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January 17, 1970 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-17

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Saturday, January 17, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Pae SevAn

a,.1 y c ..r c. v

,:.;

i M'

lcers

win

in

a

brawl,

6-2

BLIND DRAW:
NFL completes realignment
following eight month hassle

By JIM BERLUCCHI
With action reminiscent of the
tantamount entertainment of the
Roman empire, the Michigan
Tech Huskies were fed to a pack
of famished Wolverines at t h e
Coliseum last night.
In a contest including ferocious
brawls and incessant exhibitions
of fisticuffs, Michigan dumped the
highly-touted Huskies 6-2.
Outstanding in the victory was
Wolverine goalie Karl Bagnell as
he caught, turned aside, and kick-
ed out 46 Tech shots. "He really
kept us inthe game", praised
Coach Al Renfrew. ,
The real crowd pleasers how-
ever, turned out to be those many
Wolverine brawlers who partici-
pated in the numerous melees
which typified the brutal tone of
the game. The flow of both the
second and third periods inter-
mittently featured flailing sticks
aid fists among the hostile rivals.
The Huskies seemed to score
most heavily in these fights, ef-
fecting 12 collective stitches
among the Michigan icers while
the Huskies suffered one dislo-
cated shoulder.
Michigan capitalized on the
goal scoring opportunities, how-
ever, thus winning the important
score.
Wolverine captain Dave Per-
rin opened the scoring in the
first period in a scramble in the
goal crease. Perrin jolted the fal-
tering puck past the Tech goalie
at 8:55.
Harried back-and-forth action
continued until senior Don Deeks'
climfaxed Michigan's relentless

Huskies humbled

Score by periods:
Michigan Tech 0 2 0-2
Michigan 2 2 2-6
FIRST PERIOD SCORING: 1. M-
Perrin (Gagnon, Deeks) 8:55; 2. M-
Deeks (Perrin) 15:56. PENALTIES: MT
-Shillington (Slashing) 3:07; M-Shaw
(Slashing) 3:07; M-Falk (Holding)
11:06.
SECOND PERIOD SCORING: 3. M-
Slack (Gagnon, Marra) :59; 4. M-
Straub (Shaw, Cartier) 10:50; 5. MT-
McLeod (Unassisted-penalty shot)
13:10; 6. MT-Boxer (Tucker, McKnight)
19:15. PENALTIES: M--Marra (Inter-
ference) 2:07; MT--Murray (Charging)
7:01; MT-Pushie (Roughing) 11:51;
M--Marra (Roughing) 11:51; M-Per-
forechecking with the second tally.
Picking up his own point blank
rebound, Deeks backhanded t h e
puck home.
The second period opened with
the same heated action of the
first. Brian Slack bolstered t h e
Michigan lead in the first min-
ute on a beautiful rink wide pass
from Bernie Gangon. Slack scoot-
ed around the defense and deftly
maneuvered the puck past the
Tech netminder-
Gaining momentum, the Wolver-
ines continued to beleaguer the
Huskie defense. Their efforts re-
sulted in a fourth straight goal
by the stick of Buck Straub.
The play was hardly one-sided
however, as Bagnell persisted in
producing brilliant clutch saves.
At one cr ucial point he turned
aside a lone Huskie attacker who
was later rewarded a penalty shot
for his initial effort.
The crowd then thrilled to the
enraged debut of Coach Renfrew
on the ice. His furious reaction
to the judgment intensified the
all ready seething emotions.

rin (5-Slashing) 11:51; MT-Moffat
(Slashing) 11:51; M-Don Heyliger
(Bench Penalty) 13:10; MT-Grisdale
(Roughing) 14:09.
THIRD PERIOD SCORING: 7. M-
Cartier (Unassisted) 5:03; 8. M-Mal-
lette (Gamsby) 13:48. PENALTIES: MTi
-Tucker (High-Sticking) 1:51; M-
Gagnon (High-Sticking) 1:51; MT-
Murray (5-Fighting) 7:51; M--Slack (5-
Fighting) 7:51; M--Shaw (High-Stick-
ing) 11:05; M--Cartier (High-Sticking)
14:29; IT--Shilington (Illegal check)
17:16.
GOALIE SAVES:
McRae, MT 7 7 9-23
Bagnell, M 16 15 15-46
The Tech defenseman, Al Mc-
Leod succeeded in beating Bag-
nell on the disputed call, for
Tech's first tally.
Bagnell redeemed himself how-
ever, in the subsequent minutes as
the Huskies continually pounded
the net. Bagnell's fantastic saves
saved his team as he allowed only
one more goal in spite of a mul-
titude of blistering Huskie shots.
The third period featured the
most vicious and time consuming
fights of the game. Both collec-
tive and individual sparring and
sticking matches erupted contin-
ually on the Coliseum ice.
Michigan finally put the con-
test out of sight on a supreme
effort by "Punch" Cartier. Steal-
ing the puck around mid-ice, the.
burly defenseman stickhandled the
puck into, out from, and back the
Tech zone. Emerging from a myr-
iad of pursuers, Cartier unleashed
a terrific 25 foot scoring blast,
along with an unprecedented roar
from the Michigan partisans.
The sophomore's efforts were
complemented by freshman Rick
Mallet's first Michigan career goal
a few minutes later. Mallette clos-
ed the scoring by knocking Paul
Gamsby rebound into a gaping
Huskie net.

NEW YORK (IFP) - The Nation-
al Football League, after a mara-
thon realignment meeting, p u t
two West Coast teams, Los An-
geles and San Francisco, with At-
lanta and New Orleans in a sin-
gle division made from a blind
draw yesterday.
Commissioner Pete Rozelle said
he had decided to use the blind
draw after the owners, who had
been meeting for eight months,
had been unable to reach unan-
imous decision on any one plan.
F i v e different combinations
were placed into a large b o w l.
They were shuffled and one was
drawn by Rozelle's secretary.
The draw left the Midwest
teams, Chicago, Green Bay, De-
troit, and Minnesota cold and un-
happy, since they had campaign-
ed for the addition of a warm-
weather city to their line-up, link-
ed together as they were last sea-
son without relief from what they
have considered their major prob-
lem.
The p 1 a n pulled out of the
flower vase left pro football with
the following alignment beginning
with the 1970 season:
National Conference
East Division - Dallas, N e w
York Giants, Philadelphia, St.
Louis and Washington.

NIGHT EDITOR:
ERIC SIEGEL
Central Division-Chicago, De-
troit, Green Bay and Minnesota.
Western Division - Atlanta,
Los Angeles, New Orleans and San
Francisco.
American Conference
East Division -Baltimore, Bos-
ton, Buffalo, Miami and New York
Jets.
Central Division - Cincinnati,
Cleveland, Houston and Pitts-
burgh.

West Division - Denver, Kan-
sas City, Oakland and San Diego.
Baltimore, Cleveland and Pitts-
burgh moved from the existing 18-
team National Football League to
the 10-team American Football
League on May 10, forming the
two 13-team conferences that Will
form the structure of the sport
{for the 1970's.
The 13 members of the Ameri-
can Conference immediately an-
nounced their division line-up,
but the 13 teams remaining to
form the National Conference
were unable to agree until Rozelle
intervened yesterday morning.
Beginning with the 1970 season,
each team in a five-team division
will meet the other clubs in its
division on a home-and-home ba-
sis; play three of the other eighb
teams in its conference, and cross
into the other conference for an-
other three games

* SCOR ES
' .o . >": :.ir::r:? ?:: v. ' S''i .v'" 5; ', ::?{. . \:::}5. :v: ..w .. ... ....... .. a

NHL
No games scheduled.
NBA
LA 108, Boston 103
New York 104, Detroit 102
Philadelphia 127, San Francisco 106
Atlanta 117, Cincinnati 100
Seattle vs. Chicago, inc.

College Basketball
UCLA 61, Bradley 56
Jacksonville 114, Virgin Islands 66
Presbyterian 69, Wofford 60
Union $1, Morgan State 80
Biscayne 77, Florida Tech 67
St. Peter's 77, Niagra 73
Boston Univ. 92, Vermont 65

Against
The story of
Jack Langer
By ERIC SIEGEL
THE JACK LANGER story is a simple one. It is the story of
an amateur college athlete, a second string center on Yale
r University's basketball team who is not an exceptional player
but who loves to play the game and did Just that this summer
Unhappily, .however, for Langer .but especially fr amateur
college sports in this country, the story does not end there. The
National Collegiate Athletic Association; as it has done so often
in the past, has complicated 'the concept of participation in
amateur sports and prolonged the story of Jack Langer.
The nature of the complication is familiar to anyone who
has witnessed the policies of this collegiate governing board in
the past decade.,
Under NCAA rules, Langer was automatically declared in-,
eligible after he participated in the Maccabiah Games, the
Jewish Olympics, in Israel this summer.
Earlier; with typical disregard for the welfare of the amateur
athletes it supposedly represents,'the NCAA had refused to allow
basketball players to participate in the Gaies, although it
sanctioned the participation of athletes in sports other than
basketball.
THE REASON FOR this apparent incongruity was summed
up by Walter Byers, the executive director of the NCAA, in a
letter sent last July to University of Pennsylvania President
Gaylord Harnwell.
With shades of the high-handed pressure tactics taken by
the NCAA in their with the Amateur Athletic Union in the early
'60's over the "control" of amateur track in this country, Byers
said that in refusing to sanction the basketball competition, the
NCAA had "hoped to persuade" the AAU to give up its fight to
control amateur basketball. The AAU sponsers the U.S. teams.
Langer could well have been a real loser in all this, except
for the understanding and rational position taken by officials at
Yale, a position that contrasts markedly with that taken by the
NCAA.
From the very beginning, Langer had the unqualified sup-
port of the coaches, athletic department officials and university
fficials at his school.
When he was first invited to attend the Games, Langer went
to Delaney Kiphuth, the Eli's athletic director, and asked Kip-
huth what he should do. "Do whatever you want to," Kiphuth
told him, "and we'll back you all the way."
At the same time, Kiphuth told the press, "Everyone says
'Do what the NCAA, the Great White Father, tells you to do!'
We simply don't agree with that."
KIPHUTH KEPT HIS WOIRD, both to the press and to
Langer. When the Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference
(ECAC) ordered Yale to "cease and desist" from playing the
6-8 reserve center, Langer went ahead and played anyway.
And when the NCAA, meeting last week in Washington,
D:C., placed Yale on probation for two years - a step that
means the Ivy League school will not be able to appear in any
NCAA championships or post season tournaments in any sport,
nor appear on television - Henry Chauncey, Jr., a special as-
sistant to the President of Yale, said:
"There is no question that Jack Langer will continue to
play basketball. We don't care what they do - Jack Langer
will play when the coach wants to use him.
Added Chauncey: "It is important to record that Langer
was not penalized in any way."
The adverse reaction to the NCAA decision to place Yale
on probation and declare Langer ineligible has already been
strong. The Presidents of the other seven Ivy League schools
have issued a statement condemning the actions of the NCAA
in regards to the "Langer Case." And the ECAC, attempting to
slap Yale with its own probation, was forced to withdraw the
proposal in the face of heated floor debate.
It appears that the NCAA has finally opened a Pandora's
Box of woes it may not be able to handle. In this context, one
is reminded of the Biblical admonition: "He who troubleth his
own house inherits the wind."

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
MICH. TECH'S Al McLeod breaks away (top); is tripped by
Michel Jarry (middle); and scores on a penalty shot (bottom).

DESPITE POOR TIMES
Tankers dunk Toronto, 84-29

By ROD ROBERTS
When Michigan's s w i m team
literally drowns an opponent by
a score of 84-29, captures ten of
thirteen first places, and sweeps
first and second in eight of the
events, one might expect that the
coach would be pleased.
But Michigan mentor Gus
Stager was anything but happy
after his team humiliated Toronto
last night at Matt Mann Pool.
When asked if he was disappointed
in anyone, he replied "The fresh-
men-like McCarthy, McCullough,
Day,.Kennedy, Whitaker, Dorney.
Tim Norleni and Don Peterson
were the only two that swam de-
cent races all night."
Norlen and Peterson captured
first and second in the 200 yard
butterfly with times of 1:56.4 and
1:57.61 respectively. These two
freshmen were the only Michigan
tankers to warrant Stager's praise
all night.
Originally the Toronto meet was
scheduled by Stager in hopes that
he could find some clues as to

- - ~\.
A D IVE RS ITY OF PPG INDUSTRIES representatives wil
CARE E RS interview at

what swimmers he should use in
next week's showdown against
Southwest power Southern Meth-
odist.
The talent on Toronto's team
was obviously inferior, so the meet,
in effect, amounted to a time trial
for most of Michigan's squad.
Wolverine aces Gary Kinkead,
Juan Bello, Bill Mahoney, a n d
Dick Rydze were not entered in
any event, as Michigan's coach
tested the depth on his squad.
Most of his Wolverines failed. As
Stager commented, "I learned that
my team was lousy tonight."
He continued, "Sure it's hard
to get up for a meet like this
since it isn't a big one. But I
put these guys in to swim a race
and some of them act like they
don't even care."
The events where Stager showed
most of his concern were the dis-
tance freestyle, the backstroke,
and the breaststroke. Freshmen
Rich Dorney won the 1000 yard
freestyle in' 10:26.73, and Mike
Whitaker captured the 200 breast

in 2:23.5. But Coach Stager
thought that both of the times
should have been faster,
"Dorney wasted two seconds
looking up at' the clock when he
turned at the 500, while Whitaker
is a much better breaststroker
than that time of his shows,"
Stager said.-
The 200 yard backstroke brought
Toronto one of its few victories
as Jim Shaw edged out Wolver-
ines Greg Goshorn and Bill Ken-
nedy with a 2:02.95 clocking.
Stager's search for another back-
stroker for next week's meet
against SMU was unsuccessful, as
Stager lamented, "Goshorn does-
n't go out fast enough to swim a
tough race, while Kennedy Just
died at the last turn."
The diving events were easily
captured by Wolverines Chris
Newcomer and John Hamilton in
the low and high boards respec-
tively.
I,

PPG INDUSTRIES (formerly Pittsburgh
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the challenging career opportunities in
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Ready for SMU?

400 YARD MEDLEY RELAY-- Toron-
to (Shaw, Baliantyne, Heatley, Van
Ryn) 3:46.62; Mich. (Peterson, Mumby,
Wainess, Kenehan) 3:46.66.
1000 YARD FREESTYLE = Dorney
(Mich.), 10:26.73; Casey (Mich.), Cess-
ing (Toronto).
200 YARD FREESTYLE - Guiness
Watts (Mich.),D,2,
(Toronto), 1:52.13; Finney (Mich.);
Watts (Mich.); Heatley (Toronto).
50 YARD FREESTYLE - Bob Zann
(Mich.), 22.5; Greg Zann (Mich.), Van
Ryn (Toronto).
200 YARD INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY -
McCullough (Mich.), 2:04.81; H i l l e r
(Mich.); Bryon (Toronto).
THREE METER DIVING - Hamilton
(Mich.), 265.45; Surlano (Mich.); De-
vtt (Toronto), 89.60.
200 YARD BUTTERFLY. -- Norlen
(Mich.), 1:56.54; Peterson (Mich.); Day
(Mich.); Bryon (Toronto).

100 YARD FREESTYSLE -- Sullivan
(Mich.) 51.38; McIntosh (Toronto);
Twohig (Toronto); Katz (Mich.)
200 YARD BACKSTROKE - Shaw
(Toronto), 202.95; Goshorn (Migh.);
Kennedy (Mich.)
500 YARD FREESTYLE - Casey
(Mich.), 5:05.40; Kelley (Mich.); Gui-
ness (Toronto).
200 YARD BREASTSTROKE - Whi-
taker (Mich.), 2:23.52; Hiller (Mich.);
Showerman (Toronto).
400 YARD FREESTYLE RELAY -
Michigan (Gavin, MacDonald, Day,
Watts) 3:23.04; Toronto (Twohig, Gui-
ness, MacIntosh, Van Ryn), 3:25.66.
ONE METER DIVING - Newcomerj
(Mich.)), 2:17.2; McKee (Mich.); Hum-
mell (Toronto).
FINAL SCORE- Michigan, 84; To-
ronto, 29.

W ORSHIP

YPSI LANTI1
This new store carries more trade (non-text) books
than any other in the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area.
Unusual 1970 calendars, thousands of paperbacks,
lots of them used, some hardbacks.
10% OFF
SON ALL BOOKS
Mon.-Thurs.-9-9; Fri.-9-6; Sat.-12:5:30
We think we're interesting-

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-688 1
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-"Sounds of Silence,"
Dr. Hoover Rupert.
6:00 p.m,-Felowship Worship.
6:15 p.m.-Fellowship Supper.
7:00 p.m. - Fellowship Program-"Existen-
tialism."
WEDNESDAY
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grad Dinner.
7:00 p.m.-Wesley Grad Program.
THURSDAY
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion-"The En-
vironment of Man" with Ed McCracken.
FRIDAY
12:00 noon - Luncheon Discussion - "The
Prophets - Dissenters of the Past" with
Bart Beavin.
6:00 p.m.-Board of Trustees Dinner and
Meeting.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1 833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Servies, Sunday School
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a.m.-Testimony Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday..
Public Reading Roam, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Man., 10-9: Tues.-Sat., 10-5, Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Bible Speaks to You," Radio WAAM,
1600, Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 663-7321.

UNIVERSITY ,REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron°
Phone 662-3153
Ministers: Calvin S. Malefvt and Paul Swets
1 0:30 a m.-"Man Against Himself."
5.:30 p.m.-Collegiate Supper.
6:30 p.m.-"Neurotic Sexuality."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.a
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 11:00 a.m.-Services,
Commemorating the 20th anniversary of
the chapel dediacation. Sermon by. the Rev.
Alfred Scheips, "On Leaving the Teens."
(Communion at 11:00).
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Organization, Supper.
Sunday, 6:45 to 8:15 p.m.-Christmas Open
House.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Advent Candle-
light Service, Lessons and Carols, Holy
Communion.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ave.E
Rev. Leonard Verduin
Experiments in Campus Ministry.
Speaking: Russ Palsrok.
Morning Sermon at 10 a.m.-"Chris Is Lord."
Evening, 6 p.m.-Informal evening service.
THE ARK
1421 Hill-761-1451
Ark Experimental Worship at 4:30 p.m. on
Sunday.

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL "
A.L.C.-L.C.A.
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
10:30 aim.-Matins.
6:00 p.m.-Holy Communion.
7:00 p.m.-Supper and Pialogue.
UNITY CENTER OF
PRACTICAL CHRISTIANITY
310 S. State
663-4314
Mrs. Eleonore Krafft, Minister
Sunday Service-11:00 a.m.
Study Class-Mrs. Krafft-7:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Prayer and Counseling-10:00 a.m. Wednes-
day.
Center is Open-Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
11-2; Tuesday, 3-6 p.m. .
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Phene 662-4466
rinisters: Robert Sanders, John R. Waser,
Harold S. Horan
Worship at 9.:00 and 10:30 am.-Preaching
Jan. 18: Mr. Sanders.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH.
9:45 a.m.-U Fellowship Bible Discussion.
11:00 a.m.-"Obliged, Eager and Unashamed
to Share!"
7:00 p.m.-Building Comm. Report and Paul
Johnson, contractor.
8:30 p.m.-Campus and Careers Fellowship.
Transportation available 9:30 a.m. Sundays at
the Ann Arbor "Y" or through 76.1-6749.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Terry N._Smith, Minister

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone665-6149

--- 'L

We hope you will.

1I11

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II

CT AIDAIU'S PISCt' PfLDAI ~IJIDEC

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