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September 01, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday, September 1, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1 v

CIVILIANS TRAINING:
Romanians fear attack

Russian

troop

BUCHAREST, Romania (R) -
Thousands of Romanians donned
brown milita overalls yesterday for
a *eekend of paramilitary train-
ing as the armed forces stepped

II veterans staged target prac-
tice and teen-age girls rattled off
the nomenclature of Soviet-made
rifles.
Border authorities in eastern
and northeastern provinces were

up combat readiness amid reports said to have received fresh reports
of Soviet troop concentrations of Soviet armor moving behind
along the country's unprotected the Prut River. Intelligence was
borders. . reported to have located Soviet
Weapons drill was held on divisions in Moldavia and Bessar-
tightly guarded factory grounds abia, former Romanian territories
and army bases where World War seized by the Russians during the

war. Estimates ranged from 15
to 27 divisions.
The regime of President Nico-
lae Ceausescu, architect of Ro-
mania's policy of independence,
maintained an air of outward
calm while working behind the
scenes to try to find a political
settlement to the East European
crisis.
Communist sources said Ceau-
sescu has appealed to Moscow andj
its four hard-line allies to give
firm guarantees that Romania
will be spared Czechoslovakia's
fate and to create conditions for
a settlement by withdrawing the
occupation troops from that coun-
try.
CEAUSESCU'S PLEA
In an emotion-charged speech
Friday at the Transylvanian city
of CluJ, Ceausescu again plead-
ed with the Russians to "prevent
a deepening of differences" in the
Comunist camp.
The Romanian leader reported-
ly sent a memorandum to the five
occupying pact members-Bulgar-
ia, East German, Hungary, Poland
and Russia-asking that the
Czechoslovak issue and Romania's
request for non-intervention
guarantees be placed before a
conference of ruling Communist
parties, the meeting to be conven-
ed after the Warsaw Pact armies
have left Czechoslovakia.,
As a price for such guarantees,
Romania was said to be ready to
renew a 20-year friendship a n d
mutual assistance treaty with
the Soviet Union. The pact con-'
cluded in 1948 expired earlier this
year and was not renewed because
of a controversy over terms the
Romanians considered incompati-
ble with their independent poli-
cies.
JOIN WARSAW PACT
The Bucharest government also
was scid to be' willing to make a
formal declaration of loyalty to
the Warsaw Pact alliance f r o m.
which it has practically with-,
drawn in recent years.
Other concessions reportedly of-
fered included participation of
Romanian forces in pact maneu-
vers outside Romania, more trade
with East European partners and
larger contributions to foreign aid
for developing countries.

will remuain iu
Czecholvk
hl vkBULLETIN

Page Three
Is
LI

WASHINGTON M - The United States said yesterday the
influx of Soviet troops into Czechoslovakia changes Europe's
military security picture and, therefore, the Western Allies
will take a new look at their defenses.
The U.S. statement was issued by the State Department
after a hurriedly convened meeting of North Atlantic Treaty
Organization ambassadors.
PRAGUE (M - Defense Ministei Martin Dzur said yester-
day ,Soviet-led occupation forces in Czechoslovakia total
about 650,000 men, but he insisted progress was being made in
getting them out of towns and villages into "special areas."
President Ludvik Svboda was reported to have told the
cabinet that Moscow expects

-Associated Press
Youth admires portraits of Svobodaa nd Dubcek
MIDWEST IS KEY:
HHH maps campaign,

" Associated Press
Pres. Ceausescu (left) tours his country
L NOMAR DEMa

WAVERLY, Minn. (2) - Hu-
bert. H. Humphrey is planning
a grueling campaign which aides
see as a "concentrated version
of the classic 1960 Kennedy-
Nixon scrap, with the great de-
bates once again the key.
"We're going to take off run-
ning and never stop until elec-
tion day," predicted a cam-
paign aide.
The campaign, according to
intrviews with Humphrey advi-
sors, will be streamlined and
more emphasis on question and
answer sessions with audiences
rather than formal speeches
will be the format.
"The old days of the audito-
rium rallies at 9:30 at night are
over," explained an aide.
Humphrey aides predicted a
"non-stop and tough campaign
for both Humphrey and Repub-
lican nominee Richard Nixon."
They pointed out that both
Humphrey and Nixon have only
seven weeks to pack'in what the
late John F. Kennedy and
Nixon did in 17 weeks in 1960.
The short campaign is due to
the lateness of the two national
conventions this year.
The Humphrey aides see the
campaign shaping up this way:
Humphrey, like Kennedy in

1960. will concentrated on the
big northern industrial states,
border states and California.
Nixon will put niore emphasis
on the south, midwest and the
mountain states, together with
the border states.
"The places to watch," said
an aide, "will be midwestern,
states like Ohio, Michigan, and
the border states of Missouri,
Kentucky, Tennesses and Mary-
land." -
' Humphrey aides said they ex-
pect the California battle to be
much tougher than in New
York where a poll at the time of,
the Republican convention
showed the vice president sev-
eral points ahead of any GOP
candidates.
The Humphrey aides see the
vice president as having little
chance of winning states like
Georgia, Alabama and Miss-'
issippi.

"But in other states in the
south-like South Carolina and
Florida we have a 'fighting
chance" said an advisor.
Much, of this chance, the
aides said, depends on the vot-
ing of southern moderates and
Negroes, therefore a strong ef-
fort will be made to register Ne-
gro voters.
A South Carolina poll at the
time of the GOP National Con-
vention showed that Humphrey
would narrowly win a three way
race over Nixon and third party
candidate George Wallace. But
this poll, said one aide, was de-
pendent on a "good Negro turn-
out."
Another key state was listed
as Texas by the aides. They feel
the key in the Texas campaign
will be how much campaigning
President Johnson and Gov.
John Coijally will do for Hum-
phrey.

to keep two divisions -35,000
to 40,000 men-in the eoun-
try permanently.
Although Russian a r mo r
tried to remain unobtrusive, it was
very much in evidence in Prague
and the countryside.
Peasants complained that troops
are occupying farmland and inter-
fering with their crop harvests.
They also charged t h a t planes
used to spray crops were not al-
lowed to take off.
Soviet 'troops occupied , most
government offices, newspaper,
radio and television stations, the
university and t h e Academy of
Sciences.
Underground newspapers, which
continue to publish despite official
censorship reported that Soviet
security men were placed. in all
government, ministries, Ii b e r a1
Czechoslovak leaders were Ubeing
ousted, and the National Assem-
bly was discussing amendments to
passport legislation, presumably
to curb travel to the west-.
One uncensored press report
said the Moscow-sanctioned cen-
tral committee of the Czechoslo-
vak Communist party was meeting
to elect a new presidium sprink.
led with conservatives acceptable.
to the Kremlin.
There are currently two central
committees - one recognized by
Moscow that existed before the
occupation, and a new one elected
by reform leaders at an under-
ground congress last week. Both
are led by reformist Communist
party boss Alexander Dubcek.
Free radio broadcasts estimated
that 25 persons were killed- and
400 were wounded by the invading
troops. They said about 170 of the
wounded are still in hospitals.
The reported entry ofRussian
experts into key government po-,
sitions came despite the accord
worked out in Moscow. It provided
that occupation troops would leave
Czechoslovakia when the situation
"normalizes" and would not Inter-
fere in the country's internal af-

Hoovyer
WASHINGTON (P-FBI direc-
tor J. Edgar Hoover warned yes-
terday of a plan by the so-called
New Left movement to "launch
widespread attacks on educational
institutions this fall."
Hoover said the main thrust
anises from the Students for a
Democratic Society. He added that
leaders are relying on college dis-
sidents and militants to bolster
and 'accelerate campus disorders.
Obviously timing his words to
the return of students to the cam-
pus in a few days, the FBI' di-
rector said this poses a serious
threat to the academic community
and to society as well.
He cautioned edlucators, public
officials and law enforcement of-
ficers against ignoring or dismis-
sing lightly "the revolutionary
terrorism invading college cam-
puses."
Hoover's remarks, in the current
isue of the FBI Law Enforcement
Bulletin, accused extremists of
using the guise of academic free-
dom and freedom of speech to
seek a dialogue "when actually
what they seek is a confrontation
with established authority to pro-
voke disorder."
Hoover added: "Encouraged by
their 'success' at Columbia the
anarchists of the New Left move-
ment are boldly spreading the
word that they intend to 'create,
two, three, many Columbias'..
But he expred confidence in
the other mlin of college stu-
dents who he said "represent both
the hope and the shape of the
future."
He said "they are far better
equipped than any preceding gen-
eration to participate construc-
tively in developing solutions to
the many complex problems con-
fronting our nation."

"ANOTHER BERGMAN SMASH FOR STRONG TASTES-AND,
STRONGER INTELLECTS!" In a dream-like sequence, love-
making begiuis before assembled erotically posed onlookers. The
imagery builds, the visual pace surges violently. THIS IS A
DAZZLIR."
-Cue Magazine
"HOUR OF THE WOLF"'
MAX VON SYDOW - ULLANN
SPECIAL SHORT ATTRACTION
Renata Adler, New York Times film critic,
says "A DAY WITH TIMMY PAGE" is
"one of the best recent films,

NrAV$
"

ON SEPTEMBER THIRD:

National news roundup
By The Associated Press east of Gonabad and 500 miles
TEHRAN, Iran - A devastat- east of Tehran, the spokesman,
ing earthquake rocked approxi- said it was too early to estimate
mately 750 square miles of eastern total casualties.
Iran yesterday afternoon causing * *
heavy damage and casualties, a HOUSTON - Surgeons made
Red Lion and Sun spokesman an- medical history yesterday when!
The Red Lion and Sun is the t ey transplanted ,the heart, one
Iranian equivalent of the Red lung and two kidneys from a
Cross. young woman into four men in
Basing his information on first simultaneous operations.
urgent messages which reached The corneas of the donor, a 20-
the capital from the remote area ya-l hoigvci, as
near the village of Kakhak, south- year-old shooting victim also
were removed and placed in an

1930-1 st

Paris to

New York non-stop

flight was made.

mmommommmmmmeI

, I

ti
"
r

1943-Allied troops landed
'mainland.

on -Italian

1967-Sweden became last country on
contine'nt to switch to right-hand

SUNDAY AND LABOR DAY (MONDAY)-3-5-7t9.
TUESDAY thru THURSDAY-7-9

driving.
1968-Annual

GENEATION >'
represents the literary
artistic uhiversity
community'
BE PART OF IT
MASS MEETING
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 4, 1968
2nd floor of the'
Student Publications Building
420 Maynard St.
n fnli1 1A

Soph

Show Mass

Meeting

NOW
Dois DaY
Briao eit
"ith S0ix You
Color by Deluxe. Filmed in Panavision'.
Released by National General Pictures.
A Cinema Center Films Presentation.
3020 Washtenaw Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor

e3
tr
st
a
hf
tk
n
h
ti
ti
as
be

ye bank.,
It was a major day in he r t
ransplant history, too, with three
ich operations taking place
cross the United States - one
ere,, one in Pittsburgh and ano-
her in Stanford, Calif.
Dr. Michael E. DeBakey, inter:
ationally known surgeon who
eaded the five teams performing
he multiple operations here, said
his was the first time for as many
s four organs from one donorto
e transplanted.

Sfairs.

will' be held in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre at 7:30 P.M.
Become a part of history, sophomores-
be at the Soph Show Mass Meeting
on September 3rd.

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PRESENTS
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151
A CARLO POW
DISTRISMEDo SYXKIG h~

Across: Campus',
Sunday, Sept, 1 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.--Cinema
2:00 p.m.-"The King and His Guild will'present "Sunset Boule-
Court" baseball exhibition team vard" at the Architecture Audi-
will play a local team as part of torium.
the University Activities Center 8:30 p.m.-The Labor Day
Labor Day Weekend , activities. Weekend Hootenanny will'be held
Tickets available before the game on Palmer Field.
at the University baseball stadium. Moniay, Sept, 2
1:00 p.m.-The Labor Day
Weekend Dance Concert will be
DIAL held oni Palmer Field.
8-'641 69:00 p.m.-The Labor Day
Weekend Concludes with an out-
EPTIONALLY POWERFUL, IN door movie, .featuring "Under the
BOTH CONCEPTION AND Yum Yum Tree" with Jack Lem-
ECUTION! A HIGH LEVEL OF mon and Edie Adams. Tickets are
CREATIVE CINEMA!" available before the showing at
-Time Magazine the University Baseball Stadium.
:ZLING AND TO THE POINT!" Wednesday, Sept. 4
nelope Gillicatt, The New Yorker Guild will present Sergei Eisen-
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema
RLLIANT! REMARKABLE!" Guild will present Sergei Eisen-
oseph Morgenstern, Newsweek stein's' ."Strike" and "Thunder
EW FILMS ARE WORTHY OF Over Mexico" (cut from "Que
NG CALLED ARTISTIC. THIS . Viva Mexico") at the Architecture
NE! Brilliantly accomplished!" . Auditorium.
-lollis Alpert, Saturday Review Thursday, Sept. 5
7:00 and. 9:05 p.m.-Cinema
Guild will present Sergei Eisen-
stein's "A Time in the Sun" and
iEnn "Eisenstein."
Satur4ay, Sept. 7
FE R7:00 and 9:05 p.m.--Cinema
PRLSEN Tino'Guild will present Akira Kuro-
MA HL ILMWAYSC OM sawa's "The Seven Samurai" at
the Architecture Auditorium.

i
i
ia

I-

Cp

MASS MEETING
THURSDAY-SEPT. 5
UNION BALLROOM 8 P.M.

'I

iH.

116

jA

A,

GUITAR. STUDIO
INSTRUMENTS
ACCESSORIES

'I

LESSONS

its

1

1 ns~tru menl

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