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January 20, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH E 2nd GREAT
DEPRESSION
SOUP KITCHEN
OPENS AGAIN
TO)DAY!!
at.
(noonish)
fresh cheap exotic, erotic soup and
other stuff

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

pale three

B

ttii

Tuesday, January 20, 1970 Ann Arbor,,Michigan Page Three
I?........... Guild Hose faces fiancial ill
By JOHN HILDEBRAND campus ministries, of our state Arbor Draft Counseling Center Among items completely drop-
>. & .' .. Guild House, the campus min- and national funds." a few years ago. ped were:
}fistry on Monroe Street, has been The current budget for Guild A couple of months ago a stu- -regular Friday evening din-
a part of the University scene House is $28,113. This is a cut dent called and said she was ners, set up like the luncheons;
for four decades, offering every- of nearly $3,500 from last year climbing the walls, Edwards re- -an nteifaith service pro-
thing from informal lunchtime As a result, many programs counts. "She just needed some- ject;
_rap sessions to free draft coun- have had to be pared, if not body to talk to. We helped her -funds for sending students
seling. dropped altogether through it. She drops by here to worthwhile conferences;
Recently, however, a financial One service getting the pinch regularly now." Guild House continues to plan
squeeze has forced a cutback of is the Guild's bargain weekday Guild House is funded pri- projects for this spring, includ-
some of the services. The money luncheon - 25c for sandwiches, ing a retreat in February on
crisis is due to a decrease in cookies and beverage. While the "Life Styles in Transition," ad
funding from some of the price will remain cheap, at least estant denominations, the Unit- a writer in residence at Guild
ed Church of Christ and the awie nrsdnea ul
Guild's denominational sup- for the time being, Edwards ex- Disciples of Christ, as well as House.
porters. plains, "We've had to put up a two local churches But projects take money. One
"The financial cutback is not big sign recently asking people source Guild House has recently
because of something we've done to take only one of everything." But like many churches across been tapping is a large and
or not done," explains the Rev. The three-man staff of Guild the nation, these have, in the faithful alumni body
J. Edgar Edwards, director of House devotes much of its time past few years, begun to channel "As it looks right now," Rev.
Guild House. "Simply, in the to couriseling. Edwards, along more money into the inner city. Edwards says, "we'll squeak
last three years, we've had to with Rev. Ronald Tipton, was As a result, Guild House has through with some shortages
face cutbacks, along with other among the initiators of the Ann undergone some belt tightening. and reduced programs.

Presents
NIKOLAIS DANCE THEATRE

Hill Auditorium

the
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

WEDNESDAY, JAN.21at8:30

PROGRAM:
MANTES (from IMAGO); NOUNENOM and
TENSILE INVOLVEMENT (from SOMNILO-
QUOY); TOWER (from VAUDEVILLE of the
Elements); TENT
TICKETS: $6.00, $5.50, $5.00, $4.00, $3.00
LECTURE-DEMONSTRATION
Tues., Jan. 20 at 8:30 - $1 .0
Musical Society Office in Burton Tower-Ph. 665-3717

sinle. Shows Now on sale!
1111 UNIVERSTY
OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL 10
THEATRE
OGM "'W

FLORIDA'S GOVERNOR CLAUDE KIRK yesterday rebuffed
the Supreme Courts' order of immediate desegregation.
The governor personally delivered motions to the court declaring
that Florida is "financially and physically unable" to follow the
court's edict to desegregate the state's schools by February 1:
Kirk said funds were not available for such a massive operation
and that he is ordering school boards not to spend any unbudgeted
money to accomplish integration. "There is no way I can provide the
money this would take," Kirk said, "but I could have it budgeted by
next September."
The motions, and another filed by Lousiana, asked for a speedy
rehearing of the cases in which the court on January 14 ordered im-
mediate desegregation for about 300,000 school children in five
southern states.
SECRETARY OF STATE WILLIAM ROGERS voiced hope.
Saturday that the talks between the U.S. and Red China opening
today in Warsaw will lead to an easing of tensions and to agree-
ments for exchange of visitors and' trade.
In an interview with U.S. News & World Report magazine, Rog-
ers spoke of the Nixon administration's efforts to improve relations
with both China and Russia.
While not specificallydisclosing new proposals the U.S. will make,
Rogers said, "U.S. policy is not to exploit the quarrel between the
Communist rivals. Major armed conflict between them would be bad
for America in the long run."
A 14-YEAR OLD SCHOOL BOY was taken into custody
by a U.S. marshal today after he defied a federal judge's order
which prohibited him from attending his neighborhood school.
Ray York, of Oklahoma City, had been assigned to another
junior high school under a temporary school integration plan ordered
into effect last August 13 by a U.S. District Court.
The Oklahoma City Board of Education filed suit against the
York family, contending Ray's refusal to attend his assigned school
was disrupting the integration plan. The boy's mother was informed
that Ray would be kept in custody during the school day and re-
turned to his parents at night.
AN AMERICAN SHIP carrying 5,000 tons of food for starv-
ing refugees from Biafra neared Logas yesterday as 11 tons of
British medical supplies arrived there by plane.
U.N. Secretary-General U Thant reported that Heinrich Beer,
head of the League of Red Cross Societies, has returned from a
visit to what was Biafra finding "no hint or even the slightest, re-
motest evidence of violence or mistreatment of Ibos by federal
forces."
Thant told reporters before leaving Lagos for Paris Sunday that
outside help to Nigeria can only be given with the consent of the
Lagos government.

Congress opens,
begins debate on
WASHINGTON flP-Congress yesterday convened its elec-
tion-year session with a politically tinged debate over spend-
ing as Democrats challenged President Nixon's threat to veto
a bill appropriating $1.26 billion in health a n d education
funds he doesn't want.
The prime matter of the Senate calendar was the veto-
threatened appropriation proposal, to supply more than $19.7
billion to the Department of Labor and the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare for a bookkeeping year al-
ready more than half over.
The White House has declared that the bill, with its
budget-increasing funds for -

education and health
would fuel inflation.

items,

EAST GERMAN LEADER WALTER ULBRIGHT answers ques-
tions during news conference in Berlin.
Ulbricht asks Bonn

JANUARY26 -31 '
1.=. Pnfelua lrremiercl
JS TRIANA'S
I.

FEBRUARY 2-14

Crsetedby
David Wheeler

HELEN JAMES
HAYES STEWART
TorectdbWA
STEPMN POrn1#
RIOR TO URSaIWaT!

l~i bpI aUC4Inf au is I ndOIA
l~l.L ~ .7"'-V 1

BERLIN 'P) - Walter Ulbricht,
leader of East Germany, came be-z
fore Western newsmen for the first
time in nine years yesterday and
called for full diplomatic recogni-t
tion of his regime by West Ger-
many.1
The West Germans took his re-x
marks to mean that East Germany
is ready to sit down with envoys
of Chancellor Willy Brandt from
Bonn. They said they were going
ahead with plans to propose for-
mal meetings on renunciation of
the use of force.
The news conference in East
Berlin's Council of State building
was attended by about 400 cor-
respondents, invited from East and
West. Ulbrich, who is 76, appeared
in good health.
Referring to Brandt's announced
intention to propose a renuncia-
tion of force agreement, Ulbricht
said a treaty covering that sub-
ject would have to await the re-
sults of similar talks between Bonn
and Moscow.
It was Ulbricht's first new con-
ference before Western correspon-
dents since the Berlin wall was
built in 1961. .
"Concerning the wall," he said,
"there is nothing more to discuss."
This dampened the Brandt gov-
ernment's hopes of having a
dialogue with East Germany to
get better conditions, for example
in travel, for the divided German
people.
Ulbright accused West German
reactionary forces and the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization of
exploiting East Germany when the
border between East and West
Germany was open.
Chosing his language carefully,

Ulbricht did not rule out German
reunification. But, he said, it
would come only after "democratic
and Socialist" forces had gained
the upper hand in West Germany.
As for isolated West Berlin, U-
bricht said only that it did not
belong to West Germany and never
would and that he knew of no
four-power responsibility for East
Berlin and East Germany.
"We are a sovereign state," he
declared. "Our capital is Berlin."

"Sometimes it seems as though
the administration's hold down on
spending, in certain areas, is ac-
centuating the livability gapand
making a bad situation. worse,"
said Sen. Magnuson <D-Wash).
Sen. Hugh Scott (R-Pa.) ack-
nowledged that politicking will
shape the appropriation debate.
"Both sides will seek political
advantage, I suppose, this being
an election year," Scott said. "But
I believe the issue favors the Re-
publicans."
Scott said that is so because it
involves the administration's ef-
fort to keep federal spending in
check and thus control price-
boosting inflation.
But the administration con-
tends the problem is not one of
appropriations figures, which in-
clude funds for future outlays, but
of immediate spending.,

Poh. Sci. group
to hold eletion
A mass meeting of the Under-
graduate Political Science Asso-
ciation (UPSA) will be held to-
night at 7:30 in room 1025 Angell
Hall.
The purpose of the meeting will
be the election of new officers
for which nominations will be
taken from the floor. The meeting
will be open to all political science
concentrators and other interested
political science students.
Among the officers to be elected
are a president who will also
serve as a member of the execu-
tive committee of the department,
a secretary, three members of the
Undergraduate Affairs Commit-
te. Also to be elected are positions
on the steering committee of
UPSA and a chairman for the as-
sociation's evaluation committee.

BLASTS SYSTEM
State judge resigns position

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-SATURDAY REIEW
A FRANKOVICH PRODUCTION
FOR COLUMBIA RELEASE

A highly respected circuit
court judge has resigned his
position, leveling vicious criti-
cism at Michigan's legal court
and prison systems.
Stewart Newblatt, a Genesse
County judge of eight years,
sent his letter of resignation to
the Supreme Court, stepping
down from his post with five
years of his term remaining.
Newblatt, 42, is leaving his
*office in mid-term simply be-
cause he no longer cares to be a
judge in a "barbaric" penal sys-
tem.
"I can no longer apply an
archaic and cruel divorce law
that prevents a court . . . from
properly performing in the best
interests of the parties, the
children and the public," New-
blatt wrote in his letter of
resignation.
Newblatt noted in the letter

that his eight years as judge
had been "rewarding and in-
structive." He complained, how-
ever, that about 75 per cent of
his job was simple administra-
tion, which "although extreme-
ly important, is not practicing."
Regarding our "barbaric"
penal system, Newblatt wrote,
"The public apparently doesn't
care, is not informed or does not
feel any responsibility for these
conditions. . . The offender will
be released from prison worse
off than when he entered.
"And so I have elected no
longer to remain a judge, a pas-
sive participant in this game of
justice," Newblatt concluded,
"rather, to return, to private
practice where I can once again,
apply what I have been trained
to do-practice law."
In a Detroit Free Press inter-
view, Newblatt focused on the

critical problem of divorce cases
-"the fau concept, whereby
one party blames the other for,
say, adultery, and then files for
divorce.
"Now 99 out of 100 divorce
cases are settled on the basis
of fault. But you never really
know who the person at fault is
and what the hell does " that
have to do with it, whether it's
fault or not? The quesiton is:
Do these. people have any pos-
sible rational hope of establish-
ing a permanent relationship?"
Newblatt also discussed the
proposed new state penal code
which he considered "brilliant,
well conceived, skillfully drafted
and humane."' He decried the
fact, however, that the bill Is,
in his opinion, stalled in Lans-
ing without any apparent
chance of passage.
See STATE, Page 2

RADICA L F1 LM SERIES THE BA LC NY
PR ESENTS
Directed by: JOSEPH ST RICK
Starring: Shelly Winters, Peter Falk, Ruby Dee, Lee Grant
In this fantastic film based on Jean Genet's brilliant Theatre of the Absurd, a milk-
man becomes a general; and a gas-meter reader becomes a bishop as they, among
others, escape from the falseness of life into the falseness of their dreams. With the
action set against the background of a revolution, D e a t h, the one ultimate
reality, is the only act not permitted in THE BALCONY, where each man's dream
comes true for a time-and a price. Even the chief of police and the rebel leader
have their fantasies: only Irma, the madam of this unusual brothel, is free from
self-deception. When she bids us return to our homes to resume our lives where
everything is even falser than what we have seen in her house of illusion, you'll
think about it ..,
"Relentlessly funny, shaggy, shocking . . . ferociously brilliant . . ."-Time
"Delightful farce . . ."-Newsweek

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