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April 07, 1970 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, April 7 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Tuesday, April 7, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Tigers,

Reds

open

season

with

victories

Lolich shuts out Senators, 5-0

Three homers power Reds' win

WASHINGTON (W) - Willie'
Horton and Cesar Gutierrez each
rove in two runs as the Detroit
Tigers whipped the Washington'
Senators 5-0 behind Mickey Lo-
lich's seven-hit pitching yesterday
in the Americafn League's tradi-
tional baseball opener.
Lolich, a 19-game winner last
,year 'but overshadowed by t h e
flamboyant McLain, struck out 10'
and worked his way out of bases-
loaded jams twice in the rain-
delayed, four-hour marathon t in
near-freezing weather.
Nixon made a surprise late arri-
val in the fifth inning and stayed
to the end despite the damp, cold
day that caused the early de-,
parture of nearly three-fourths of
the, 45,015 opening day crowd.
Willie Horton drilled a bases-
loaded double down the left line
to thrust the Tigers into a 2-0
lead in tie first inning and De-
4troit shoved across three more
runs off Washington's beleagured
relief pitching while Nixon watch-
ed in the late innings.
David Eisenhower, the young-
est White House substitute in
history, threw out the first b a 11
in the traditional opening cere-
",, monies after a cold, drizzling rain

had delayed the start of the game'.
for 55 minutes.
Nixon missed 'the customary
Presidential pitch because of a
crucial Senate vote on his Su-
preme Court nomination of Judge
G. Harrold Carswell. He came 1%/
hours later after a victory in the
test vote. .
Rookie Cesar Gutierrez backedi
up Lolich by driving in t w o
runs and scoring two others.
The two teams just missed a
major league record for frustra-
tion by leaving 29 runners on base.!
The all-time high is 30.
The Senators loaded the bases
in the sixth with one out, but Lo-
lich stopped the threat by throw-
ing out one runner at the plate
and getting the next hitter to -pop
up. A double play erased a sim-
ilar uprising the next inning.
The Tigers filled the bases on
two walks and a single off loser
Dick Bosman in the first inning
before Horton rifled his double
into the left field corner. Singles
by Gutierrez, Al Kaline and Norm
Cash added another run in the
sixth.
Gutierrez followed with a two-
run single in the seventh after
the Tigers had loaded the bases

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
MORT NOVECK

again on an error, a hit and a hit
batsman.
The Senators stranded 12 run-
ners against Lolich, who walled
five. Tigers left 17. mainly in the
early innings as Bosman, bother-
ed by wildness, had to pitch out
of three other bases-loaded jams
after Horton's hit.w
The loss was the eighth straight
for the Senators in a Presidential
opener. It was the third time in
the last four years that they have
been shut out in the traditional
game.
An exotic dancer in a micro-
skirt stopped the game in the first
inning by coming out of the stands
to kiss Senator's slugger Frank
Howard.
DETROIT
AB R H BI
McAuiliffe 2b 4 0 .0 0
Gutierrez ss 5 2 3 2
Kaline rf 4 1 2 0
Cash lb 5' 0 1 1
Horton if 2 0 1 2
Northrup cf 5 0 1 0
D.Jones3b 2 0 0 0
Wert 3b 2 1 0 0
Freehan c 3 1 1 0
Lolich p 4 0 0 0
.,Total 36 5 9 5)
WASHINGTON
AB R H BI'
D. Nelson 2b 4 0 0 0
Brinkman ss 4 0 3 0
F. Howard if 5 0 3 0
McMullen 3b 4 0 0 0
Epstein lb 3 0 0 0
H. Allen rf 3 0 0 0
Unser of 3 0 0 0
Casanova c 4 0 1i 0
Bosman p 1 0 0 0
PDina p'0 0 0 0!
Dukesp 0 0 0 0!
Cullen ph 1 0 0 0
Such p 0 0. 0
B. Allen ph 1 0 0 0
Total 33 0 7 0
Detroit 200 001 200--5
Washington 000 000 000-0

CINCINNATI (,,P)-Jim Merritt's
three-hit pitching and home runs
in the fourth inning by Lee May,
Bobby Tolan and Bernie Carbo
carried the Cincinnati Reds to a
5-1 victory over the Montreal Ex-
pos yesterday in the traditional
National League baseball opener.
An opening day crowd of 30.124
sat in damp, cold Crosley Field as
Merritt, who had a 17-9 'record
last year when he was the Reds'
top winner, mastered the Expos
while his teammates supported
him with an eight-hit attack that
included three home runs.
All three homers came in the
fourth inning as Lee May, Bobby
Tolan and Bernie Carbo connected
off Montreal starter Joe Sparma.
May's came with Johnny' Bench.
who had doubled, on base. Carbo's
was the first of his major league
career."
Merritt, meanwhile, had allowed
the Expos only one base runner,
isuing a walk to Bob Bailey in the
second inning. But Bailey was
thrown - out attempting to steal
and as Merritt went into the sev-
enth he had faced the minimum
number of batters.
Gary Sutherland fouled out for
the first 'out, then Rusty Staub

broke up Merritt's no-hit bid by
slamming a triple to right center
field. Staub immediately scored
when Ron Fairly looped a single
to center.
The only other hit off Merritt
was a ninth inning bloop single
to center by Sutherland.
The Reds picked up their final
run in the fifth inning on Pete
Rose's tripel and a sacrifice fly.
The Reds had a couple of mild
threats before their fourth inning
outburst.
Rose had a double in the first
with two out but died on base.

He and Tolan also were left
stranded in the third after a sin-
gle, a force out and a walk.
The Reds' uprising in the fourth
was a combination of hitting
power, with a bit of help from the
wind.
Bench's double was a solid blast
and the homer by May boomed
over the scoreboard, across the
street and through a runway,
going under an expressway.
Carbo's homer was helped by
wind. Tolan's blast got some wind
help but it didn't need it.

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IS BETTER THAN A JOHN V
MOYIE"--
SAYS SPIR
(And When Was He Ev
U of M INTER ART-
On Sale Wed
April 8-1
ART
POETRY
FICTION
DRAMA
ESSAY
PHOTOGR
Available at

WAYNE WESTERN
RO "THE GREAT" AGNEW
ver Wrong?)
S MAGAZINE
.-Fri.
0

on this and that
Bubble gum
,and baseball cards
Teric siegel
THE DAYS when the whole National League west of Phil-
adelphia could be had for a Mickey Mantle and a Yogi
Berra, and a Willie Mays was worth your choice of any twelve
cards in a packet as thick as two decks of playing cards are
gone forever but, I am happy to report, Topps bubble gum base-
ball cards still exist.
Of course, they've changed a little since I saw them last
about ten years ago, the most notable change being that the
piece of bubble gum is only about three-quarters its size during
the Yankee years of the early Fifties. There are also ten cards
for a dime now, instead of six for a nickel. And every package
comes with a paper fold-out of a major league star, probably to
compensate the consumer for the smaller tiece of bubble gum.
These changes though, haven't diminished the semi-
fanatical zeal of the 12 nd under set who collect the rec-
tangular pieces of cardboard. A lot of fads have come and
gone over the years, but baseball cards have somehow main-
tained their traditional appeal.'
It's easy to see why, too. A hoola hoop, for example, just
doesn't have the same sense of adventure that collecting baseball
cards does. Twirling a hoola hoop around your thighs just isn't
the same as flipping Cleon Jones and Pete Rose. The former
might be tintillating; the latter is more in the heart-stopping
category.
Then, too, baseball cards have always been a good deal
more enlightening than the other fads. Where else can you
learn that Paul Casanova hit .274 with Buffalo of the Inter-
national League in 1968 with 23 hits in 84 at bats, or that
Blue Moon Odom was a four sport star in high school in
Georgia, and get a shrunken stick of bubble gum to boot.
If you're lucky enough to buy a pack with Earl Wilson in
it, you'll find out that Earl's 33 career homers are just four short
of the all-time mark for pitchers. The Paul Cassanova card
(No. 84 on your Topps first series check list) reveals that in '66
and '67, the Washington backstop led the league in doubleplays
for a catcher. That reptesents quite a step up in the world,
seeing as how in 1961, Cassanova was catching for the Indiana-
polis Clowns.
But collecting baseball cards wasn't all fun and games.
There was always the inevitable frustration in having seven
of the eight regulars in the Dodgers starting line-up, and
then buying about thirty seven packs of cards trying to get
the eighth, and winding up with ten face cards of Humberto
Robinson. It usually turned out that the only guy in the
neighborhood who had the missing card was the guy you
didn't pick in the stickball game the night before.
The kids who collected the cards didn't really mind the
frustration, though. It was all part of the game. In fact, no-one
really finds anything about baseball cards too objectionable. To
my knowledge, the radicals have yet to attack Topps as a cap-
italist enterprise, and the reactionaries have yet to attack base-
bal cards as corrupting the morals of America's youth by en-
couraging them to engage in flipping and matching.
I suppose that some day some sociologist is going to
come along and tell us that the continued appeal and pop-
ularity of baseball cards is related to some sort of under-
lying fantasy. But collectors of baseball cards, past and
present, know better. They know there's nothing fantastic
about trading the American League West for Cleon Jones
and Tom Seaver.

-Associated Press
JULIE EISENHOWER looks on in amazement and awe as former
vice-president (and unsuccessful candidate for governor of Cali-
fornia) Nixon's son-in-law, David Nixon Eisenhower, throws out
the first ball of the 1970 baseball season. Showing their good taste,
the fans greeted Davey with a rousing chorus of boos which was
repeated when his semi-famous father-in-law arrived.
This Week in Sports
TOMORROW
LACROSSE-Defiance College at Ferry Field, 4:00 p.m.
FRIDAY
RUGBY-Big Ten Tournament at Illinois
'SATURDAY
LACROSSE-University of Cincinnati at Ferry Field, 2:00 p.m.
BASEBALL-Central Michigan, at Ferry Field, doubleheader,
1.00 p.m,

v

'

WELCOME
STUDENTS!
Let ,us style your hair to
vour personlity.. .

fit

ZAPHY

0 8 BARBERS, no weitinq
* OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
Arborland-Campus
Maple Village

FISHBOWL
BOOK STORES
HERB DAVID

-READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS-

r

r

PICK McCAFFERTY:
Colts name new coach

BALTIMORE (P) - Don McCaf-
ferty was named head coach of
the Baltimore Colts yesterday af-
ter serving 11 seasons as an of-,
fensive aide of the National Foot-
ball League team.
McCafferty, 49, replaces D o n
Shula, who quit the team Feb.
18 to become head coach, gener-
al manager and part owner of the
Miami Dolphins.
The sudden departure of Shula,
who posted a fine 71-23-4 record
for seven seasons, caught t h e
Colts by surprise and McCafferty
was immediately cast as the like-
ly replacement from Shula's staff.
Colts' owner Carroll R o s e n-
bloom and his new general man-
ager, Don Klosterman, spent more
than six weeks reviewing a list
of applicants, however, before
staying within the official fam-
ily.
McCafferty joined the Colts in
Today's baseball game with
Eastern Michigan has been
postponed indefinitely because
of poor fi el1d conditions.
Chances. for playing Thursday's
game at the University of De-
troit are not good either, ac-
cording to Coach Moby Bene-
dict.
GRASS
( HANDBOOK
THE MARIJUANA MANUAL
Send $1.00 to Dart Enterprises,
P.O. Box 40, Village Station,
New York, N.Y. 10014

1959 as offensive end coach and
scout under Weeb Ewbank.
When Shula took over the reins
in 1963, McCafferty was named
offensive backfield coach. Dur-
ing games, he replayed. informa-.
tion to the bench from his press
box observation post.
One of McCafferty's main tasks
will be to determine if other Shula
aides, John Sandusky, Dick Biel-
ski, Bobby Boyd and Ed Rutledge,
will stay with the Colts.
He also must hire a replace-E
ment for Bill Arnsparger, the de-
fensive line coach who left the
Colts after the 1969 season and
has joined Shula in Miami.
TODAY'S BASEBALL GAMES j
NATIONAL
Chicago at Philadelphia
New York at Pittsburgh
Cincinnati at Los Angeles, night
Atlanta at San Diego, night
Houston at San Francisco, night
AMERICAN
California at Milwaukee
Oakland at Kansas City
Minnesota at Chicago
Baltimore at Cleveland
Detroit at Washington, night
Boston at New York

\6 .
G d
AUSTIN
D IA MOND

HOPWOOD LECTURE
NADINE GORDIMER..
Novelist, and short story writer. Author of THE SOFT
VOICE OF TH@ SERPENT, A WORLD OF STRANGERS, ..
OCCASION FOR LOVING, SIX FEET OF THE COUNTRY
and others. MISS GORDIMER, a brilliant South African
writer, many of whose writings are banned in her native
country, has published in The New Yorker, Harper's, and
The Atlantic.
Themes and Attitudes in
African Literature
Announcment of the Hopwood Awards for 1970
Will Follow the Lecture
wednesday april 8 8:00 p.m*
rackhan lecture hall
Open to the 'Public

i

a

World Campus Afloat
is a college that does more
than broaden horizons.

I

1209 S. University

663-7151

E'

1

II

It sails to them and beyond.

FINAL
NOTICE
GRADUATES !
Final Day for Ordering
Cap and Gowns Will Be April 15
HA ROLD S. TRICK
711 N. UNIVERSITY

CAMPAIGN/GM
INFORMATION
FOR
GM SHAREHOLDERS
AND
THOSE INTERESTED IN MAKING
GM RESPONSIBLE
1st Floor Union-Wednesday and Thursday'
or
764-4410
CAMPAIGN/GM

I

Again in the 1970-71 academic year, the
accredited World Campus Afloat program of
Chapman College and its associated Colleges
and Universities will take qualified students,
faculty and staff into the world laboratory.
Chapman College currently is accepting
applications for both the fall and spring semesters.
Preliminary applications also may be made for
all future semesters.
Fall semesters depart New York aboard the
s.s. Ryndam for port stops in the Mediterranean
and Latin America, ending in Los Angeles. Spring
semesters circle the world from Los Angeles, stop-
ping in Asia and Africa and ending at New York.
For a catalog and other information, complete
and mail the coupon below.
You'll be able to talk to a World Campus
Afloat representative and former students:
*" Sunday, April 19, 2p.m.
" Motel Pontchartrain
" 2 Washington Blvd., Detroit, Michigan
s.s. Ryndam is of Netherlands registry.

I

L.

R*

I ---

a

Art student Leana Leach of Long Beach
sketches ruins of once-buried city curing
World Campus Afloat visit to Pompeii.

11

I GET
ATTENTION

4 t
'

Gracduating

Petitioning
Now Open fc
Opening on
Studeni

a I
',
r ;
li
{!
t

UUU7F WORLD CAMPUS AFLOAT
,, , Director of Student Selection Services
Chapman College, Orange, Clif. 92666
Please send your catalog and any other facts I need to know.

-

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