~
The accords reached in the So-
viet Crimean city thus made it
possible for the Russians to inter-
vene in Czechoslovakia, he de-
dlared. France was not invited to
Yalta.
"The events in Czechoslovakia
appear condemnable to us," De
Gaulle said. "We held as favorable
the sign that this country was
tending to open itself a bit toward
the West. The return to obedience
obtained by force from the leaders
of Prague is just a new sign of
Soviet hegemony."
. He foresaw the day when So-
viet domination of Eastern Europe
would end. And he said the events
in Czechoslovakia had "momen-
tarily thwarted" his policy of con-
ciliation with the East. But he in-
sisted his policy "is the right one."
Meeting with about 1,000 news-
men, government officials and
diplomats in his resplendent Elysee
Palace, De Gaulle made these
other points:
-Referring to the student riots
and the strikes by about nine mil-
lion workers last May and June,
he said any new threat of violence
"must be broken or repressed."
-George Pompidou, dropped as
premier in July after six years in
office, had been put on "reserve
status" and had been asked to.
hold himself in readiness for an-
other task. This reinforced specu-
lation that Pompidou will be De
Gaulle's -choice as his successor.
-In -foreign affairs, he said
fear of absorption by the United
States was one reason why he is
delaying Great Britain's entry ii!-
to the Common Market.
-He said France might rec-
ognize Biafra, the sessionist state
now' engaged in a civil war with
the Nigerian government, He ac-
cused Nigeria of "employing war,
extermination and famine."

De Gaulle
condemns

.

.___
------

i

/

--,-*,

r4.UNIVERSITY
MUICAL SO0CI

i
,,

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
Tuesday, September 10 12:00 Noon
IKTE RNATIrKlAI CENTERD 6E Mni cd

ETY

r

IUN 1IClNf\ I I'.INA'L \LIN I L1X-
SUBJECT:
INTERNATIONAL UNDERS
TODAY'S IMPERAT
SPEAKER: PAUL R. Da
Director of Ecumenical Camp

Leu.. t iUiarecognize and deal with the Na-
tional Liberation Front, Phe Viet
STANDING: Cong's political arm on all mat-
'IYE ters affecting South Vietnam.
)TSONGoldberg, who headed the U.S.
pTSON delegation at the United Nations,
usand Mansfield have both advo-
'ONSORED BY THE I cated a bombing halt "to move
NICAL CAMPUS CENTER E forward to obtain an honorable
political settlement of the war."

FOR RESERVATIONS
CALL 662-5529

SP
ECUMEr

____,_

BEIT MIDRASH-College of Jewish Studies-1429 Hill St.
Registration & First Course Sessions: Wed., Sept. 11 and Thurs., Sept. 12, 7:30 P.M.
Open to Everyone-FREE
College level courses taught by University faculty
BASIC JUDAISM JEWISH MUSICOLOGY
BIBLICAL LITERATURE HEBREW LANGUAGE AND
Book of Ezekiel LITERATURE
Talmud For beginners, intermediates, advanced
CONTEMPORARY JEWISH HISTORY YIDDISH LANGUAGE
& THOUGHT AND LITERATURE.
For more information call 663-4129

I

EMERGENCY APPEAL

The Children's Community'

School faces

closing. We've unexpectedly lost the build-
ing we planned to use this fall. Please colt
us if you have any information about a

i
± ._._.

facility we might be able to use.
761-0663
761-8167

PRIOR TO BROADWAY!
MOLIFRF'S

SEPTEMBER 17-29

Want to see the Sandpipers'.
They're coming with
The Bob Hope Show
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
8:30 P.M.

Y V i-e i..tie
e

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