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September 04, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, September4, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pagc Three

IV .:., -,

DISORDERS REPORTED:
Czech reformist lead
while Soviets gain co.

By The Associated Press
Deputy Premier Ota Sik, father
of Czechoslovakia's projected eco-
nomic ties to the West, resigned
last night, Prague Radio reported.
Sik has been in Belgrade, Yugo-
slavia, since before the Soviet in-
vasion of Czechoslovakia on Aug.
g21.
Prague, radio said President

Ludvik Svoboda accepted the re-'
signation of Sik, who was one of
the moving forces behind the
ouster of former President An-
tonin Novotny from his job as
Communist party chief in Janu-
ary.
Sik's economic policies aggra-
vated the Soviet Union and he was
reported to be on a list of persons

er resigns
neessions
whom the Soviet leaders do not
want in leading positions in oc-
cupied Czechoslovakia.
The move came as the govern-
ment readied a new censorship
law that reportedly includes strict
measures such as a ban on re-
porting nlews from 'abroad other
than official announcements and
a ban on reporting on persons,
meaning any possible arrests.
Soviet forces began to pull out
of some Czechoslovak public build-
ings Tuesday as national Com-
munist leaders yielded to their
demands.
The Soviet government news-
paper Izvestia last night said oc-
cupation troops in Czechoslovakia
have been ordered into cities
bordering West Germany because
of disorder there.
"In recent days, reactionary
forces have succeeded in stirring
up disorder in some areas on the
Czechoslovak border with WestI
Germany," the newspaper' said.
The article linked the reported
disorder with the "anti-Soviet
hubbub now taking place on the
banks of the Rhine."
In Prague occupation troops
withdrew from the headquarters
of CTK, the national news agency,
the radio station at Bratislava,
President Ludvik Svoboda's head-
quarters in Kradcany Castle and
most ministries.
Soviet soldiers still guard the
Ministry of Defense and the Min-I
istry of the Interior, which con-
trols the police.
In a related development, Sec-
retary of State Dean Rusk has
accepted the word of Soviet Am-
bassador Anatoly F. Dobrynin that,
his country does not plan an in-
vasion of Romania, the state de-
partment reported yesterday.
- SHOW

Nigeria to alow
aid to BiafranS
LAGOS W - Nigeria agreed yesterday to lift its block-
ade of secessionist Biafra temporarily and permit the Inter-
national Red Cross to airlift food and medicine to thousands
of starving civil war refugees starting tomorrow.
Until now, the federal government had threatened to
shoot down unauthorized flights into the breakaway republic.
The Red Cross canceled flights for a time last month after
the Nigerians fired on its planes.
A federal Ministry of Information statement said Red
Cross planes based on the Spanish off-shore island of Fernari-
do Po could fly relief supplies to air strip Annabelle in the
secessionist - held Uli - Ihiala "_l_-
area for 18 days.
The Red Cross agreed, in turn, ollat
to "immediately use its influence"
in getting the Biafrans to consent
to the opening of a land and wa-
ter relief corridor, the ministry. OUie s
said. The Biafrans have balked at
the opening of an overland land
corridor, contending it could beia
used by advancing federal troops. H1 an
?Agreement on' the flights was
'reached during a meeting here be- By The Associated Pecss
tween Nigeria's chief of state Ya- ecesrcvee usa h
! kubu Gowon, August R. Lindt, In- Rescuers orerd Tuesday the
ternational Red Cross coordinator bodies of tore than 300 Iranian
for West Africa, and Swiss Am- earthquake victims killed when
bassador Dr. Fitz Neal. themakesift
4iey r - "neiv~r+nng reaneu ouuap

-Associated Press
Birth control controversy
Patrick Cardinal O'Boyle, Roman Catholic arch bishop of Washington speaks in Washington D.C.
about the suspension of one priest in his archdiocese in connection with a controversy over birth
control. O'Boyle says that although the Pope's re cent ruling is not "infallible," it is nonetheless the
doctrine of the church. '
BACKLOG OF BILLS:
Congress ,ruconv w" ees

a
i
'

-Associated Press
Happy anniversary
and Mrs. Hubert Humphrey stroll hand-in-hand
is of their Waverly, Minn: home. They celebrated

Vice President
on the ground

their thirty-second wedding anniversary yesterday.

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WASHINGTON W) - Congress'
reconvenes today faced with a
long list of demands from Presi-
dent Johnson, but with its mem-
bers more concerned about their
fate at the polls Nov. 5.
Leaders said they feel they
have about four weeks to try to
wind up 1968 business.
After that, Senate Democratic
YC grenades
hit evilians

1'

Leader Mike Mansfield of Mon-I
tana said, it may be impossible to!
kee p a quorum as more and more
members leave Washington for
the campaign trail.

they havet
tion but a
and southe
to try to
filibuster.

If you missed the SOP]

Mass Meetfing don't worry about it!
Petitions are still available
in the Soph Show office
on the 3rd floor of the League

HI

SAIGON W)-Viet Cong gren-
ades wounded 15 Vietnamese in
Saigon yesterday. Police patrolled
the streets in heavy numbers to
thwart a further resurgence of
enemy terrorism inside the capi-
ital.

In 1964, when Congress also re- Six majo
sumed work after the national run the go'
political conventions, final ad- financial y
journment came Oct. 3. 1, remain
If the 1968 session is to end White Ho
around the time, it is clear that a :billion Oef
number of the 40 must items listed Congress
by the President will have to be legislation
dropped. tf ols but , 1
He announced such a list Aug. 5 fight over
shortly after the legislators began elude regis
their .recess. However
Mansfield raised the possibility many oth
that Congress may have to recess dent's Aug
again in October for the election
drive, and then return in Novem-
beut he said it is, conceivable N ix
that only the Senate will have to
stage a post-election session. This
would be to act on confirmation
of the bitterly disputed nomination or
of Abe Fortas to be chief justice
of the United States and on rati-
fication of the nuclear nonpro- By T
liferation treaty. Both im
The Fortas no'imination has not for the
even been cleared by the Senate finalized
Judiciary Committee so far. opening]
If it reaches the Senate floor, it paign-an
is expected to bring on the hottest ticipatea
debate of any remaining item of than has
congressional business. t cent cam
Administration forces contend Richard

the votes for'confirma-
a band of Rej ublicans
rn Democrats threatens
prevent action with a
or appropriations bill to
vernment in the present
year, which began July
to be cleared td the
use including the $72
ense measure.
is likely to pass new
broadening gun con-
there will be a Senate
whether this will in-
stration.
, prospects are dim for
er items on the Presi-
5 list.

Lindt was reported to have gone'
after the meeting directly to Fer-
nando Po where he will lead the
first Biafran mercy flight sanc-
tioned by federal authorities.
4The Red Cross and other pri-
vate groups have been flying In
food and medicine to Biafra at
night, but these flights have been
able to provide barely a fraction
of the sup plies needed for the
mass of civil war refugees threat-
ened by disease and starvation..
Because of the urgency of Bi-'
afra's food crisis, the Red Cross'
announced in Geneva .Monday it
would defy the Nigerian blockade
by initiating a massive relief air-
lift by daylight.
Nigeria replied that it consider-
ed itself absolved from "any re-
sponsibility arising out of the con-
sequences of any unauthorized
flights."
But yesterday's - negotiations
broke the deadlock-at least for
the present.

thywr eng treated collapses
under the impact of an aftershock.
The bodies, most of them band-
aged from earlier injuries, were
found huddled together in the
wreckage: of a collapsed school
building th~t had been con'verted
into an emergency hospital in the
eastern Iranian town of Ferdous
after Saturday's big earthquake.
The building was leveled by an
afternoon shock Sunday.
Saturday's initial quake'claimed
1,500 of Ferdous' townspeople, but
officials said the one Sunday was
more intense there.
The death toll throughout east-
ern Iran was officially estimated
at 11,000 to 11,600 but unofficial
estimates put it at 14,000.
Meanwhile, a strong earthquake
struck northwestern Turkey on
the Black Sea coast yesterday.
The Ministry of Interior said 15
persons were killed and 200 were
injured in or near Bartin, a city
of 14,300 inhabitants 200 miles
northeast of Istanbul.

I'

ii

The grenades went off in front
of the U.S. Agency for Interna-.
tional Development headquarters
on one of the capital's busiest
streets and in front of a bar in
the city's dock area. No Americans
were hurt.

on Humphrey finish plans
'leisurely','68 campaign

____ _ - _.___._ __--- - --- - 7 ~

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'he Associated Press
najor party contenders
presidency yesterday
their plans for the
portion of the cam-
nd both seemed to an-
a more leisurely trek
been common in re-
npaigns.
d M. Nixon launches

NG

1,

i

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DIAL
8-6416

I'll

"EXCEPTIONALLY POWERFUL, IN
BOTH CONCEPTION AND
EXECUTIQN! A HIGH LEVEL OF
CREATIVE CINEMA!"
-Time Magazine
"DAZZLING AND TO THE POINT!"
-Penelope Gilliatt, The New Yorker
"BRILLIANT! REMARKABLE!"
-Joseph Morgenstern, Newsweek j
"FEW FILMS ARE WORTHY OF
BEING CALLED ARTISTIC: THIS
IS ONE! Brilliantly accomplished!"
-Hollis Alpert, Saturday Review
HOR5ENIRN1
IS FEAR
A CARLO PONTI PRESENTATION-
DISTRIBUTED BYIX SIGMA air. A FILMWAYS COMPANY

his campaign today, starting in
Chicago, scene of violent dis-'
orders during the Democratic
Convention last week.
An aide said the move was
not designed to capitalize on
the issue of "law and order,"
probably a key question in
Nixon's battle with Vice Presi-
dent Hubert H. Humphrey, the
Deiocratic nominee.
"Chicago was always on the
schedule for the kickoff trip,"
Nixon's aide said. "Illinois is
one of the big key states we are
zeroing in on sand Chi ago Is
the place to start."
He said the city was not listed
when Nixon's itinerary was an-
nounced from his Florida vaca-
tion headquarters because "the'
Illinois organization wanted to
make the announcement."
Nixon is scheduled to be in
six cities in the next five days,
Chicago, Sanj Francisco, 'San
Jose, Calif., Houston, Oklahom
City and Pittsburgh. A member
of his staff said he might make
a stop in ,Washington on his
his way back to New York City.,
Meanwhile Humphrey confer-
red with his campaign manager,
Lawrence F. O'Brien, yesterday
on the organizatiodn and sched-
ule for launching his cam-
paign next week.d
As the two, and other ad-

visers, met in what Press Sec-
retary Norman Sherman de-
scribed as informal attire around
the Vice President's kidney-
shaped swimming pool, Phil-
adelphia was confirmed as the
first stop when formal cam-
painging starts Monday.
Humphrey' plans to fly to
Philadelphia fromi Minnesota
next Monday after his week
rest in Waverly, Minn. Other
stops are planned later that day,
probably in Boston and San
Francisco, before he heads to
Los Angeles and Texas next
Tuesday.
Sherman said Humphrey does
not plan to attend today's meet-
ing in Washington of the Na-
tional Security Council, of which
he is a member.
O'Brien, who- is doubling as
dharman of the Democratic
National Committee, spent the
night in the pine-paneled Hum-
phrey homestead guest house.
In Miami, third party presi-
dential candidate George Wal-
lace said yesterday he may
scrap plans for a national con-
vention for his third party and
hold state conventions where
the laws require nomination by
convention.
Wallace announced he was
considering the move when he
arived in Miami for a rest.
Wallace predicted he will de-
feat Democratic presidential
nominee Hubert Humphrey and
GOP choice Richard Nixon in
his third party drive for the
White House.

I

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A
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Pu SK
PRESENTS

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N

MASS MEETING
WED,, SEPT. 4a
UNION BALLROOM
1.30 P.M.

r R \ a
b
i

i

C l

BACH CLUB
Program :
DR. DAVID CRAWFORD
will speak on
"THE BRANDENBURG
- CONCERTOS:
Contrasts in Instrumental Styles"
Thursday, Sept. 5, 8:00 P.M.
GUILD HOUSE-802 Monroe
Jelly donuts and conversation
afterwards.
Transportation provided from
meeting.
For further information call
769-2922, 769-1605,
or 663-6361
NSOW
Doris Day
R4n KAith

Ii'

MASS MEETING
THURSDAY-SEPT. 5
UNION BALLROOM 8 P.M.

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