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April 15, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-15

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, April 15, 1970

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, April 15, 1970

i

cinema=

music

t

Loving
By DONALD KUBIT.
Occasionally an X-rated
movie comes along that isn't
half-bad, (which also means
it isn't half good). All the Lov-
ing Couples, now showing at
the Fifth. Forum, is such a
film. There is no doubt that
it is what many classify as a
"sex exploitation movie" -
drawing crowds because of its
immoralistic content. However,
it contains enough of a s t o r y
spiced with a ribald humor that
makes it entertaining, and
even, with a stretch of the
imagination, enjoyable.
All the Loving Couples deals
with wife swapping at its All
American best; proposing that
such a practice is the only mo-
dern way to save a ,marriage.
Three couples spend F r i d a y
nights exchanging mates for a
few hours in the sack. T h e y
invite another couple to join
their illustrious -group.
The motley crew consists of
an impotent Bircher who gives
periodic lectures on hippies
with dirty feet, a mild man-
nered Jew who w i n s at
arm wrestling, an ex-
show girl and a dumb blond.
The point is stressed that these
are not perverts, but just "good
old American folks" out for
sorme good, old, healthy sex.
The complication that arises
is that the original six are bed
hopeing for kicks, where the
young husband of the new cou-
ple, an ambitious insurance

an

X'

rating? Creativity lurks in hidden corners at Hill

" RV Inv p L'TR.RnVL

salesman, considers the exper-
ience mandatory for furthering
his business interests. As t h e
night progresses the phony is
sniffed out and condemned for
his barbaric attitude.
The party is warmed up with
the showing of a stage film,
just to get everyone in t h e
mood. And in the fashion of
/ Putney Swope a set of parody
commercials on-such products
as "Pit Stop" deoderant and
"White Power" laundry deter-
gent tie in with the action of
the movie and are filled with
phallic symbols and sexual
connotations - a cigarette is
advertised with the slogan "it's
not how hard you make it, it's
how you make it hard."
One often thinks that an
X-rating is synonymous with
a preponderance of nudity, but
this is not the case of All the
Loving Couples. Its rating is
more for what it suggests than
what it actually exhibits. Of
course, there is the bare ass
and exposed tit, but thank God
we are spared the torture of
sitting through the passionate
groans and sweat producing
sighs,
The odd thing is that you
actually find yourself sympa-
thizing with these people and
their problem. The bad guy is
the get ahead insurance sales-
man, not the already success-
ful businessman. Even if you
don't agree with the theory,

you have to admit the philoso-
phy is pretty interesting.
"Sex makes the world go
round" and sex makes All the
Loving Couples an orgy that
indeed is "just another name
for group therapy." A good
deal of the humor is worn, right
out of old vaudeville skits, but
nonetheless you laugh because
it is very funny.
I've always had a fondness
for these bedroom abortions,
because you can see them
drunk or stoned and leave the
theater knowing that you did-
n't miss anything. If you have
any mind at all you can guess
the plot in the first five min-
utes and spend the rest of the
time beating the actors to their
all too obvious lines, thus laugh-
ing at the film rather than with
it.
However, I think I may have
been on target during All the
Loving Couples. I chuckled on
cue when the producers in-
tended. There is enough in this
film that even though it will
never be nominated for an
Academy Award, it is fun if you
can see it as just good old
American sex and for all you
X-rated movie fans it's a
scream. It' won't tell you how
to become President or make
you more socially aware of
the troubles in the world, but
if you accept it for what it is,
which I agree isn't a whole lot,
it's cute, not too boring, and a
good way to. warm up for
finals.

isy d A nnI
Last of two parts
New developments in compo-
sition might call for major
changes in the present equip-
ment. It is possible to describe
all electronic sound in mathe-
matical notation - the wave
forms, the types of sound are
mathematical f u n c t i o n s. As
composers become more and
more familiar with t h i s new
system of notation, the process
of manual composition may be-
come obsolete. A composer
might have a clear conception
of the sound produced by his
notation without any reference
to equipment. If so, a computer,
wired to sound generators, could
assume the task of transcrip-
tions. ,If fed the proper infor-
mation - including duration
and volume levels, the computer
could "perform" this notation
on tape - with no blundering
human to interfere in its pre-
cision. This is not quite as im-
personal as it seems. The com-
poser would be separate from
the process of making music,
but how many composers have
ever had a symphonic orchestra
test their ideas before comple-
tion? Although the present ex-
perimentation might be unnec-
essary, the conception - the
original notation - is still a
personal form of expression.
The School of Music's Studio
is moving toward the new com-
positional practice and modify-
ing equipment. with this new
direction in mind. While minor
changes will be made for con-
venience, all changes will be di-
rected toward computerization.
In this way, no equipment will
have to be replaced, and if a
grant from the University per-
mits expansion, it may be done
immediately. Grants are always
a problem, and the current Uni-
versity cut-backs do not remedy
the situation. National grants
are difficult to obtain. In most'
cases there has to be some gim-
mick: as the first studio in this
country for electronic sound,
Columbia - Princeton has one
type of novelty. It is unfortun-
ate the enthusiasm of electronic
creators at t h i s University
might be restricted through lack
of funds. The University, which
has established the electronic
studio through t h e Rackham
School for Graduate Studies, is
interested in these areas and

will avoid this restriction if the
budget permits.
George Wilson has further
plans for the studio, not all di-
rected toward audio art. At the
present time, courses in elec-
tronic music are not offered to
students outside t h e Music
School, but Wilson, in opening
requirements and welcoming
students of other arts, is trying
to bridge the gap which exists
between the disciplines. Com-
posers are working with faculty
and students of the art school
to present projects in mixed me-
dia, and hopefully an auditor-
ium will be designed specifically
for mixed media.
There are always problems in
a successful mixed media or en-
vironmental work. The main
difficulty is one of coordination
- integrating the audio expres-
sion with the visual experience.
Many times there is no attempt
at this type of inter-art expres-
sion: sounds or visual effects
are considered accompaniment
to the main medium. This, of
course, defeats the purpose of
mixed media - the possibility
for combined expression t h a t
exists in time as a total work.
One major difficulty in this
new a r t form is cooperation
among specialists. It is not
enough to have artists working
together: each mind must be
in the same place if what were
once separate art forms are to
combine and state the s a m e
idea.
Faculty' of b o t h the music
and art schools, working with
these problems, have found
ways to include not only the
separate disciplines, but actions
of the audience as well. The re-.
c e n t mixed media exhibit at
Cranbrook, a school outside De-
troit, was- a total participation:
photoelectric cells, stationed at
the entrance and exit, w e r e
triggered by the motion of ob-
servers through the display.
These, in turn, operated t h e
tapes which w e r e to control
both the sound and light ef-
fects. The audience was part of
the creation.
Just as amazing is the tech-
nology which has permitted
these new forms. Light projec-
tion may be linked with sound
harmonics. The changing visual
pattern will represent, and not
merely illustrate, a type of
sound. Unlike a color organ,
which indicates a change of in-
tensity, the new equipment will

be a visual description of sound.
Mixed media is not so new
that variables a r e left to
chance. Practically everything,
down to the minutest detail,
may be planned in advance. If
discrepancies in equipment are
taken into account, there is vir-
tually no reason for any sur-
prise event. A composition for
light and sound, then, may re-
main constant from perform-
ance to performance. If a mix-
ed media work is to be sub-
jective, if it is intended as com-
munication between a group of
artists and the audience, this
must be the case. This is, of
course, quite separate from ob-
jective art - art which pro-
vides random happenings and
leaves all interpretation to the
observer.
One element that does not re-
main constant is audience re-
sponse. No one would ever wish
to program this variable, but
ocassionally audiences become
violent. A performance last year
of Luciano Berio's Visage found
an audience clawing at plastic
balloons which had fallen from
the stage. Similar balloons were
subject to rough treatment at
an outdoor media display on
North Campus. This time, ob-
servers on hands and knees en-
tered the air-inflated balloons
and proceeded to ward a rath-
er steep incline. Perhaps we will
never know what turns a docile
audience into earth-bound lem-
mings. This extreme reaction
might be surprise - technology
is usually seen as foreign to
personal expression.
Just as in the medium of elec-
tronic sound improvisation, me-
chanical "tinkering" with a con-
cept, may create a positive,
though unintentional, result.
There is still a certain amount
of flexibility, but if an ana-
logy is to be made between elec-
tronic sound and the combined
media, it won't be long before a
computer, fed a particular pro-
gram, will create a media sit-
uation for us. Perhaps each one
of us will have one of these in

our home. Imagine waking one
morning to find an electronic
alarm clock presenting an ex-
pense-paid vacation in the Ba-
hamas. By that time, you will
also need a surfboard.
The Rackham Symphony
Choir, accompanied by the De-
troit Symphony Orchestra; will
perform the Verdi Requiem in
honor of the Choir's twentieth
anniversity.
The performance will take
place on Sunday, April 26, 1970,
at 3:30 p.m. in the Ford Audi-
torium (Jefferson at W o o d-
ward).
Soloists for the single perform-
ance will be Janice Harsanyi, so-
prano; Rosemary Russell, con-
tralto; Waldie Anderson, tenor;
and Willis Patterson, bass. May-
nard Klein, the director of the
Rackham Choir, will conduct
both orchestra and choir in the
performance.
Tickets are available at t h e
Ford Auditorium Box Office,
EIudsons, Grinnells and 4n the
Rackham Educational Membrial
Building (Woodward at Farns-
worth). Prices are $3 and $2.25.
Tickets will also be available at
the door the afternoon of the
performance.
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State commission member asks
increased Indian enrollment aid

HARRY
TUFT
founder and
proprietor of the
Denver Folklore
Center
author of The
Catalogue and
Almanac of
Folk Music
and a fine
performer of
many styles of
folk music

4

(Continued from Page 1)
. However, he said he did not
,anticipate the hiring of any re-
ruiters concerned specifically with
the enrollment of Indian students.
"We provide school, staff, but
they have to decide to come,"
Spurr said. "We are quite willing
to look for Indian academic and
non-academic staff," he added.
. Meanwhile, a new group has
been established on campus whose
.aim is to promote the self-ad-
vancement of American Indians.
The organization's membership
now numbers 20.
Robert Church, a resident at
University, Hospital and acting
chairman of the as-yet-unnamed
group, says the problem which the
organization is dealing with "is
not one of acceptance, but rather
of motivation, that is, getting the
Indian people to want to do some-
thing for themselves."
As set forth in a proposed con-I
stitution, the goals for the group
are:,-
--The advancement of American
Indians "economically, socially,
and culturally through education";
-The dissemination of infor-
mation to the public "for the pur-
pose of dispelling the erroneous
image- of American Indians cre-
ated and fostered by movies and
television."
-The promotion of fellowship
among American Indians.
The number of Indian students
currently attending the University
is unclear because the University
does not require students to spe-
cify their ethnic background when
registering.
However, in a census of students
taken last -year, 46 reported them-
selves as being American Indians,,
according to William Cash, coor- I
dinator of human relations pro-
grams at the University.-
Commissioner Winchester esti-
mates that the Indian population
of the state is between 18,000 and
20,000.
Winchester relates his current
appeal for increased enrollment of
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American Indian students to the
recent dispute over black enroll-
mnent at the University.
"The Black Action Movement
(BAM) has made the University
aware that it is not adequately
educating the black minority of
this state," he says. "But during
the entire BAM confrontation, the
Michigan Indian was not mention-
Church says that the problem
faced by American Indians in-
volves a lack of pride in them-
selves.
"On the reservations, sub-stand-
ard living conditions exist, and no
one is proud to be an Indian," he
maintains. "When people leave the
reservations, they try to become
anonymous, to hide the fact of
their Indian origins. We want In-
dians to integrate into society,
but also to maintain their sense
of self-awareness as Indians"
Church adds.
AMERICAN FILM STUDIES
THE BARKLEYS
OF BROADWAY
dir. CHARLES WALTERS (1949
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Church's organization is still
too new for definite plans to be
worked out, he says, adding that
"we intend to inform the Indian
people that there are sources of
financial aid and counseling serv-
ices available. As soon as we get
>rganized we hope to be recog-
nized by Student Government
Council and the state of Michigan.
Asked to describe his group's
position on using violence to
achieve its goals, Church says, "I
don't think we need to put on our
warpaint. The white man has
taken over the monopoly on that."
I- -_______ - -- - -

Summer Session at
mStanf Ord University
JUNE 22 -AUGUST 15, 1970
FOR FULL DETAILS, WRITE:
OFFICE OF THE SUMMER SESSION
STANFORD UNIVERSITYA
STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 04305

31 N. Washington
YPSILANTI
DIAL 483-3534
STARTS
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Tells it like it's never been
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Rated
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The Truth and Soul Movie)

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Eastern Michigan University
PRESENTS
ASSOCIATION

r t
M

FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 1970
8:30 P.M.
Bowen Fieldhouse, E.M.U., Ypsilanti, Mich.
TICKETS: $3.00, $4.00, $5.00
Advance Tickets Available: E.M.U. McKenny Union, W.S.U.
Center Bldg., J.L. Hudson Co.
Mail Order: Send check or money order payable to E.M.U., Uni-
versity Activities Board, McKenny Union, Ypsilanti, Mich.

si
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W4LX is,
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3HO MICHIGAN
HEALTHY-HAPPY-HOLY ORGANIZATION
GET HIGH 'NATURALLY'-
THROUGH THE USE OF BREATH
YOGI BHAJAN
Master of Kundalini Yoga, the Yoga of
Awareness, Will Share His Knowledge in
a Lecture and Practical Demonstration
SUNDAY, APRIL 19-7:30 P.M.

'4
*

' I

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