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April 05, 1970 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, April 5, 1970

PaeTwleH_ MCIGNAL

Su-day.111,115.1970

I

Voters to pick new
City Council seats

(Continued from Page 1)
Stephenson said, "The most im-
portant issue is whether or not we
are going to have continued Dem-
ocratic dominance on council. The
spending and permissiveness are
crucial issues. The most glaring
example of permissiveness is the
time they called a special council
meeting to allow the White Pan-
thers to use West Park."
In the Fifth Ward, Cappaert's
primary concern is with black-
white relations. "The Affirmative
Action Program which has al-
ready been passed should be car-

The polls will be open from
7 a.m. to 8 p.m. tomorrow for
the city election.
Registered voters may vote at
the following precinct stations:
1-1 Northside School, 1-2 Ann
Arbor Community Center, 1-3
Jones School, 1-4 North' Cam-
pus C oimmo n s, 1-5 Thurston
School, 2-1 YMCA on Fifth
Ave. and William, 2-2 Mich-
igan League, 2-3 Angell School,
2-4 Bader. School, 3-1 Burns
Park School, 3=2 Tappan Jun-
ior High, 3-3 fire station on E.
Stadium, 3-4 Allen School, 3-5
Pattengill School.
3-6 Pittsfield School, 3-7
Mary Mitchell School, 4-1 Eb-
erwhite S c h o o 1, 4-2 Bock
School, 4-5 Eberwhite School,
4-6 Lawton School, 4-7 Yost
Field House, 5-1 Wines School,
5-2 West Park shelter, 5-3
S I a w s o n School, 5-4 Mack
School, 5-5 Haisley School, 5-6
Lakewood School, 5-7 fire sta-
tion on Jackson Ave.'
vied out." The Program calls for
the city's hiring more blacks and
redefining job descriptions so that
this can be done.
Fairbanks' seven point program
includes the following:
- maintaining City Transpor-
tation Authority but "fund it ra-
tionally";
- asking University's assistance
to pay for police overtime;
-- operating within the city's
budget rather than asking in -
creased taxes;
-- additional recreation p r o-
grams for teenagers and y o u n g
adults;
- better public relations f o r
public housing commission;
- taking "politics out" of new
human rights commission to make
it effective.
- appointing a "blue ribbon
committee" on the environment.
Candidates were divided about
the recent strike on campus and
the demands of the Black Action
Movement (BAM). However, they
were almost unanimous in sup-
port of the way that President
Robben Fleming handled the sit-
uation.
Kirscht said, "I'm generally in
support of the kinds of things
BAM wants - especially increas-

ed enrollment. The class boycottls
good if people feel it is necessary
but I don't go along with violence
or disruptions."
Hilbert was unavailable for com-
ment.
"It is within the University toy
settle. I'm sympathetic to the
BAM demands and I'm glad they
were ratified by the Regents,"
Quenon said.
Weaver was unavailable for
comment.
Mrs. Owens said, "I'm in fav-
or of the demands. Fleming was
under all kinds of pressure and
did a very admirable job under
the conditions. I would have lik-
ed to see it end faster but the
strike was good and very effec-
tive."
Edwards did not want to com-
ment.
"I support some of the demands
but not all. Standards shouldn't
be lowered to admit more blacks.
They didn't have to be as ex-
treme as the strike," said Fer-
guson.
Stephenson said he was "not
sympathetic to specific demands
and not in accord with the way
the University handled the strike.
But I don't get all the facts. I
don't believe in strikes period-
I have yet to see one I would
support."
' Cappaert supported both the
BAM demands and the strike and
and thought Fleming's handling
of the situation was "excellent."
Fairbanks did not want to com-
ment.
KD5,:P17TICnI1iRI(

Statement
released
by BAM
(Continued from Page 1)
problem of a precedent that could
be set by the case.
A trial of students for non-
academic offenses outside of an
all-student judiciary, he says, is a
"precedent the Regents and the
administration w o u ld like to
see continued."
The BAM statement asserts that
in reaching the agreement with
Fleming, the BAM negotiators
realized that much of the har-
mony generated during the offi-
cially non-violent strike "could be
lost by allowing a few crude, cruel
and vindictive faculty members
and administrators to penalize
students who were determined to
get all of the BAM demands met."
During the negotiations, accord-
ing to the statement, it was un-
derstood that the hearing officers
for the cases would only be ap-
pointed after the president had
consulted with BAM representa-
tives.
BAM continues that it is their
interpretation that a student, if
dissatisfied with the hearing offi-
cer or officers chosen for his case,
may elect to appear before an-
other hearing officer.
It was also understood between
both negotiating p a r t i e s, the
statement said, that a student
could appeal an unfavorable deci-
sion to the president, who would
then assign a new hearing offi-
cer who would re-try the case.

MUSIC LOVERS CHOICE!
. .t Sony Model 125
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Ann Arbor-East Lansingy'
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"I

SUNDAY, APRIL 4, 1970-from 1-4 P.M.
He has previously been shown at New Master's Gallery, Alexan-
dria, Va., at Chanel Gallery, Washington, D.C., etc. including a
one-man show at Dal-Pac Gallery, Pacific, Calif.
STERN SEES LIFE AS A CONTINUOUS SERIES OF RELATIONSHIPS AND FEELS
THAT BY UNDERTANDING THESE RELATIONSHIPS WE BEGIN TO UNDER-
STAND OURSELVES AND OUR ENVIRONMENT.
B'NAI BRITH HILLEL FOUNDATION-1429 Hill St.

s

1

,.

"Showings of Paintings by Ned Stern"

(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)
The revolutionists have spread
the word. "Come to Ann, Arbor,
Michigan, this summer. It's, an
open city under the permissive
olicies of the Democrats."
Isn't that a riot?

4

i

ic'

i.

fill

LOIS OWENS

S Democratic Candidate for Council
Third Word
In one short year, the Democratic Administration in Ann Arbor has demonstrated what
imaginative and vigorous leadership can achieve. There were no public housing units built in
Ann Arbor until one year ago. There are now 151 units under construction and 400 more
units planned. Zoning classifications hove been changed to provide for open space and to
meet landscape criteria. An Air Pollution Control ordinance will soon be passed. Despite
Republican opposition, the Democrats have perserved in supporting a bus system, which lavs
the foundation for a forward looking transportation plan to halt uncontrolled growth of car
traffic. Without such a plan, endless traffic increase threatens to obliterate pedestrian travel
and compel destruction of the city's traditional beauty, as everything makes way for parking
structures and endless road widenings. Passage of a Human Rights ordinance which positively
attackss discrimination is a model for the country. Again, against Republican opposition, the
Democratic majority on Council upheld the Supreme Court rulings on freedom of expression.
The recently passed Housing Code and Damage Deposit escrow, provision protect tenants from
unconscionable landlords and developers. I will help maintain and enlarge this type of pro-
gram and continue positive and forward-looking government in Ann Arbor.
During the coming year, the Ann Arbor City Council will deal with many issues having
a direct and important effect on the everyday lives of students. The Mayor and other Demo-
crats on City Council have scheduled frequent, open sessions at City Hall and in locations
throughout the city to facilitate citizen contact with city government. We demonstrated that
more could be done by establishing procedures for deputy registrars to register students at
convenient locations on campus and in areas of concentrated student housing. This was im-
plemented, and should be continued. A special city ombudsman's office should be established
to handle student concerns, so that student influence is felt and city proposals reflect a real
awareness of student input.
Over three thousand residents of Ann Arbor petitioned City Council to place a referendum
an the War before the electorate on April 6. Despite opposition by Republican Councilmen,
it was passed by City Council and was to be placed on the ballot. However, an opponent was
able to obtain a court injunction and an appeal was denied. Ann Arbor voters have a right to
vote on a question which' so affects their own lives and the lives of Vietnam citizens. Without
continued strong opposition by those of us who have been opposing the War, the War will
not end. If elected Councilwoman, I will work to see that a referendum on the War goes
back on the ballot at the earliest possible date and stays on the ballot.

Vote
before

Republican.

It

gets

worse,

Monday, April 6

4

A NOTE OF XPLA A TION-

I

The Above Advertisement Appeared Thursday, April 2 in the Ann Arbor News,. We Have Re-

printed It to Show the Type of Fear Campaign the Republican Party

Is Waging Throughout

the Non-Student Areas of Ann Arbor. The Conservative Republican Candidates Are Counting

on a Low Student Vote to Stymie the Harris Administration.

This Monday, April 6, V o t e to

Continue the Democratic Policies of Reason and Fairness.
&r= A mWw!&1 a dT A a ^ A k % A kI A I A n i £

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