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April 17, 1970 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-17

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Pace Seven

Friday, April 17, 197

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

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BURSLEY, SMIT MAKE PROPOSAL

i

MARRIAGE

Legislators ask state aid on minority admissions

I

by Gogol

(IN RUSSIAN)

A Russian Comedy Presented by Members of
the Department of Slavic Languages and Litera-
ture and the Russian Circle
5.
Friday 17 Apl8:0O P.M.
SCHORLING AUDITORIUM
(Education School)
ADMISSION FREE (Donation Requested)
a

By LARRY LEMPERT
Two Ann Arbor legislators
have called for "prompt state
leadership" to deal with t h e
problem of minority enrollment
that was the central issue in
the Black Action Movement
strike.
In a letter to Gov. William
G. Milliken last week, Sen. Gil-
bert E. Bursley and.Rep. Ray-
mond J. Smit warned that the
recent disordei at the University
could spread to other campuses
if the enrollment of minority
students at state institutions
of higher education was not seen
"as a total state problem."
The two Ann Arbor Republi-
cans recommended that a com-
mittee be formed to study all
of the problems of higher edu-
cation and that Milliken in-

lude action on these prob-
lems in his plans for state-wide
educational reform.
"The question of minority
representation in a student
body is a much broader issue
than should have to be faced
-by any one university or suc-
cessive and singly by each of
them." Bursley and Smit said.
"The question involves the
total needs of the state, the per-
centage of state population to
be found in various minority
groups and the urgent need for
the education of emerging leaO-
ership among all segments of
our population," they contin-
ued.
The legislators argued that
the State Board of Education
should have played a greater
role in the issues of minority
enrollment.
"The failure of the State
Board of Education to con-
sider, investigate and recom-
TEACHERS WANTED
SOUTHWEST, ENTIRE WEST
AND ALASKA
Southwest Teachers Aqency
1303 Central Ave., N.E.
Albuquerque, N.M. 87106
Free Reoistrotion

mend on these issues together
with attendant fiscal impli-
cations has left a serious va-
cuum in which student discon-
tent has reached the boiling
point," said Bursley and Smit.
"This month it was The Uni-
versity of Michigan," they said.
"It may be assumed that minor-
ities at other institutions may
be similarly motivated for de-
mands for change. Our respon-
sibility is to envisage this as a
total state problem and to treat
it in that light."
Bursley and Smit recom-
mended to Milliken that a "high
level blue ribbon committee"
be activated "to conduct hear-
ings and make recommendations
upon all -of the problems of
higher education."
"Suggested goals for various
institutions may be offered and
the financing requisite to see
that these are attained should
be recommended," they said.
The legislators added that
the preparation of high school
students for admission to col-
lege is a major part of our

problem." They recommended
that adjustments be made in
Milliken's proposed reform pro-
gram for pre-college education
to achieve that preparation.
Contacted this week. Sen.
Bursley elaborated on his let-
ter to Milliken.
"Education reform must be
from kindergarten to graduate
school, because the problems
are all interrelated," Bursley
said.
He added that the problems
are "too much for the present
Board of Education to handle."
Presently, the state board deals
with education on all levels.
Charging that the board's
handling of higher education is
inadequate, Bursley advocated
the establishment of a state
higher education coordinating
board, in addition to the pre-
sent board, to concentrate on
the problems of education at
the higher levels. The concerns
of the two boards would have
to be carefully delineated, and
there would have to be good

communication between them,
Bursley said.
As a first step Bursley is sug-
gesting to Milliken the estab-
lishment of the committee.
"with representatives from the
various state schools and per-
haps from the general public"
as well as legislators, to invest-
igate the problems and to make
recommendations.
He said he hopes the com-
mittee would recommend some-
thing like a separate higher lev-
"I think the legislature would
"I think the legitlature would
be receptive to the concept,
if it is explained that the pre-
sent board isn't doing the job,",
Bursley asserted.
He added that the legislature
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin.is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Mitchigan. Notices should he
sent in TYP Wb BTTE N f o rmto
Rdom 3528 L. S. A B 1 d g ., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear onye only. Student organiza-
tion notices a r e not accepted for
p u'"cation. F o r more informa-
tion, phone 764-9270.

is now working on the problem
of improving the preparation of
high school students for col-
lege.
"We recognize the fact that
you have to turn them out of
high school well-qualified. You
can't blame the universit;
alone," he said.
University Vice President for
State Relations and Planning
Arthur Ross said earlier this
week that University officials
support the establishment of a
"higher education coordinating
board,"
"We think it's a better plan
to have a separate board ad-
dressing itself to the problems
of higher education," Ross said.
FRIDAY, APRIL 17
Day Calendar
Astronomy Colloq.: D. Marks, "Theory
of Rotating Stars", P&A Cofloq. Em.,
':00 p.rn
Degree Recital: Janet Nepkle, cello,
Sch. of Music Recital Hall, 5:00 p.m.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society: "Pi-
rates of Penzance." Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater, 7:00 and 10:00 p.m.
DMA Piano Series: J. Bauder, R.
Brooks, A. Kindt, E. Zajac, pianists,
Sch, of Music Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
(Continued on page 11)

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AFTER FINALS
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
MONDAY, APRIL 20
Room 3X Union
7:30 P.M.

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TUESDAY, APRIL 21-3:00 P.M. {f
MICHIGAN LEAGUE BALLROOM
ADMISSION FREE
THE YOGI WILL ALSO BE IN DETROIT MONDAY, APRIL 20,.
1:00 P.M., AT RACKHAM AUDITORIUM, WOODWARD AND
FARNSWORTH (Near Detroit Inst. of Arts)
SPONSORED BY OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS
2282 SAB 764-7442 :
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NEW YORK-LONDON
$1I89
June 14 to July 22
phone or stop in
STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL
1231 S. University
769-6871

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SCIIRCILE BOOKS
Zen, Yoga, Tarot
Alchemy. Astrology, Theosophy
Tarot, Magic, Parapsychology
Macrobiotics and Health Food Books
215 S. STATE ... 2nd Floor
10 A.M 8:30 P.M 769-1583
~~'O~Oc.~ Cr

I

FREE UNIVERSITY

--- -"

If you have Used Books
ST S to SelRead This!
As the Semester end approaches-bringing with it a period of heavy book selling by students-ULRICH'S
would like to review with you their BOOK BUY-BACK POLICY.
Used books fall into several categories, each of which-because of the law of supply and demand-has
its own price tag. Let's explore these various categories for your guidance.
CLASS I.
A textbook of current copyright - used on our campus - and which the Teaching Department involved
has approved for re-use next semester-has the highest market value. If ULRICH'S needs copies of this book
we will offer a minimum of 50% of the list price for copies in good physical condition. When we have sufficient
stock of a title for the coming semester, ULRICH'S will offer a "WHOLESALE PRICE" which will be explained
later in this article. (THIS IS ONE REASON FOR SELLING ALL YOUR USED BOOKS AT ONCE.)
CLASS II.
Some of the above Class I books will be offered which have torn bindings, loose pages or other physical
defects. These will be priced down according to the estimated cost of repair.
CLASS 111.
Each semester various professors decide to change texts for a given course. These decisions on change of
textbooks are made in echelons of THINKING AND AUTHORITY far above the level of your local book retailers,
AND ULRICH'S HAS NO PART IN THE DECISION. (QUITE OFTEN WE HAVE MANY COPIES OF THE OLD
TITLE OF WHICH YOU HAVE ONLY ONE.)
However, ULRICH'S DO enter the picture by having connections with over 600 other bookstores through-
out the country. We advertise these discontinued books and sell many of them at schools where they are still
being used. ULRICH'S do this as a service to you and pay you the BEST POSSIBLE price when you sell them to us
with your currently used books.
CLASS IV.
Authors and nublishers freauentIv bring out new editions. When we "aet cauaht" with an old edition. let's

CRAFT FAIR
ON THE DIAG
Sat., April 18th--10-7
Thousands of exciting things to buy-Music
by the UP 12-1.
To sell or display just bring your own blanket
or table.
Giant Rumage give away - bring your old,.
clothes to trade or give away.
QUESTIONS? CALL 763-2130

MmmUSKET

All Campus Musical Theatre Co.

I

Opens Applications for

MUSIC DIRECTOR

CHOREOGRAPH ER

Pick up petitions UAC office, 2nd floor Union

I

DUE APRIL 17, 5:00 P.M.

i\ 1 ,.f

11

This

Weekend ..Why No t?

)lZzarea

' ''

50c 50c
This coupon good for
50c off
1 on any MEDIUM or LARGE Pizza
at LITTLE CAESARS
S50c~ Coupon expires April 29, 1970 5 4
-50c

4w

1751

U!

\1{

Plymouth Rd.

.- ., /dSAVE MORE! );,',P)J

A u 7 U'l , l-'I a u T N't

.,

Phone:
,l# ,..,.,

65c This coupon good for 65c

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