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April 12, 1970 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-12

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NOW FOX VILLGE
SHOWING 375 No.MAPLE RD.-7694300

TIMES
Mon.-Fri.
7:10-9:30

pag~~e three

C14C

Mt id Cau

DullMmmm

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

'M A' His what sa-Sun.
the new freedom 1:3
5:10-7:20
of the screen 9:3
is all about-"
-Richard Schickel, Life
An Ingo Preminger Production
Color by DE LUXE*
Panavision* .
CHANGE THE ED SCHOOL
A PP L Y NOAug.W!0

Sunday, April 12, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

the
neWS today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

3RD LANDING MISSION

Apollo

13

heads toward moon

Openings for
students on
Committees:

grad, undergrad, and LS&A
Ed School Administrative

UNDERGRADUATE COMMITTEE
GRADUATE COMMITTEE
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
RESEARCH COMMITTEE
APPLICATIONS & INFO AVAILABLE IN RM. 2011
ED SCHOOL. Deadline for applications has been ex-
tended to April 13 due to the fact that the Ed School
chose to shut down and support BAM during the
strike.

PRESIDENT NIXON gave final instructions yesterday to de-
parting U.S. disarmament negotiators.
Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler gave no hint of the nature of
Nixon's discussion with the six-man delegation, and said only that
"the delegation is going to Vienna with a constructive attitude."'
The group will represent the U.S. at the Strategic Arms Limita-
tion Talks with Russia which began this Thursday in Vienna. The
talks are viewed by many as potentially the most important disarma-
ment negotiations of the nuclear age thus far.
The Senate has passed a resolution calling on Nixon to propose
an immediate mutual freeze on deployment of offensive and defensive
weapons. His disarmament advisory committee is reported to have
favored working toward a general strategic arms freeze, without re-
commending that this be proposed at the outset at Vienna.
Meanwhile both of the great powers are continuing to go ahead
with new missile programs. The United States intends to start de-
ploying MIRVs - Multiple Independently Targetable Re-entry Vehi-
cles - in June. The Soviets are conducting many missile tests and are
deploying more huge SS9 rockets.
SENATORS JOHN COOPER, and Frank Church announced
they will try to have the Laos-Thailand ban against the presence
of U.S. troops extended to Cambodia.
Church (D-Idaho), and Cooper, (R-Conn.) introduced the ap-
proved amendment to last years defense appropriations act which
prohibits the presence of troops in Laos and Thailand. They said
they will introduce a similar amendment to the appropriate military
bill this year for Cambodia.
Church said reports, documented by photographs, have been made
that indicate armed American military personnel have already cross-
ed into Cambodian territory several times in recent days.
Church said the amendment continues Congress's effort to re-
assert its constitutional role in the formulation of foreign policy.
THE U.S. COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS heavily criti-
cized President Nixon's school desegregation policy statement
yesterday.
The commission contended that the statement stirred emotions
and might signal "a major departure from the policy of moving
toward integrated schools" in its extensive critique of the President's
March 24 policy message.
The criticisms extended to all of Nixon's major positions, and
were especially strong on Nixon's distinction between legal and resi-
dential segregation, his support for the neighborhood-school concept
and his opposition to busing pupils to achieve integration.
A CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION of the alleged massa-
cre of South Vietnamese civilians at My Lai will begin Wednes-
day.
Rep. F. Edward Hebert, D-La., chairman of a House Armed
Services subcommittee established to conduct the inquiry, said Satur-
day all sessions would be closed and not even photographs of wit-
nesses would be permitted without their permission.-

"THE 'FACES' OF THE SKIN FLICKS"
-L.A. Times
"THE FILM SLIPS SOCIAL SIGNIFICANCE
BETWEEN THE SHEETS"
-Cue
"LEAVES :BOB & CAROL & TED & ALICE'
AT TH E STARTING GATE!" -BobSalmaggi,WINS
U plesĀ®
SELASED BY U M FILM DISTRIBUTORS INC.
{ ; .... . ;COLOR BY MOVIELAB
6:45-8:10-9:35
PIFPTH FOrUM
FIFTH AVENUE AT LIERTY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARON
INFORMATION 761-9700
persons upder 18 cannot be admitted
FACES
directed by JOHN CASSAVETES
A dramatic cinema Vertie style look at
middle class America.
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL'
APRIL 10, 11, 12-Fri., Sal., Sun.
7 & 9:30 PM. 75c
S USMMER IS
AT SO UTHAM PTO N'
Students at Southampton College are
encouraged to actively support and participate
in any positive new effort which seeks to improve
t hings in this wobbly world.
x Of course, Southampton, with its delightful summer
climate, offers countless opportunities for
~ lighter types of involvement, too ... like
bpaches. ... boating .. . golf. ... theatres ...
art colonies .., and other activities which make
Southampton a synonym for what summer
S fr should be all about.
Ss d This summer. . . be where it s
Southampton College.#
TWO FIVE-WEEK SESSIONS TWO FOUR-WEEK WORKSHOPS
June 22-July 24 IN SCULPTURE, CERAMICS
July 27- August 28 PAINTING AND FILMS
Concerts and lectures will
\.ACCREDITED UNDERGRADUATE be given by resident must-
COURSES IN HUMANITIES " SCIENCE ca~advstn xet
+ SOCIAL SCIENCE " MARINE SCI- inadvstngepr.
' Et CE "EDUCTIONplus limited grad- Dormitory accommodations
k standofings t Courses are open to are available for students in i
viiigstudents who are in good academic courses and work-
stndngattheir own college. shops.
Director of the Summer Program,l
S OUTHAM PTO N'
_ } ,...COLLEGE1

HOUSTON (--The Apollo 13
astronauts rocketed smoothly
toward the m o o n yesterday
after a launch Which was
marred slightly by the prema-
ture shut off of one rocket
engine.
The spacecraft achieved orbit
despite the early shutdown of one
of the five second stage engines.
The system is designed so that
other engines will provide extra
power if one quits early.
The astronauts James L. Lovell,
Fred W. Haise Jr., and John L.
Swigert Jr. flawlessly docked the
command ship, which they call
Odyssey, with Aquarius, their
lunar lander, and separated the
combined spacecraft from the
third stage rocket hull without
incident.
They then ignited the third
stage' Saturn 5 rocket to leave
earth orbit and headed towards
the moon, 246,524 miles away.
Among the science experiments
to be set up is a seisometer which
will measure moon quakes and
shifts in the lunar crust. A sim-
ilar device was left on the moon
by Apollo 12.
Ground controllers will create
an artificial moon quake by in-
tentionally crashing the third
stage of the Saturn 5 rocket on
the moon.
The third stage, called the 8B,
will be guided to an impact on
Tuesday 124 miles west of the
oApollo 12 seisometer. The rocket
1 will hit with the force of several
tons of TNT and scientists expect
the Apollo 12 instrument will re-
cord the shuddering of the moon's
crust.
After the moon visit, the ascent
stage of the lunar module will also
be crashed on the moon. It will
hit 42 miles from the Apollo. 13
science station and is expected to
be recorded by both seisometers.
Lovell and Haise will spend
more than 33 hours on the surface
of the moon. Early Friday they
will launch the upper stage of
the lunar module Aquarius from
the moon head into lunar orbit
and link up there with Swigert in
the command module.
They'll leave lunar, orbit Satur-
day night, firing a rocket burst
which will start them on the
three-day journey back to earth.
Thomas K. Mattingly II was
prevented from participating in
the flight due to exposure to Ger-
man measles. Swigert took his
place.
Workers in mission control
watched the maneuvers over a
color television, but the hour long
show was not broadcast national-
ly. None of the networks would
i n t e r r u p t previously scheduled
programs.

-Associated Press

Apollo 13 lifts off

FINE THREATENED:
Kirk charged with conte pt
for blocking integration order

By The Associated Press The governor's office warned
A federal judge yesterday found they would open fire if an arrest
Florida Gov. Claude Kirk guilty was attempted, a U.S. attorney
of contempt of court and said he said.
would fine Kirk $10,000 a day un- Kirk denied the charge.
til the governor shows that he is Krentzman set no date for a

The subcommittee will also prohibit witnesses from discussing in compliance with a federal hearing in the case of six Mana-
their testimony outside the hearing room. school integration order. tee deputies who were involved in
Hebert said approximately 40 witnesses will be heard during five Judge Ben Krentzman set a the face-off with the federal, of-
to seven days of hearings. Names of the witnesses will be made public deadline of noon tomorrow for ficers.
Tuesday, he said. compliance with his orders of last Kirk has maintained he is try-
After the hearings the subcommittee will go to Vietnam next week telling Kirk to refrain from ing to block forced busing of some
month to develop additional information, Hebert said. hindering implementation of a 2,600 pupils. He says he is notI
The chairman of the full committee, Rep. L. Mendel Rivers January desegregation order. against integration.
(D-SC) said Friday night he will attempt to stop the court-martials The contempt ruling came after The governor said he will con-
f tho d. Kirk assumed control of the Mana- tinue to ignore Krentzman until
of those accused.tee County school system and ig- the U.S. Supreme Court agrees to
"I had a little something to do with stopping the Green Beret nored orders by the judge to al- hear Kirk's no-busing pleas. He
business and I'm going to have something to do with stopping this," low integration. says he'll abide by any Supreme
he said in a speech at Altus. Okla. Two Kirk aides who sided with Court ruling.
He did not elaborate on what he did in the case of the Green the governor in the school take- Earlier the high court refused
Berets accused of murdering a suspected double agent in South over were also found in contempt to consider Manatee County's ap-
Vietnam. and Krentzman fined them $1,000- peal of a district court order that
a-day with the same conditions - ____
of the ruling against Kirk.
Manatee County Sheriff Rich-
Kirk aides in a confrontation withNeri n
U.S. marshals earlier in the week
was ruled in contempt but not
fined f
Since Kir seized control of theC-
school system last week, he has
twice defied orders from Krentz- By NANCY McLEAN
man to allow desegregation busing "
and has ignored the judge's sum- "Each country must evolve a
mons to appear in court on con- government suitable f o r itself,"
tempt charges. the Nigerian ambassador to the
School officials in Bradenton U.S., J. F. T. Ivalla, told students
had rescheduled school bus routes and faculty Friday afternoon.
to accommodate the extra riders Ivalla gave an informal address
and had begun swapping desks focusing on the post-war period
and teaching materials. But Kirk of the Nigerian war.
moved in last Monday and sus- He said the greatest achieve-
pended the school board and the' ment of the war w a s the en-
system's superintendent. He de- couragement of the Nigerian peo-
Udared 'himself iP control of Mana- ple to work together for national
Ytee schools by executive order. conciliation. A major task will be
TH ROUGHU.S. marshals Friday served the writing of a new constitution.
papers on two Kirk aides, the Contingency plans drawn up by
TRAVEL county sheriff and six deputies, the government during the war
directing them to appear before were put into effect immediately
Cooks Travel Cheques are your passport to adventure. Specia Stu ent Krentzman. The marshals said the at its close. The plans aimed at
Mini-Price, only 50Cper100 issuance charge. With prompt refund if last Justice Department was deter- relieving malnutrition and areas
Mor-P ole.$1wisCoks.n."hare.cWithnpomremined to enforce the desegrega- that were destroyed. On Jan. 13,
or stolen. Go with Cooks..."The Action Money." tion order. 1$30 million of relief was given to

i

told them to implement a desegre-
gation plan just nine weeks before
the end of the school year.
The judge also instructed the
U.S. attorney to investigate all ac-
tions taken by Kirk and local offi-
cials in coinection with the court's
orders..
Krentzman said he would "make
provision for appropriate proceed-
ings" if federal officials felt the
orders were not being followed.
"Claude R. Kirk Jr. is in civil,
contempt of the order of this court
and such contempt is con-
tinuing," Krentzman said in the
ruling. ". . . Kirk shall pay a fine
to the United States of $10,000-
a-day beginning April 11 unless
on or before Monday he shows
this court . . . that he is in com-
pliance with the orders of this
court."

rmbassador speaks to
idents on post-war era

the Red Cross and the National
Rehabilitation Commission by the
Nigerian government.
Ivalla said that many of the do-
nations by other countries often
did not reach their destination.
An example he cited was funds
collected fqr Biafra at Michigan
State University which were turn-
ed over to UNICEF, instead of
the proper recipients.
He expressed mistrust of west-
ern newspapers.
"Most western newspapers are
accompanied by paternalism snap-
judgment, and sensationalism."
A n y "manilestations of com-
munal interest," he continued, are
labeled in the papers as "tribalis-
tic measures."
Ivalla once met representatives
from Time, Newsweek, and the as-
sociated press at the Nigerian Air-

port to inform them on the civil
war. "We talked over cold beer
and chicken dinners."
The following day, he said, sev-
eral of the papers read: "News
representatives await Ambassador
at Nigerian airport for 48 hours
without food."
According to. Ivalla, Nigeria is
too often referred to as a nation
which cannot handle itself. "You
must (realize,'.' he said, "that while
many countries of the world are
directing their major efforts to
landing on the moon, we are just
beginning to develop our agricul-
tural systems."
So far, Ivalla concluded, they
have been able to stand the disas-
ters of war and 4nalnutrition. Ni-
geria's major concern now is with
bringing meaning to the achieved
independence.

I i

U

Security is

0 0 0

sings a song of Revolution unlike any that's ever been sung . . . a movie about things
coming together. Sheer genius ! Godard uses a Rolling Stones recording session as a
grand metaphor for growth; he devotes half the movie's running time to this. An auda-
cious work of art; brilliant! -Joseph Morgen Newsweek; March 30
It haunts the memory so effectively and grows, in retrospect, into a movie experience of
major importance. A Rock fugue. . . so beautifully and carefully composed.
-Vincent Canby New York Times; March 29, 1970
a new feature film by Jean-Luc Godard,
Starring Mi-ck Jagger, Brian Jones,
VKCth Richard, Charlie Watts, Bill Wyrnun,

I

* - . . II

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