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September 04, 1968 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-04

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Wodhesday, September 4, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Wedhesday, September 4, 1 9~S THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

ohnson

forecasts

need

for

educational

funds

AUSTIN, Tex. W) - With stu-
dents heading back to school,
President Johnson released yes-
terday two reports that forecast
a need for billions more in public

by that same year-if the school
systems halt their march toward
lower pupil-teacher ratios and
increased preschool learning for
the disadvantaged.

rivasenoiUaia--anaper- As was said in the preface to
haps 500,000 more teachers - to "Education in the Seventies," one
mebt the education requirements of the booklets, the aim of the
Of the 1970s. experts was not to state federal
But the look-ahead was some- policy but to "stimulate discus-
thing of a blending of "ifs," sion about the needs for educa-
"ands" and "buts." tion in the 1970s."
0 For example, instead of needing Johnson put out the reports,
aotht 500,000 teachers by 1975, along with a memorandum from
one dodhient said, there could Wilbur J. Cohen, Secretary of
be a surplus of 700,000 teachers Health, Education and Welfare.

Cohen's memo to the President
emphasized the need for new bil-
lions and more teachers to con-
tinue what ex-teacher Johnson
clearly regards as the progress in
education during his administra-
tion.
But the fine print of the docu-
ments themselves offered alterna-
tive and often conflicting views
on the same topic.
In what taxpayers might regard
as the "good news" department,
there were these findings:
"The increase in enrollments
is very likely to taper off during

the next decade." With the crop
of war babies behind, total school'
enrollments in 1970 are projected
at 60.5 million students-not an
alarming increase from the 57.6
million estimated for the school
year just starting.
The battle against school drop-
outs is being won., if slowly.
Whereas 29 per cent of those now
entering the fifth grade drop out
before graduation, the Office of
Education panel said a continua-
tion of current trends would cut
this proportion to 22 per cent by
1970.

But the big unanswered ques-
tions in the minds of those who
prepared the reports concerned
willingness to expand the educa-
tion system to reach the goal of
fewer students per classroom and
to offer preschooling to children
of poorer income families.
They made it clear they would
like to see the ratio lowered-a
long-time goal in many communi-
ties-and to see the introduction
everywhere not only of free public
kindergarten but of mass-scale
nursery schools.
"It is very likely," they wrote,

"that in the 1970s we shall face
the crisis of equalizing educa-
tional attainment. The makings of
this crisis are already upon us."
Their feeling, so stated, in that
preschooling gives a boost to those
who otherwise might have trouble
in elementary school and, eventu-
ally, drop out. If this objective is
to be met, they predicted, 500,000
more teachers will be needed by
1975.
As for money, each report
pointed to increasing out-lays.
The second booklet, ,"Students
and Buildings," said that if

Johnson's stated aim to remove
financial barriers to a college edu-
cation is to be attained, direct
federal aid to students must be
increased by some 400 per cent
to about $21.1 billion by 1973. IL
This report also said the 1966-
67 gap between college tuition
payments and actual educational
costs of $2.2 billion is likely to
grow to $4 billion by 1972-73.
The President will return today
to the White House where he will
meet with the National Security
Council to review the global sit-
uation - particularly events in

Czechoslovakia and the reported
Soviet troop threat to Romania.
Johnson had been at the LBJ
ranch spending a lengthy vacation
at his Texas home.
Tomorrow he'll have another re-
view session with the Cabinet.
The Texas White House also
announced the resignation of
Sherwin J. Markman as an as-
sistant to the President.
The 39-year-old Markman, a
former Des Moines attorney who
spent nearly three years with
Johnson, is becoming a partner in
a Washington law firm.

. . . .............. . ........

Prices effective thru Saturday, Sept. 7, 1968. Rights reserved to

U.S.
CEI
0Chd
t t
lb.

D.A CHOICE BEEF
NTER BLADE CUTS

LEAN CENTER CUT RIB'

'4U union,
threatens
to strike
(Continued from Page 1)
aware that they are asking for a
strike vote," Reister said.
"It's sort of cocking the gun
they've got pointed at your head,"
he continued.
In separate but mutually agreed
upon moves, both the University
and AFSCME last week wrote to
state mediator Edmond Phillips
askirig him to help speed up the
15-week-old talks.
But mediators from the State
Labor Mediation Board have been
tied up in public school teacher
contract disputes and .have been
unable to attend the sessions here.
No date has been set for their
participation.
University employes were grant-
ed the right of collective bargain-
ing under Public Act 379 of 1965.
The University is currently chal-
lenging the constitutionality of
the act in the courts, but has
agreed to bargain collectively
while the court case is being
settled. A lower court ruled the
law constitutional, but the Univer-.
sity is appealing that decision.

.iean, }AeatY
mm CV
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J'News'

editor

'4.

Sliced into 9 to 12 Chops
PorkLo01W0 .00791.

enter Cut Smoked
Wlim Slices

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USDA CHOICE NEW ENGLAND STYLE
BONELESS BEEF

HICKORY SMOKED

SEMI-BONELESS

c

dies at 51
Funeral services will be held at
1:30 this afternoon at Zion Luth-
eran Church for Elwood Lohela,
city editor of the Ann Arbor News
for the past six years.
Mr. Lohela died Monday follow-
ing an extended illlness. He was
51.
He had been a member of the
News staff for 18 years. Prior to
joining the News, he had worked
for the Cadillac Evening News
and as a Public relations officer
for Carroll College in Wisconsin.
A native of Larium in the Upper
Peninsula, Mr. Lohela received his
BA and MA from the University.
He is survived by his widow and
three children.
Interment will be at Wash-
tenong Memorial Park.

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I

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