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January 18, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-18

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TRY OUR STYLING
24 HOUR SERVICE
OUR FALLS ARE GREAT
14-25 inches long
STARTING AT $39.00
La Viva Wig Salon
109 E. LIBERTY
Phone 761-0642

page three

( P

ti1

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Sunday, January 18, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

11

' .the
newS today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
THE THREAT of guerrilla warfare in Nigeria faded as
vanquished soldiers of Biafra turned in their guns for food.
Lt. Col. Philip Effiong, the last leader of the former Biafran state,
said there would be no resistance to reuniting with Nigeria.
Officials asked Ibos to trust other Nigerians and other Nigerians
to embrace Ibos. State authorities moved to return jobs to Ibo civil
servants.
Meanwhile, a four nation international observer team went back
to the front yesterday, after reporting Friday it had found no evidence
of misconduct.
U.N. Secretary-General U Thant arrives today for talks with
Nigerian head of state, Maj. Gen. Yaubu Gowon.
CONGRESS RETURNS tomorrow to start an election-year
session and faces immediate confrontation with President Nixon
over federal spending in education programs....
Nixon has threatened to veto a $19.7-billion appropriations bill
passed in the House last session for the Department of Health, Educa-
tion, and Welfare and Department of Labor. Senate passage of the
bill is expected this week.
The promised veto and an attempt by the Democratic-controlled
Congress to override it will mark the start of a session-long struggle
between Congress and the White House leading up to the November
congressional elections.
Crime, welfare reform, farm legislation, electoral reform, voting
rights, and postal reform are other major items on the agenda.
FEDERAL INDIAN POLICY is in need of a total revamping,
a Senate-House Economic subcommittee reported yesterday.
Government paternalism, show-piece programs,confinement to
the reservation, assimilation in mainstream society all have had one
thing in common the subcommittee reported: they have not worked.
According to statistics available, the Indian's life is relatively
short, his infants are more likely to die, his own bad health contri-
butes to his unemployability, and suicide and suicide attempts are a
major concern of the Indian Health Agency.
The Indian unemployment rate is an average 50 per cent, soaring
to 80 per cent on some reservations. Average family income is put at
$1,500 a year.
U.S.-CHINESE AMBASSADORIAL TALKS will reopen in
Warsaw on Tuesday after a two-year lapse.
Secretary of State WilliamP. Rogers said yesterday that he hoped
the talks will Lead to an easing of tensions and deals for exchange of
visitors and trade.
"We have been in what has been described as a cold war period
for about 25 years, and I believe we are leaving that period," he said.
Rogers said it has been made clear to both Peking and Moscow
that the United States intends to go ahead with discussions with both,
with the aim of improving U.S. relations with each and not with the
idea of causing trouble between them.
* * *
THE GOVERNMENT announced it will tell the nation's 43
commercial airlines they must end pollution of the skies with
jet-engine smoke by 1972.
The Department of Health, Education, and Welfare estimates
.all existing Boeing 727, Boeing 737 and Douglas DC9 jetliners can be
converted to smoke-free operation at a cost of $3.5 million by that.
date.
The airline industry, however, says it will take until 1974 and will
cost $30 million.

PRESENTS
ichigras,
(April, 1970)
PETITION NOW FOR CENTRAL COMMITTEE
( No UAC Experience Necessary)'
. CARN IVAL-booths, rides, promotions
* CO-ORDINATING ARTIST.
1 AWARDS and JUDGES
" PUBLICITY-PROMOTIONS
* ENTERTAINMENT
* TICKETS and USHERS
! SPECIAL EVENTS
* SECRETARIES
* TREASURER
PETITIONS AVAILABLE IN UAC OFFICE
2nd FLOOR, MICHIGAN UNION
763-1107-763-1256
PETITIONS ARE DUE WED., JAN 21

-Associated Press
Modern Gold Rush
Crowds jam the street outside a New York City office building, hoping millionaire James Brody Jr. is
inside and that he will want to share his fortune with them. Brody, 21-year-old heir to an oleo-
margarine fortune, had promised the world he would give away $25 million. Last week he report-
edly gave $100 bills to Harlem children, and $2,504 to a man with mortgage problems, among others.
At last report, however, Brody had left the country._
PRiVATE SCHOOLS:
sla dea
SC 00 S C .VOI eS r R 1011

Agnew
returns

JACKSON, Miss. (A') - Two for immediate desegregation of 30

weeks of intensified school deseg-
regation in Mississippi have pro-
duced this general pattern: ac-
ceptance by whites where they are
the majority and mass pullouts by
whites where they are not.
Integration, where it took place,
was peaceful. Reluctant whites
apparently accepted Gov. J o h n
Bell Williams' advice to "make
the best of a bad situation."
One U.S. Justice Department of-
ficial said that, over-all whites
had taken "pretty well" the U.S.
Supreme Court's order, .put into
effect during the past two weeks,

Mississippi school districts.
But in at least five districts the
order has only produced a new
kind of segregation.
Canton public schools wound up
with 99-per cent-plus black en-
rollment as whites fled to a new-
ly ,formed private academy to
avoid a 3-1 black majority.
In rural Wilkinson County, on-
ly two of the district's 799 white
students enrolled in public schools
where 2,757 blacks attend. The
two were there, their father said,
because he could n o t afford to
send them to a private school.
Four of Kemper County's five

I.

""'

LI

UNION-LEAGUE

Proposal demands increase
lin minority-group admissions

BR

H

(Continued from Page 1)
Marcus added that "The facul-
ty has been negligent and delin-
quent in terms of assuming its
responsibility for catalyzing Uni-
versity change in the area of
minority affairs."
In addition Marcus emphasized
that the expanded admissions pro-
gram must not be at the expense
of blacks.

"The University might try to
play minority against minority,
and we definitely don't want this,"
says Bernardo Euereste, a CAM
organizer. "If there are currently
200 scholarship places open, for
instance, we don't want to reduce
the number of blacks taking those
places, but rather to extend the
number of scholarships available."
BSU member Walter Lewis says

he recognizes that the University
might pit the blacks against the
Chicanos, but believes "that we
will be able to work together." BSU
Executive Secretary Henry Ber-
nard Clay also issued a statement
saying that the admissions pro-
posal was vital and that "The BSU
supports the admission of all op-
pressed groups."
Also included in the strategy to
improve the condition of minority
students will be a drive to involve
all student groups in the issue of
minority admissions.

schools wound up all-black as all
but 53 of the system's 793 whites
abandoned the public system.
Amite County officials felt a
system segregated by sex would
help ease the transition by shel,
tering females from males of a
different race, but only 166 of the
county's 1,461 whites reported for
classes.
Noxubee county 'officials faced
a two-pronged problem - neither
whites nor blacks wanted to go to
public schools.
Fewer than half the county's
872 white pupils accepted inte-
gration in the system where blacks
hold better than a 4-1 majority.
Blacks boycotted the system al-
most entirely in protest of a de-
segregation plan they said did not
go far enough.
For those who could not accept
integration in any form, it meant
dipping into their pockets to send
their children to the estimated
100 "instant" private schools that
appeared following the court or-
der.
Most districts fell somewhere in
between the extremes. Justice De-
partment figures indicated the
white exbdus over-all was 1 e s s
than expected. Enrollment figures
showed attendance at about 80
per cent of the preintegration fig-
ure, but the count did not take
into consideration normal absence
teeism.
Exceptions to the pattern came
at areas where adult leaders in the
communities organized either to
support public schools or f o r m
private ones.
One such was Yazoo C i t y, a
town of 13,000 which borders the
heavily black Delta region. Whites
there held numerous town meet-
ings to express support for public
schools, and their efforts proved
successful.
Five more Mississippi districts
are under order to open under to-
tal integration by Feb. 1, includ-
ing the Jackson municipal dis-
trict, the state's largest with more
than 40,000 pupils.

from A. sia
U.S. determined
.not to 'bail out'
small countries
HONOLULU ( - Vice Pre-
' sident Spiro T. Agnew, head-
ing homeward from his Asia-
Pacific tour, said yesterday
the United States is determin-
ed to avoid being called on
"to bail out" small countries
when there are flareups with-
in their borders.
He said he thinks he succeeded
in making Asian leaders under-
stand and accept that aspect and
the rest of President Nixon's poli-
cy, which stresses regional coopera.
tion in defense.
Agnew said Asian leaders made
it clear to him they want "a con-
tinuing U.S. presence in the Paci-
fic" and he declared he doubts
"there will be any appreciable
diminution of American ability to
maintain its commitments."
Agnew agreed with the propo-
sition thatthere are "great simi-
larities" between the Nixon ad-
ministration's desire to avoid in-
volvement in the internal difficul-
ties of Asian countries and the
position of many U.S. senators who
fear another Vietnam-type-In-
volvement. He called most of the
dispute between the Senate and
administration "merely political
differences."
The highlight of his trip, Ag-
new said, was "a personal impres-
sion of Vietnam and to see how
good the morale is there, and
seeing how well the members of
the Vietnamese government are
getting along, not only with each
other but how well they are get-
ting along with their efforts to
improve the pacification program
and secure better communications
with the villages and hamlets."
He said he is returning from
Vietnam "very much more op-
timistic than when I left." But he
added that "nearly every leader
irho ever returned from Vietnam
was more optimistic than the si-
tuation justified him to be, so I'm
very cautious about my optimism."
Asked whether his optimism
meant U.S. troop withdrawals
could continue at the present pace
or possibly accelerate, Agnew said:
"I don't think we should even
'continue to discuss the rate of
withdrawals."
He is sympathetic, he said, to a
view expressed to him by Prime
Minister Lee Iuan Yew of Sing-
Spore. that "it is playing into the-
hands of the enemy to forecast
for him exactly what's going to
happen and when it's going to
happen."
Agnew said that maintaining
U.S. commitments, a point he
stressed at every stop on his tour,
is consistent with prior U.S. policy
but that the Nixon doctrine differs
In "the general stimulation of re-
gional cooperation."
He hedged on the possibility of
future U.S. military assistance to
the five-power arrangement in-
volving Britain, Australia, New
zealand, Malaysia and Singapore
that is being developed to fill the
void left by the British with-
drawal from Southeast Asia next
year.
"I don't think we can specifical-
ly expect any military involvement
in that situation at the moment,"
he said.
' The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University, of
Michigan, News phone: 764-0552. SecAon
lass postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mic-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published dily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-

sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
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mail.

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"Hopefully student groups will
try to engender the interests of the
white students to completely sup-
port the demands of the black
and Chicano groups on campus to
increase admissions for the min-
ority students," says Marcus. "The
vast majority of students will not
tolerate token responses of t h i s
elitist and racist institution."
"The University shouldn't take
the stand of an apologist," he
adds, "but it should aggressively
pursue the problem."
U.

Come In Any Afternoon
420 MAYNARD

Single Shows Now on Sale

!

SENATOR ABRAHAM RIBICOFF

THE UNIVERSITY ______

LAST 3 DAYS
"FANNY HILL1" staorts Wednesday

OF MICHIGAN ___
PROFESSIONAL
THEATRE
PROGRAM

* Liberal Senator from Connecticut
* Former Governor of Connecticut

IS t 1 111iZ
Impassioned and impressive!
Signals perhaps a new
boldness in American
cinema! Extraordinary!"
-Timt

NOW 4TH WEEK
dames Bond
iiiback! j

* Nominated Sen. McGovern, 1968 Democratic Convention
* Former Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare

JANUARY 26- 31
I. aer. leali. remiere-Is

FEBRUARY 2 -14

" Authored 1967 Highway Safety Act

iOS TRIANA'S
r

i

HELEN JAMES
HAYES STE WART

Tickets on Sale at Union, Fishbowl, and Door

i '

"I stronglyrecommend 'Me-
dium Cool.' Needless to say,
- .. . .....------. (. Pcrtmw* P ure prarts

i

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Paranocxrt PKCures txaents

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