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September 04, 1968 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-04

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Page Yen

THE MICHIGAN 'DAILY

Wednesday, September 4, 1968

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, September 4, ~I 968

I

ASHE ADVANCES:
Rookie stars in Tennis Open

Announcing-

Qpen Petitioning for two vacant
Student 'Government Council Seats
PETITIONS DUE TUESDAY, SEPT. 10
Pick up petitions in SGC offices,
1 st floor of SAB

TONIGHT 3 P.M.

(finished
at

in time for 2nd free showing of
Cinema Guild, to start sometime

Eisenstein's "Strike"
after 11 p.m.)

i

PRESENTATIONS AND W ORKSHOP DISCUSSIONS
AT FIRST MEETING OF
UM-Ann Arbor Chapter, Students for a Democratic Society
ASSEMBLY HALL, MICHIGAN UNION,
(ground floor near vending room)
Short introductions, break into issue/action workshops
to be continued next week

FOREST HILLS, !N.Y. MP)-Pro
rookie Cliff Drysdale of South
Africa broke Rod Laver's serving
rhythm with a murderous two-
fisted backhand yesterday and up-
set the top-seeded favorite to
make an open scramble of the
$100,000 U.S. Open Tennis Cham-
pionships.
His confidence and his awesome
left-handed power dulled to powd-
er-puff potency, the world's No.
1 ranking player fell before Drys-
dale's relentless back court bar-
rage 4-6, 6-4, 3-6, 6-1, 6-1 in a
fourth-round match.4
Laver served 14 doublefaults,
five in the final set and two in
IM softball
tourney begins
With today's opening round of
the All-Campus Softball Tourna-
ment,the Intramural Department
launches its outdoor fall program.
Fraternities, faculty members,
grads, independents, and residen-
tial halls will be battling each for
the All-Campus crown and ac-
companying trophy.
In all, 34 teams are entered in
this fastball affair, the first such
tournament offered by the IM de-
partment in the fall semester.
Since the changeover to trimest-
ers, softball hasgceased. to become
a spring IM sport, school ending
before the advent of good Weath-
er.'
The teams are guaranteed two
games; those losing their first will
play in a consolation round.
Games are scheduled for Ferry
Field in the late afternoons
throughout the next two weeks,
leading up to the semi-finals on
Saturday, September 14.
Two final games will determine
the top four places.
The schedule for today's first
round:
4:30 Games
FieldNo.1I-Hoover Movers vs.,
sigma Phi, Epsilon
Field No. 2-Biochem. vs. Phi
Delta Theta
ield No. 3-Green Giants vs. Phi
Kappa Psi
Field No. 4-Delta Tau Delta vs.
Psychology "A"
5:45 Games
Field No. 1-Higher Education vs.
Gamma Alpha
Field No. 2-Bioengineering vs.
H.M.D.
Field No 3--Nuclear Engineering
vs. Intruders
Field No. 4-Evans scholars "A"
vs. M. E.'sI

the opening game, which let loose
the landslide.
"I just never got hold of the
ball," the redhaired Aussie, win-
ner of every major crown, said
afterward. "I couldn't get my first
serve in court. Drysdale slaught-
ered my second one."
"I had never played Laver,"
Drysdale said. "But I got used toI
playing left-handers with Tony
Roche and Nikki Pilic. My stra-
tegy was to lay back and try to
beat Laver from the backcourt.
The strategy worked."
HANDSOME EIGHTa
Drysdale, 29, runner-up to]
Spain's Manuel Santana here in
1965, is a member of Lamar Hunt's
so-called "Handsome Eight" tour-
ing troupe. Laver is the star of]
George MacCall's rival National]
Tennis League, composed of older,{
players.
The tall, blond South African
was joined in the men's quarter-
finals by Australian John New-;
combe, another of the "Handsome
Eight" group and the two top U.S.
Davis Cup aces, Arthur Ashe of
Highland Falls, N.Y., and Clark
Graebner of New York, both;
amateurs. -
Ashe,the new U.S. amateur-
champion and the first Negro man
ever to win a major crown,
buoyed U.S. cup hopes by polish-
ing off Australia's rugged Roy
Emerson 6-4, 9-7, 6-3. Emersonn
now a pro, has been a bane of
U.S. amateurs for years.
Graebner, Ashe's hard-serving,{
bespectacled teammate, polished
off Gene Scott, an attorney from
Yale, 7-5, 6-0, 6-3. He had his big
service smoking:
LATE RALLY and
Newcombe, 1967 U.S. a n d
Wimbledon champion, had to rally
from two sets down and pull off
some of the most fantastic shots
of his career for a marathon vic-
tory over Torben Ulrich, the
bearded Dane, 5-7, 4-6, 6-4, 10-8,
6-4.
Ulrich led 7-6 in the fourth set
after Newcombe doublefaulted at
game point but Newcombe pulled
an immediate rebreak with two
lobs that the Dane couldn't touch.
Then in the 10th game of the
final set, Ulrich went sprawling
after another Newcombe lob and
killing volleys by the young Aus-
tralian, seeded fourth, pulled out
the match.
Another seeded player, Dennis
Ralston of Bakesfield, Calif., No.
6, was five points from defeat be-

li
sport s
NIGHT EDITOR:
JOEL BLOCK
fore he finally won a third-round
match from tiny Joasuin Loyo-
Mayo of Mexico 9-11, 6-2. 3-6.
7-5, 6-1,.
In two other interrupted third-
round matches, Tom Okker of the
Netherlands, topped pro Pierre
Barthes of France 13-11, 6-2, 7-5
and balding Ron Holmberg of
Highland Falls, N.Y., trounced
Bobby Lutz of Los Angeles, run-
ner-up to Ashe in the recent U.S.
amateur, 6-4, 11-9, 7-5.
A pair of British girls slammed
their way into the women's semi-
finals and now must look toward
an ultimate meeting with the
Wimbledon queen, Billie Jean
King of Long Beach, Calif.
Second - seeded Ann Haydon
Jones had trouble with 19-year-
old Paaches Bartkowicz of Ham-
tramck, Mich., but won 10-8, 6-3.
She next meets Virginia, Wade,
British Wightman Cupper who
ousted Judy TegartofAustralia,
the Wimbledon runner-up, 6-2,
6 2.L
NATIONAL LEAGUE

from the seat
Bill Levis
of mypants
Priority Four:
ThatIiagic Number

4

There are few things left at Michigan that take four years to
acquire.
With the introduction of advance credits and the trimester sys-
tem, students can and do graduate in 22 and three years.
New officers of UAC are appointed in their third year along with
Daily editors. Even first year students run for SGC positions.
And to add insult to injury, second year athletes star in varsity
sports and sometimes make All-American.
Only a priority four football coupon appears to remain as
a sign of longevity at Michigan.
Still, priority four is not enough by itself. It is the waiting up
the night before to be first in line for senior tickets that separates
apathetic sports fans from the true blue strugglers who have suffered
through the last three years with the Michigan football team.
It takes a certain breed to wait up for priority four tickets. These
are the hard-to-discourage sports fans who, though they sometimes
disagree with Bump Elliott, invision the possibility that, maybe this
year, Michigan will be the best football team in the Big Ten.
True, there are some four year students who only want 50 yard
seats for social status, but the majority wait because they believe in
the Wolverine football team.
Why else would they plant themselves before the Intramural
building doors the afternoon before those doors open for ticket
sales.
And it is that watiting-in-line that can be one of the most
interesting experiences in a student's college career.
Your roommate from freshman year, who you have diligently
tried to avoid for two years; may spend the night waiting for tickets
with you. Other former quaddie Friends will appear among the con-
glomerate of people who line Ea'st Hoover street by 2 a.m.
The steps leading to the IM building entrance are covered with
sleeping bodies huddled together in sleeping bags or wrapped up in
blankets.
The sweet smell of alcohol is everywhere. Still, there is some order.
A pro, a student who has been at Michigan more than four
years and has waited in line before, prepares a list of participants,
dating back to the previous afternoon when the first students
adorred the IM Building steps.........
'In a futile effort to prevent the chaos that follows, the pro reads
the list every tvo hours 'to make sure that people have not left to get
a night's rest before the big push in the morning.
The list is read at 2 a.m., but by four, everyone is too tired to pay
attention to it. Instead, people settle back to sleep or talk, resigned
to the wait until 8 a.m.
Around four, while most of the entries are sleeping, the alcohol
begins to take its toll. A heckler, voicing his dissent of the pro's list,
emerges from the crowd.
Yelling, "I'm number one," in reference to his position on the
list, the heckler destroys the sedate manner of the crowd, which had
submitted to the list.
The pro's attempt at keeping entries orderly- is quickly replaced
by a restlessness to be "first.
The heckler continues his tirade as the crowd moves closer to
the door. Screaming, "I'm the zoology club and I'm number one," the
heckler whets the participants' appetites to storm the front door. 4
"To the hell with the list, get to the door," becomes the battle
cry.

ORGANIZATION OF VOICE; PREVIOUS
YEARS ACTION; SEMINARS,
VISITING SPEAKERS
U. CURRICULUM, REQUIREMENTS,
GRADES & EXAMS, ETC.
(Jeff Schneider) -
REGENTS BY-LAWS, UNIVERSITY
GOVERNMENT (SGC Speaker)
UN'IVERSITY INVESTMENT
(Research Committee)

'68 ELECTION AND INDEPENDENT
PARTY MOVEMENT '(New Politics/
Peace and Freedom Party speaker)
BLACK PANTHER PARTY, HUEY
NEWTON'S TRIAL; SPEAKER FOR
BLACK ORGANIZATIONS ON
CAMPUS IF POSSIBLE
(Robbie Meeropol)r
CLASSIFIED & COUNTER-INSURGENCY
RESEARCH AT UM (Bruce Levine)

St. Louis'
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Chicago
Atlanta
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
Houston
New York
Los Angeles

W
89
74
71
73
71
68-
65
64
64
60

L
51
64
65
68
70
72
74
77
79
79

Pct.
.636
.536
.522
.58
.5114
.486
.468
.454
.448
.432

GB
14
16
16,
18'4
21 >4
231k
251?
2$ j

Everyone Welcome-All Voice meetings are open
MOVIES at 10:15 in 3-MN -(for people interested in seeing "Thunder
from Cuba and the Newsreel Project Over Mexico" at Cinema Guild, 2nd free
showing is around 9:45)
Subscribe to The Michigan Daily

Yesterday's Results
Chicago 8, San Francisco 3
Pittsburgh 3, Houston 2
Los Angeles 10, Philadelphia 9
St. Louis 5, Cincinnati 1, 11 inn.
New Fork 4-6, Atlanta 3-7, 2nd game
12 inn.I
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at Philadelphia (N)
St. Louis at Cincinnati fN)
SanLFrancisco at Chicago (2)
(Only games scheduled)
A I' A
AMERICAN LEAGUE

xDetrojt
Baltimore
Boston
xCleveland
xOakland
New York
Minnesota
xCalifornia
Chicago
Washington
x-Late game

not

W L Pet. GBH
87 52 .626 -
80 60 .571 71,
76 65 /.536 124
74 68 .521 14Y2
71 69 .507 16%4
70 69 .504 17
67 73 .479 2014
61 79 .436 26 4%

~ . S

t

58 82 .414
56, 82 .406
included.

Yescterday's Results
New York 6, Baltimore 1
Washington 2, Chicago 1
Boston 4, Minnesota 1, 5 inn.
Detroit at Oakland, ine.
Cleveland at California, inc.
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Oakland (N)
New York at Baltimore (N)
Cleveland at California (N)
Boston at Minnesota (N)
Chicagor at Washington (N)
WELCOME
STUMDNTS
* DISTINCTIVE COLLEGI
HAIRSTYLING for Men-
And'Women-
OPEN 6&DAYS
THE DASCOLA BARBI
Near Michigan Theatre

291/ At 6 a.m., any remaining hope of order is'broken. One of the pro's
henchman ascends to the top step and bellows, "Let's line up from
the door to the railroad tracks four abreast according to the list."
With that, the crowd, brought to a frenzy by the heckler, storms
the doors.
There are still two hours until the doors open.
t.The students, in order to retain their positions, sit down on
the steps, refusing to give up their hard won spot to anyone or
anything.
Shoving ensued but order is maintained. No fights break out
as the four-yearl men struggled to keep cement captured during the
night.
As it nears eight, the participants, back on their feet, begin, to
press forward towards the door.
Then at 8:05 a.m., it happens. The door, the object of so much
r concern during' the night, opens and the big crush is on.
ATE They run, they crawl, but all make it to the main. gymnasium
- where the tickets, worth more than gold, are waiting obediently for
them.

A

How do you tell
there's a
difference
between banks?
with a
National Bank
statement

I

ERS

It's over in an instant.
Four ,yearspf waiting. One night without any sleep on a
cold step. All for two football tickets on the 50-yard line.

r

x 0
Palace Quality
LUDERERS / DRY CLEANERS
~~Pone 663-4185

Banking at National Bank is a pleasure for students. We go out of our way to assist our stu-
dent customers with their special banking needs. Some banks think of students as just the
numbers of their checking accounts, but at National Bank, we don't forget we work with
people. Check which services you need:

I

" budget checking accounts-l0 a check, paid for ahead of time
in books of 25, so you don't have little dimes to keep track of (like
at other banks), and there are no other service charges
" free checking when you maintain a $200 minimum balance or $500
average monthly balance with our regular checking accounts
" Campus Office designed and staffed with you in mind-corner of
William and Thompson, just two blocks from Angell Hall
" all other bankiAg conveniences-money orders, travelers checks,
savings accounts, and so on.
When you start getting your National Bank statements this year,
you'll understand What a difference this "National Bank State-
ment" makes.

a
WILLIAM
NATIONAL
S ANKLIEx
x
r.-

4

a. am ENO=&. WRAMMI& APOU soft llAr

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