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April 07, 1970 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-07

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NGC THEATRE CORPORATION LAST TIMES TODAY

I

NC TEE COPORTONLAST TIMES TODAY
A NATIONAL GENERAL COMPANY
"MAROON ED"
FOH VILLaGE 2:15-4:30
375 No. MAPLE RD.-7694300 6:55-9:30
* STARTS TOMORROW *
"i'M *A.* SH' is what Time
the new freedom 5:107:20
of the screeng
is all about." :
-Richard Schickel, Life
An Ingo Preminger Production
Color by DE~LUXEO
Panavisiong

page three

1m4e

iri t gttn

Dali1;

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Tuesday, April 7, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three
I * ----4

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Kirk assumes

school,

control

Ijl

IIIIL

Is SEAN O'CASEY the greatest play-
wright of the TWENTIETH CEN-
TURY? Or should that title be re-
served for Shaw or Brecht or O'Neill
or another? YOU DECI DE. As part of
the evidence you need to reach your
decision see UNIVERSITY PLAYERS'.
new production of an authentic mas-
terpiece, the poignantly timely study
of revolution,
THE, P OLOUGH AND THE ST ARS,
is rich in comedy and tears, the unfor-
gettable characters. See it at LYDIA
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE on Wed-
nesday through Saturday, April 8-11.
Tickets at Lydia Mendelssohn Box

THE CAMBODIAN ARMY dispatched troops yesterday to
head off Viet Cong who crossed into Cambodia.
The large force of airborne' troops, artillery and armored cars
will try to push the Viet Cong back into South Vietnam from Cam-
bodia. The Viet Cong entered Cambodia at a point 35 miles west of
Saigon, military informants reported.
In another development, students marched through the streets
of Phnom Penh, Cambodia's capitol, in preparation for a "march
for liberty" on Saturday, when the government may proclaim Cam-
bodia a republic, according to some speculations.
Cambodia has been a monarchy for about 1,500 years, and its
ousted leader, Prince Norodom Sihanouk, still is a favorite among
Cambodian 'peasantry.
PARTY AFFILIATIONS have nothing to do with recent in-
dictments of political figures, according to Assistant Atty. Gen.
Will R. Wilson.
Wilson, whose investigations so far have resulted in bribery in-
dictments against a former U.S. senator and a current member of
Congress-both Democrats-indicated more indictments will be forth-
coming.
In four months' time, federal grand juries in New York, Wash-
ington and Baltimore have indicted former Sen. Daniel Brewster
(D-Md), Rep. John Dowdy (D-Texas), Martin Sweig, a onetime top
aide to House Speaker John McCormack (D-Mass), and Nathan
Voloshen, a Washington lawyer and lobbyist who allegedly used
McCormack's office as a base for influence peddling.
In addition a federal grand jury in Newark has indicted Mayor
Hugh Addonizio, a Democrat, for conspiring to commit extortion.
"The fact that they're in public office and doing these things
is what we're intested in," Wilson said. "We're totally indifferent to
their party."
* * *
NORTH VIETNAMESE TROOPS held a U.S. Special Forces
camp near Laos under siege for the sixth day yesterday.
South Vietnamese military headquarters said that 496 North1
Vietnamese soldiers were killed yesterday-466 of them in a single
battle around the besieged camp at Dak Saeng.
It was estimated that this could be the largest number killed
in one fight in the war.
* * *
THE SUPREME COURT yesterday authorized the states to
limit the amount of welfare assistance that any one family may
receive.
In a 5-3 decision, the high court said that whether such ceilings
are humane or moral is not the Supreme Court's business. Judge
Potter Stewart, speaking for the court, said that federal law permits
the states great latitude in distributing their "finite resources."
The ruling, which came in a Maryland case, has direct effect in
the 20 states that impose limits on aid to individual families.
Stewart said that the Constitution's guarantee of equal protec-
tion does not mean children in large families are entitled to the
same amount of assistance that children in smaller welfare families
receive.
* * *
MACOMB COUNTY PROSECUTOR George Parris has an-
nounced his candidacy for the Democratic nomination for
governor.
He will be competing with State Senator Sander M. Levin (D-
Berkley), State Rep. George F Montgomery and former state party
chairman Zolton Ferency for the Democratic nomination, Stephen
C. Miller, a wealthy Birmingham banker, is also expected to announce
his candidacy.
The winner of the nomination will probably face incumbent
Republican Governor William Milliken.
- * *
THE WELFARE PLAN proposed by President Nixon comes up
for consideration today by the House Rules Committee.
Although the bill has already been approved by the House Ways
and Means Committee, it is still highly controversial.
The Committee for Economic Development, a private research
organization, yesterday proposed a broader and $2 billion costlier
plan than the administration's.
However, the United States Chamber of Commerce took an op-
posing stand, running large paid ads in Washington newspapers and
The Wall Street Journal to condemn what it called Nixon's "radical
and revolutionary move toward a guaranteed family income."
Nixon's program assures a yearly minimum of $2,400 for a family
of four.

pa today at 3 p.m. - three hours after Kirk is
opening session of the Florida Legislature.
Kirk took command of the school system
ordered the teachers and 17,-,

-Associated Press
More trouble in Belfast
British troops guard an electrical goods shop in Belfast, North
Ireland, yesterday, after a time bomb exploded in the doorway.
Two persons were later arrested by the Army, and no more in-
cidents were reported. Rioting erupted in the city last Wednes-
day and British moved in to restore order.
LABOR DISPUTES GO ON:
Senate group votes
to avert rail strike

000 pupils to defy a federal in-
tegration decree.
Saing he was acting in the best
interests of the children, Kirk took
over after temporarily suspending
the members of the county school
board and the school superin-
tendent.
Some three hours after classes
began, Kirk said school was being
conducted "orderly and quietly."
Kirk said he had petitioned the
U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals
for permission to intercede in the
case and would remain in charge
of the Manatee schools "until I
get my day in court."
In Washington, the White House
said the federal government will
cooperate in carrying out the
court integration order. Press sec-
retary Ron L. Ziegler said the
cooperation could come in the
form of sending in U.S. marshals
or starting to show cause for legal
proceeding.
The Rev. C. D. Lazier, president
of the Manatee County chapter
of the National Association for
the Advancement of Colored Peo-
ple-which brought the integra-
tion suit-said NAACP attorneys
would take any legal action they
could.
The highest court in, the land
says do one thing and the governor
says do another," Lazier said.
The governor said he stepped in
because it made no sense to in-
tegrate 45 days before the end of
school and because the order in-
volved . . . "a horrible illegal act
of forced busing."
The order was upheld by the
full U.S. Supreme Court without
comment last Friday. It called for
the busing of an additional 2,600
pupils and transfer of 107 teach-
ers, effective Monday, to achieve
a racial ratio of 80 per cent white
and 20 per cent black.

By The Associated Press
Labor problems continued yes-
terday as the Senate Labor Com-
mittee took the first step toward
averting a nationwide rail strike
Saturday, as truck drivers con-
tinued wildcat strike actions across
the cocntry, and as the transpor-
tation secretary threatened to re-
move organizers of the Air Con-
trollers' strike.
The Senate Labor Committee
voted unanimously, but with con-
siderable reluctance, to approve a
bill asked by President Nixon
which would impose a settlement
on the unions and carriers,
The measure is to be taken up
by the Senate tomorrow and will
probably be sent to the House that
day.
The President's bill would put
into effect for the remainder of
this year an agreement worked out
by negotiators for the parties in
December.
Meanwhile, truck drivers step-
ped up picketing and wildcat strike
activity yesterday. In Chicago, a
Teamster Union official suggested
selective strikes might be used to
avert a total walkout.
Many of the nation's 425,000
Teamsters union members were
signaling their dissatisfaction with
a national contract tentatively
agreed to last week which pro-
vided hikes of $1.10 an hour over
a three-year period.

BRADENTON, Fla. (M - A federal judge has ordered Gov.
Claude Kirk to appear in court to show cause why he should
not be held in contempt for personally taking command of
Manatee County's public school system and forbidding teach=
ers and pupils to comply with desegregation orders.
U.S. District Judge Ben Krentzman said yesterday that
Kirk and "other persons in active concert with him have fail-
ed or refused to resume full operation of the Manatee school
system in conformity with that order."
Kirk was ordered to appear in Krentzman's court in Tam-

to address the
yesterday and

In the airlines dispute, Trans-
portation Secretary John A. Volpe
threatened yesterday to remove all
organizers of the Air Controllers'
strike as well as those he said have
intimidated others into stopping
work.
A spokesman for the Federal
Aviation Administration said in
New York that 880 of the /2,864
controllers who have called in
"sick" during the 13-day job ac-
tion have returned. Movement of
air traffic has improved some-
what.

Hunt for
assassins
By The Associated Press
Guatemalan security f o r c e s
stepped up their hunt for members
of the leftist Rebel Armed Forces
(FAR) after the body of kidnaped
West German Ambassador Karl
Von Spreti was found Sunday.
West German Foreign Minister
Walter Scheel announced yester-
day that the government has or-
dered its diplomats in Guatemala
to return home as a result of the
slaying.
Scheel also indicated that his
government~ would like to see the
recall of Guatemala's ambassador
to Bonn, Antonio Gandara.
Scheel told a news conference
that the action did not mean a
breaking off of diplomatic rela-
tions between the two governments,
but added that West Germany
might take further action when it
gets a full report on the ambas-
sador's murder.
Count Von Spreti was kidnaped
last Tuesday and killed Sunday
after the Guatemalan government
refused to meet FAR demands for
the release of 22 jailed FAR mem-
bers and $700,000 in ransom
money.
The terrorists had warned sev-
eral times that they would kill the
diplomat if the demands were not
met.
However, the Guatemalan gov-
ernment refused to release the
prisoners because they were al-
ready sentenced by the courts or
scheduled for court action, and to
release them would violate the
Guatemalan constitution.
The Guatemalan government
had previously released FAR men
in exchange for its own kidnaped
foreign minister and an abducted
American diplomat.
The government imposed a 30-
day state of siege on the coun-
try, giving security forces extra-
ordinary powers. Police patrols
were seen on almost every other
block of the capital. Some homes
were searched, but as of yesterday
there was no report of any ar-
rests.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Toes-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published' Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier. P$.00 by
mail.

Inglis: Housing regents

Office,

Monday - Tuesday, 12:30 -

5:00 P.M., Wednesday - Saturday,

12:30-8:00 P.M.

P h o n e 668-6300.

Performances begin at 8:00 P.M.

(Continued from Page 1)
with esoteric works on aesthetics.
The room contains a picture of
Detroit industrialist James Inglis,
who had the home built in 1927
and bequeathed it to his wife, who
later gave it to the University.
It is in this room that the Re-
gents mull over issues like the
student bookstore, University by-
laws and ROTC - sometimes re-
questing coffee and donuts which,
incidentally, are the same fare
Student Government C o u n c iI
members have during their Thurs-
day meetings.
Mrs. Leidy believes the discus-
sions generally end around 11 p.m.

DOUBLE FEATURE-ENDS TONIGHT

"TOTAL INSANITY
.. .PROVOKES-
UN.CONTROL-
ABLE LAUGHTER."
-Mich. Daily
"Funniest Picture of
the year."
-E. Village Other
4...
..
6:30and 9.40-
POPTH FOf'UM]
f owym HAVENUW AT l$ERTY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
tNFORMATION 75-9700

A very beautiful, very
romantic movie."
-New York Times
f"'More' is tough, can-;
did stuff, clearly
among the good
~"

The"
77th Annual
Ann Arbor
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA IN ALL CONCERTS
THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. Preludes: "O Mensch, bewein' dein' Sunde" and
"Wachet auf" (Bach-Ormandy); and Mahler Symphony No. 2 in C minor ("Resur-
rection") with EVELYN MANDAC, Sporano, BIRGEIT FINNILA, Contralto; and
the UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION.
FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 8:30
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor. EVELYN MANDAC, Sporano, and THE UNIVER-j
SITY CHORAL UNION in Stabat Mater (Poulenc) and "Prologue" (Alan Stout)-
both for Sporano, Chorus and Orchestra. ALICIA DE LARROCHA, Pianist, in Mozart
Concerto, No. 19, in F major, K. 459.
SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. Tone Poem, "Don Juan" (Strauss), VAN CLI-
BURN, Pianist, in Concerto No. 1 in B-flat minor, Op. 23 (Tchaikovsky); "To the
Victims of Hiroshima"-Threnody (Penderecki); and Suite No. 2 from "Daphnis and
Chloe" (Ravel).
SUNDAY, APRIL 26, 2:30
THOR JOHSON, Conductor. Bach "Magnificat" with BENITA VALENTE, Soprano;
MARY BURGESS, Contralto; JON HUMPHREY, Tenor; LESLIE GUINN, Baritone;
and THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION-SMALL CHORUS. Debussy's "La Da-
moiselle elue" with BENITA VALENTE, Soprano, and BIRGIT FINNILA, Contralto;
and WOMEN'S CHORUS OF THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION. ITZHAK
PERLMAN, Violinist, in Concerto No. 2 in G minor, Op. 63 (Prokofieff).j

and says sometimes the Regents
stay overnight in some of the nine
guest rooms. She notes that Paul
Goebel (R-Grand Rapids) and
William Cudlip (R-Grosse Point
Shores) slept there last Tuesday.
But the Regents are by no
means the only guests who stay
at the home.
Since it is the guest residence
of the University, many disting-
uished visitors often stay or dine
at Inglis. Past guests have in-
cluded Robert Frost, U-Thant, Jo-
nas Salk and Gregory Peck.
Dignified Inglis house is, and
that air of elegance and medieval
mystery never seems to disappear.
Especially on those Thursday
nights when the Regents set Uni-
versity policy downstairs.
Program Info: NO 2-6264
SEE THE "OSCAR" SHOW
10 PM ICOLOR
ON YOUR ABC-TV CHANNEL
@1 AMPS
HELD OVER!
5th WEEK..
SHOWS AT:
NOMINATED FOR 9
ACADEMY AWARDS

8:00 only

STARTS WEDNESDAY
6:45-8:10-9:35

NTS FILMS W
A Division of
National Talent Service, Inc.
Proudly Presents
THE MAYSLES BROTHERS' NEW FILM
KALES1iAN
The Most HighlyAcclaimed
Film Of The Yearl
"Hard-hitting, anti-establishment
stuff."-Judith Crist / "I wasspell-
bound. I've seen SALESMAN three
times and each time I've been more
impressed. Fascinating, very funny,
unforgettable."-Vincent Canby,
New York Times / "Probably the
most important film you will see this
year."-Joseph Gelmis, Newsday /
"Impossible to over-estimate. There
'is no doubt that we shall see SALES-
MAN as a turning point in the history
of film."-Film Society Review /
"An extraordinary film no one dares
miss."-New York Magazine / "An
experience that sticks in the mem-

i

"LEAVES "BOB &CAROL & TED & ALICE'
AT THE STARTING GATEI" -sob sameswVNs

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