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April 18, 1970 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-18

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page three

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NEWS PHONE: 764-055
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0

Students International
announces a new summer flight:
AUGUST 3 to AUGUST 26
Detroit - London - Detroit ...... $239
phone or stop in:
Students International
1231 S. University
769-6871

Saturday, April 18, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

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the
news today
by T he Associated Press and College Press Service

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JUDGE HARRY A. BLACKMUN yesterday said he told the
White House about his minor stock ties in three court rulings
before he was named to fill the empty seat on the Supreme Court.
I specifically brought these up myself," he said. "It is only fair. I
think the Senate committee should be aware of them."
Blackmun said he took part in three decisions by the U.S. 8th Court
of Appeals between 1960 and 1967 involving firms in which he held
stock.
* * *
CAMBODIAN SOLDIERS opened fire on a detention camp
in the Southern city of Takeo yesterday and slaughtered mores
than 100 Vietnamese.
Survivors of the incident told Western correspondents that Cam-
odians entered the camp four times between Thursday night and
yesterday morning and fired without warning.
This was the second reported massacre of Vietnamese living in
detention camps in Cambodia. Last week, at least 73 Vietnamese
civilians were killed in a detention camp at .Prasant in eastern Cam-
bodia.

Acti1on stymied
inEMU strike
My MARION SELZ
While support mounts for the strike at Eastern Michigan
University, a stalemate has been reached between the stu-
dents and the administration.
Students claim t h a t Student Senate President Tom
Moors was denied a requisition for $50 worth of mimeo paper
in a move by the administration to strangle the strike.
Curtis Stadtfeld, director of Information Services, de-
nies this, attributing the block to procedural delay. However,
students involved in the strike say that without the paper
necessary for disseminating information, the strike is effec-
tively smothered.
Prior to this, the strike had been gaining support as both
sides played a waiting game.}- -

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MORE THAN 1000 COLLEGES and 400 high schools will
be participating in Earth Day, the Environmental Teach-In,Y
on April 22, the Teach-In organizers estimated.
Coordinated by a 12-man staff and financed through con-
tributions and foundation grants, the teach-in has created interest EMU strikers sna
in ecology action this month in every state. Rallies, lectures, protests, ----a
and demonstrations of life style alternatives to the continuous IB A AN L S :
degradation of the environment are scheduled in a program similar Bitisoh fhLYnMr:u
in tactics to that of the Vietnam Moratorium.
The University held its environmental teach-in, sponsored by
ENACT, March 10-14 because the date of the nation-wide teach-ins P a el vie
corresponds with University exams. Ti

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
ake-dance on campus

ws future

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The perils of a man
who comes face-to-face with himself...

THE UNITED STATES reluctantly acceded to Jordan's
ouster of the American ambassador there yesterday but sought to
hold down the damage to U.S.-Jordanian.relations.
Official sources in Amman said Foreign Minister Abdel Moneim
Rifai had called for the removal of Ambassador Harrison M. Symmes
on grounds that the envoy had advised U.S. Asst. Secretary of State
Joseph J. Sisco to cancel his scheduled visit to Jordan.
As seen by Washington sources, the Amman action was more
of a domestic political maneuver than a foreign policy move against
the United States.
* - * *
FEDERAL POWER COMMISSION officials have told Con-
gress that electric power interruptions and brownouts likely will
continue and may increase in 1970 and 1971, it was reported yes-
terday.
John N. Nassikas, commission chairman, commented on the power
shortage prospects in testimony before a House appropriations sub-
committee.
Nassikas emphasized that the commission doesn't have the
authority to compel any utility company to increase its zenerating
plant capacity, that this is a matter for the utility concerns themselves.

of post-strike 'U'

' By LYNN WEINER
"We accept the challenge of
challenging the intellectual values
of this institution," said author
and visiting history lecturer Har-
old Cruse Thursday during t h.e
final session of the Black Action
Movement (BAM's) week-long
strike analysis program.
Cruse spoke as a member of a
panel which discussed the recent
BAM strike and its implications
for the future. The panel also in-
cluded political science Prof.
Archie Singham, anthropology
Prof. Gloria Marshall, and BAM
spokesman Ron Thompson.
Cruse related the BAM actions
to the content of black studies!
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BERKELEY, Calif. (P) - Police
using tear gas quickly scattered
student demonstrators at a for-
bidden antiwar rally despite
showers of rocks yesterday in the
third straight day of e"' ders at
the University of Cale ,rnia.
A forbidden lunchti- .e rally at
Sproul Plaza dissolvd, as a po-
lice loudspeaker ordered dispersal
under threat of arrest.
About 300 youths then gathered
around one demonstrator waving
a red flag. Police and sheriff's,
deputies afoot and in cars herd-
ed them gradually three to five
blocks south of the campus.
Amid scattered showers of rocks,
police repeatedly discharged -tear
gas, as the screaming demonstra-
tors fled in small bands.
Seven arrests were made, and
one officer suffered a cut right
hand when a rock broke a tear
gas container in his vest. There
had been 39 arrests Thursday
and 27 Wednesday in clashes be-
tween students and police.
In contrast with Wednesday
and Thursday, when relatively few
police were on duty, several hund-

red officers from Oakland, Berke-
ley and the sheriff's department
were on the campus Friday.
San Francisco police were on a
stand-by alert for mutual aid if
needed.
The university had placed the
radical Students for a Democratic
Society chapter under interim sus-
pension Thursday, forbidding the
group use ofcampus facilities. A
state of emergency order tbanned
all rallies and meetings.
In Southern California, the
area around the university campus
at Santa Barbara was quiet. About
700 young people Thursday night
smashed windows at a Bank of
America branch before about 200
officers dispersed them.
Four young people - at least
one of them a student - were hit
by police shotgun pellets during
the confrontation. Police officers
launched several dozen tear gas
canisters to disperse the demon-
strators who also smashed nearby
real estate office windows and set
some trash bins ablaze in the
street.

courses. "Black studies must ex-
pand beyond the 'narrow con-
cerns' of the black group, in order
to deal with the historical impact
of the black experience on Amer-
ican development as a whole," he
said. "We must enlighten, but also
equip, black students to deal with
the broader issues of, for example,
this university as an institution."~
"We are faced with the problem
of revising history related to the
world," he added. "We should ap-
proach the. development of black
studies realizing this problem of
new interpretations."
Cruse also discussed the role of
the mass communications during
the BAM strike. "That the whites
had access to the media, and the
blacks didn't, reflects the disad-
vantages of the lack of stake in
mass communications," he said.
"The black experience has been
outside the range of the mass
communications networks," he
added. "The probleih become more
acute as the media become more
technically sophisticated."
Speaking on the future role of
black faculty at the University,
Mrs. Marshall said, "We are con-
cerned with course content.
"We must have courses focus-
ing on achievements of blacks,"
she continued. She also said the
position of black staff at the Uni-
versity must be examined.
Mrs. Marshall then spoke on
the involvement of BAM in the
total struggle for liberation faced
by blacks and other peoples. "We
should see a greater degree of co-
operation between BAM, African
students, and third-world stu-
dents," she said. "We have a com-
mon struggle, and must make a
concerned effort to demolish bar-
riers set up to divide us."
Singham views the BAM move-
ment as one which "brought to-
gether all the black campus
groups." Together, he said, these'
groups destroyed "the fundament-
al preconception among white in-
tellectuals that black intellectuals
are incapable of developing a co-
herant strategy without the help'
of those who have paternalistic
conception of what blacks are."

The Black, Student Associa-
tion has pledged its support
for the strike, although. the
form this support will take is
yet to be determined.
The campus r a d i o station,
WHUR, announced that it would
broadcast all news of the strike's
progress. The sociology depart-
ment's graduate program has an-
nounced its support, and ten to
twenty professors have cancelled
their classes for the strike's dura-
tion.
Meanwhile, each side ishwaiting
for the other to make the first
move.
Paul Mazmanian, a spokesman
for the Student Liberation Move-
ment (SLAM) which is leading the
strike, he said, "We feel that it is
time for the Regents to recognize
the students as individuals. There
is presently a dean of students,
whorshould serve as a liaison be-
tween the administration and the
student body. When the adminis-
tration tells him they are ready
to speak to us, we'll be ready to
speak to them.,
Speaking for the administration,
Stadtfeld said they were willing to
discuss matters, but they were un-
clear as to who or what they were
negotiating about. "We're willing
to negotiate, but we don't know
who the leaders of SLAM are," he
said. "The president thinks, as I
do, that we don't yet fully know
what's going on. It seems that
there's a new list of demands al-
most everyday."
In response the administration's
uncertainty concerning SLAM's
leadership, Marzmanian s a i d,
"This is a movement of the peo-
ple."
The strike was precipitated by
the firing of six professors, and
the following demands were cir-
culated:
-the six fired professors are
to be rehired,
-there is to be a student voice
in decision making, including the
hiring and firing of faculty,
-the Regents' meetings are to
be open,
-there is to be a non-voting
student on the Board of Regents.
According to Arthur Ellis, sec-
retary for the Regents, "The fired
faculty members don't want stu-
dents to settle ' their problems.
They want to exhaust the regular
procedures."
David Cahill, an assistant pro-
fessor of political science, dis-
agreed. "To my knowledge, all of
the professors support the strike.
Roger Staples, an English in -
structor and one, of those dismis-
sed, concurred with Cahill. "Stu-
dents should run the university,"
he said, "student participation is
long over due."
Both sides have committed
themselves to non-violent tactics,
and Statfeld said, "Peaceful pick-
eting will be allowed to continue,
as long as no one is forcibly pre-
vented from entering a ftilding."

Charg
two with
disruption
By RON RULOFF
Two more students have
been charged with disrupting
a class during the Black Ac-
tion Movement (BAM) strike
bringing the number of stu-
dents charged to 15.
The students, Michael Vernarel-
li, '70and Michael Gordon, were
charged by German Prof. Roy
Cowen Jr. with entering his Ger-
man 434 class on March-27 and
making "it impossible to continue
the class because of beating .on
chairs and shouting."
According to Cowen, Vernarelli,
Gordon and three other BAM sup-
porters who have not been iden-
tified, refused his request to leave
when they first entered. They then
engaged the class in a dialogue
concerning the BAM demands.
"There was a good talk going
for a while," said Vernarelli, but,
he added, the class seemed gen-
erally apathetic to the strikers'
arguments:Vernarelli then said he
began banging on a desk to pre-
vent the class from continuing.
It was at this point that Cowen
attempted to conduct class. But
again the disruption continued.
Vernarelli and Cowen say the dis-
ruptions continued until 4 p.m.,
an hour after class began. The
class contiiued until 4:30 p.m. as
usual.
Vernarelli says he was notified
of the charge in a letter post-.
marked April 14, which he re-
ceived on April 15. "The letter it-
self was dated the 10th. I think
the charges-might have been filed
after the deadline on the 8th,"
he claims. April 8 was the final
date that charges couldtbe filed
against disrupters.
Vernarelli said that "if they
(the charges) are properly filed,
I probably will go before the
(LSA)bAdministrative Board."
President Roben Fleming has of-
fered accused persons an oppor-
tunity to have their cases heard
before a special panel of hearing
examiners, chosen by Fleming and
informally agreed upon by BAM.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard- St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day thrcugh Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

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- April 28, 1970

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