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September 05, 1968 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-05

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Thursday, September 5, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Paae Seven

Purdue steams for top

By CHUCK COWAN
When the hurley-burley's done,
when the battles .lost ond won,
Purdue should win the Rose Bowl
and carry the Heisman Trophy
back to Lafayette.
By all indications of what makes
a great football team, Purdue has
the material to rank in the top
ten teams in the nation and pos-
sibly reach the heights of number
one.
Keeping in mind that over half*
of last year's team, which was co-
champion with Indiana in 1967
in the Big Ten, and first in total
offense and defense for the con-!
ference, is returning, the outlook
is promising.
Last year's Boilermakers also
placed second in the NCAA for
total offense (423.6 average yards
*per game) and first with a new
NCAA record for the most first
downs (244).
It should also be noted that
Pui'due was ninth nationally for
its average game score (29.1
points), eleventh in the NCAA for
forward passes (199.0 yards av-
4 eraged per game) with a .491

completion percentage, and thir-
teenth in the NCAA for rushing
offense (224.6 yards averaged per
game, scoring 26 of 41 touch-
downs running).
Purdue is fortunate in having
28 returning lettermen, six first-
string offense, five first-string
defense, nine second-team offense,
and ten second team defense.
.sE9s.........#AW##sm25ms#

SCOUTIN(II
BIG TEN

from Purdue during coach Mollen-
kopf's 20 years coaching career.
Does it seem that Purdue has no
problems whatsoever and will flit
over the nation steamrolling
teams? Not really since Purdue
lost outstanding men both In its
offensive and defensive lines.
Coach Mollenkopf pointed out
"like any great team, it takes a
team effort, not just the work of
a few men. New men will be filling
line positions and early in the
season will be gaining experience."
Various personalities sparkle on
an already shining team. Keyes,
named All-American In 1967 by
10 major press organizations, was
the nation's major college scoring
.leader with 114 points. Keyes
enters his senior year with a great
shot at the Heisman Trophy. He's
listed as a halfback by Purdue,
but according to Coach Mollen-
kopf, Keyes can play any position
and excel.
Perry Williams is another yard-
age eater for Purdue, piling up
over 4.0 yards per carry. Williams,
Purdue's top fullback, should
compile a new rushing record.

TT3'Gonzales, Ashe, triumph in open
By The Associated Press
IPancho Gonzales once sniffing \\
victory, after getting into the
match in the second set, pounded
on Tony Roche like an angiry~
panther in yester da' s U.S. Open
STennis action.4
The 21-yeair-old Roche, iunner- ~N
up to Rod Laver in the Wimbledon .. .
% Open, won only two of the last 13
games.
Gonzales served savagely in the
final set, booming his 113 mile
per hour into the corners with
*deadly accuracy. He followed the
serve to the net for killing
oleys.
The seven -time professional
LEROY KEYFES PERRY WILLIAMS king, seeded No. 13, was joined in
the quarter-finals by Ken Rose-
Mikrerbc Phippstakes o'erfotind Qualt perse and o~-ah f wxall of Australia, who eliminated
ball News named him All-Ameir- w xith the abilities of a great coach tlne o omego ih
icnadbt PadUPI picked should take Purdue right to the land Falls, N.Y., 6-3, 6-3, 2-6, 8-6.s,'.
him for All-Big Ten. top-again. He -ilpa h wne fa

Three of the offensive starters
were All Big Ten. One of these,
Leroy Keyes, is better known as
"The Golden Mr. Do-Everything."
Now complete this compendium
of facts with the name of Jack
Mollenkopf, head coach at Purdue
for 12 years. Mollenkopf has an
all-time record (20 years) of 68-
35-9 (.647) and a 12 year Big Ten
record of 48-28-5 (.604). Eleven
All-Americans have been chosen

Crds sSe, Orioles hang on

Records shattered in olympic trials

By The Associated Press
LONG BEACH, Calif. - United
States Olympic swimming coaches
can't consider 13 an unlucky num-
ber.
That's the number of world re-
cords in the Olympic events which
fell during the men's and women's
trials determining the squads for
the Games at Mexico City next
#month.
The gals started it all with sev-
en records in their four days of
trials at the Los Angeles Swim
Stadium, including three by 16-
year-old freestyler Debbie Meyer.
Then the men took over at the
new Belmont Plaza pool in Long
4Beach and established six more.
SEVEN RECORDS
You coufld call it seven by
counting the /800-meter mark by
Lacrosse club
begis drills
Lacrosse, though a well-known
sport on the East Coast, especially
in Baltimore, is relatively unheard
of in the Midwest.
The Michigan L~acrosse Club
would like to enhance its image
as well as interest freshman in
the game. Though basically a
spring sport, the club has a fall
season to give newcomers a chance
to play the game before spring.
The first of two fall games
scheduled is against Michigan
*state at East, Lansing on Sun-
day, October 20. The lacrossers
will then face Notre Dame here
on the morning of Homecoming.
Acting coach, Larry Duke, will
be mainly interested in teaching
the fundamentals of the game
this fall. The extensive practice
sessions will meet Tuesdays
through Thursdays from 6 to 7:30
p.m. on the football practice field;
Asw sixgm sedsule will high-
light the spring season as the la-
crossers will meet Ashland, Bowl-
ing Green, Ohio University, De-
,.fiance, Ohio State, Michigan
State, and Ball State.
There is also the possibility of
a spring trip to the East Coast.

By The Associated Press
CINCINNATI' - Leo Cardenas
singled home two runs and Johnny
B:e cacked a two-rnhoro
trounced St. Louis 8-3 and snap-
ped a six-game losing streak.
Cardenas singled with the bases
loaded to snap a 1-1 tie in the
second inning. The Reds got a
third run in the inning on Deron
Johnson's sacrifice fly.

Sacramento's Mike Burton en
route to his smashing 16-minute,
8.5-second timing in the 1,500-
meter freestyle. That clipped 20
seconds off the pending world
record by Mexico's Guillermo Ech-
evarria.
Mike reached 800 in 8:34.3, a
recognized record but not an
Olympic event.
TOPNOTCH
Women's Olympic Coach Sher-
man Chavoor, who coaches Miss
NIGHT EDITOR:
ELLIOTT BERRY
Meyer and Burton on his Arden
Hills team at Carmichael, Calif.,
calls this the mast swift women's
team ever assembled.
George Haines of the Santa
Clara, Calif., Swim Club and
men's head coach, commented, "I
think the great comparison be-
tween this year's men's squad andl
that of 1964's -is better depth in5
practically every event." '
"We thought we'd be weak in
the backstroke and breaststroke,
but the youngsters showed some
strength we didn't know we had."
Asked how many events t h e I

men might sweep in Mexico City,
Haines answered, "I wouldni't
want to say, but we have a good
chance to sweep some events.",
He termed the Russians the
toughest team Uncle Sam's men
will face in Mexico City. Chavoor
figured Australia may have a
stronger women's team than ex-
pected.
Carl Robie, former Michigan
star and winner of the NCAA
championships in1966, was se-
One of the losers in the first
round of the IMFast Pitch Tour-
nament was th oe Moes
They lost 10-6, after trailing 8-0.
They lost to Sigma Phi Epsilon,
the fraternity division champs
last year. They play in te con-
solation round Saturday.
Remember, the games are on
South Ferry Field.
Today's schedule is:
4:30 Games
Field No. 1: Phi Epsilon Pi vs.
Gas Lighters.
tiFieldo. 2Public Administra-
Field No. 3: Wenley House vs.
Field No. 4: Firebrewers vs. Evans
Scholars "B".
5:45 Gaines
Field No. 3: Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Field No. 1: Kappa Sigma vs.
Fiel No. 2: Alphta igma Phi vs.
Reeves House.
Field No. 3: sigm Alpha Epsilon
Fies syNo. 4: Cryptorchids vs.
Sigma Nu.

BALTIMORE - Dave McNally
tagged a home run and won his
11th straight game, pitching the
Balimre Orioles to a 6- vctory
night.
McNally, 19-8 and unbeaten
since the All-Star break, weath-
ered a pair of early-inning as-
saults by the Yankees, including
consecutive homers by Bill Robin-
son and Andy Kosco in the
fourth.

Pilic of Yugoslavia and Dennis
Ralston, Bakersfield, Calif., which
was halted by darkness with
Pilic leading 6-2, 2-6, '7-5, 8-8.
The match will be completed
starting at 11 a.m. today.
Holmberg had a 4-1 lead in the,
fourth set but blew it after ques-
tioningahnet jdge's cal-l.als
sends Arthur Ashe of Highland
Falls, N.Y., the top U.S. Davis Cup
ace who is seeded fifth, against
South Africa's Cliff Drysdale, No.
16, conqueror of favored Rod
Layer, and Ashe's Cup teammate,
Clark Graebner of New York, No.
7 against big John Neweombe of
Australia, No. 4.
Ashe, Graebner and Okker are
the lone remaining amateurs.
Maria Bueno of Brazil reversed
the outcome of last week's' Na-
tional Amnateur final and defeat-
ed Margaret Smith Court of Aus-
tralia 7-5, 2-6, 6-3 yesterday in
the women's quarter-finals U.S.
Open Tennis Championships.
In the women's, Mrs. Court,
badly off her game, double-fault-
ed at match point. Her second
service hit the bottom of the net.
Miss Bueno will play the winner
of the match between top-seeded
Billie Jean King of Long Beach,
Calif., and South Africa's Maryna
Godwin.

LT. ARTHUR ASHE, one of three remaining amateurs, rolled
into the quarter finals of the U.S. Open Tennis Tournament,
beating Roy Emerson (above). Emerson, long considered a threat,
was not a match for Ashe Wvho recorded a most satisfyi ig victor'y
over the Australian Pro.
OPENINGS FQR MA LE
CH ILD CAR E WORKE RS
.-H AWT HOR N CENT ER
Work-Experience Opportunity with Emotionally
Disturbed Chidrn
Hawthorn Center offers mature students a unique
opportunity to work directly with disturbed children
in a creative, well-supervised, in-patient treatment
setting -- a particularly rewarding experience for
potential professional workers in Education Psy-
chology, Social Work, Medicine and related Be-
havioral Sciences.
Hours: 32 or 40 per week. Must be able to work
dys and weekends.
.Potential openings on evenings and rmidnight shift.

Major League Standings

NATIONAL LEAGUE

San Francisco
Cincinnati
Chicago
ittsbaurgh
Philadelphia
Houston
New York
Los Angeles

Wv
75
72
74
71
65
64
64
67

L
5
65
69
72
75
77
79
79

Pet.
.536
.526
.517
.504
.464
.454
.448
.436

GB
15 ~
16
25
26
27

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Wv L Pet.
Baltimore 516 .574
Boston \ 77 65 .540
,xCieveland 74 68 .521
New York 70 70 .5007
Minnesota 67 74 .475
xCalifornia 61 79 .436
Chicago . 59 82 .418
Washingto n 56t 83 .d402
Yesterday's Results
Baltimore 6, New York 3
Boston 10, Minnesota 2
Detroitaat Oakaknd, inc.
Cleveland at California, inc.

GB
12
1414
16
21~
26
29
31

Yesterday's Results
Chicago 7-4, San Francisco 6-5
Los Angeles 3, Philadelphia 0, night
'Cincinnati 8, St. Louis 3, night
Only games scheduled.

Age Requirement:

Minimum-20 years.

Education: Minimum-Two credit years c:omplet-
ed and good academic standing in thirdl year-.

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musiC for mnoderns
810 ~Midih

WELCOME!!
OPEN
MON. thru SAT.
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Near Michia-'n Theatre

Salary: With Bachelor's degree-$6786 per
Without Bachelor's degree-$5992 per

year
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Call or Write:

Director of Nursing
Hawthorn Center
Northville Michigan
Telephone: Area Code' 313-
Fl 9-300 8 a.m. to 4:30 p~m

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