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April 02, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 11 1 1 1

E

11

PjGjIj ~~*t

Carnival on Diag
APRIL 6-10
12 Noon-4 P.M.

-free

*

FOOD

* CONCESSIONS
* LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
12 Noon-5 P.M.
* SPECIAL GIVEAWAYS
* ASSORTED SPECTACULARS

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE to bring peace to Cam-
bodia, Laos and Vietnam, was proposed yesterday by the French
government.
Paris is ready 'to "offer its active contribution to this enterprise,"
the government said. The three countries were formerly part of French
Indochina.
The French offer appeared to be aimed at reconvening the nations
that took part in the Geneva conferences on Indochina in 1954 and
1962.;
The first conference settled the French colonial war and the
second laid the basis for a neutral Laos.
* * *
A 15 PER. CENT BOOST in Social Security benefits took
effect yesterday, adding $4 billion a year to consumer buying
power and firming the nation's defenses against a recession.
The increase in old age and disability payments to 25.5 million
recipients is retroactive to Jan. 1. The three-month back payments will
all be mailed this month, adding more than $1 billion to regular
benefit checks.
White House economists are counting on this infusion of new
disposable income, followed at midyear by the end of the 5 per cent
income tax surcharge, to shore up the demand for new cars and
other consumer goods.
MOBS OF CATHOLICS AND PROTESTANTS battled last night
in the streets of Belfast.
British troops used riot gas to clear the crowds from the streets
and hundred of soldiers trucked to the scene as snipers opened fire for
the first time since the riots of last fall.
Two square miles of the city were sealed off by troops led by
specialists trained to penetrate riots and snatch out the ringleaders.
RADICAL JAPANESE STUDENTS continue to dispute with
government officials over the fate of a hijacked airplane.
The Japan Air Lines plane, which has been grounded for over 40
hours, holds 115 weary travellers and about 15 hijackers who are
members of the Red Army, a radical Japanese student group.
The hijackers want to take the plane to Pyongyang, North Korea,
but refuse to leave until they are assured they will not be shot down
by South Korean antiaircraft.
Until they receive this assurance, the hijackers refuse to release
any of the passengers.
.
AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS declared yesterday they will
not return to work soon.
They demanded that negotiations be opened with a third party,
but the government contended they are returning to their jobs.
The controllers' statement, claiming most of their men are strik-
ing, appeared to block hopes for a quick end to the dispute that has
chocked air traffic across the country for more than a week.
The government has said that it will not negotiate until all the
men return to work.
THE MASSACHUSETTS LEGISLATURE enacted a bill yes-
terday which would bar Massachusetts residents from serving in
any war not declared by Congress.
The bill aims to set up a test of the legality of the Vietnam war
by institution of court action by the state to bring the question to the
United States Supreme Court.
The Massachusets governor, Francis Sargent, has not yet in-
dicated whether he will sign the bill, which passed the overwhelmingly
Democratic House and Senate easily.
* * *
A TWO-MONTH STRIKE by 6,064 tugboat men in New York
harbor ended yesterday.
Although the strike had little effect on the general public, it cost
an estimated $35 million in revenues and wages and forced ocean
liners to dock themselves.
Strike leader Joseph O'Hare called the settlement "one of best if
not the best in the country." The strikers settled on a 53.6 per cent
wage hike and benefit package increases.
The settlment was expected to bring increased charges for tug
services but industry spokesmen would not comment until they had
had a greater opportunity to analyze the terms.

$

Sit 'igan

4

HAVE YOUR LUNCH ON THE DIAG
aril YostField Hous50Uc
Fri., Apr. 10-7 P.M.-12
Sat., Apr. 11-12 Noon-5:30 P.M.; 7 P.M.-12
Sunday, April 12, 12 Noon --6 P.M.
* Amusement Rides
Game Booths
* Contests-Pizza Eating
Yo-Yo, etc.
CABARET
Way-Off Broadway Show
"What Are You Wearing
to the Revolution?"
Fria rs

acres of table grapes.
"We welcome the three growers
who have so laudably brought to
a conclusion the contract," said
Archbishop Timothy Manning in
a prepared statement. "It is our
ardent hope that this day's busi-
ness will be but the beginning of
a chain of such contracts so that
prosperity and peace can o n c e
more descend into our fields and
homes.
The Coachella Valley produces
about 10 per cent of California's
table grapes.
The contract calls for $1.75 an
hour, plus a 25-cent bonus f or
each box picked.
In addition, growers will con-
tribute 10 cents an hour to a un-
ion health and welfare fund and
two cents a box to a union fund
for elderly 'farm workers - most-
ly Filipinos and Mexican-Ameri-
cans - too old to work.
Workers will also be paid for
jury and witness duty. The prev-
ious pay' rate in the valley was
$1.65 an hour and 15 cents a box.
Negotiations were arranged by
the Catholic Bishops Committee
on Farm Labor.
The committee was formed tc
aid in the grape dispute-mediated
talks with the three growers which
began one week ago and ended
at 3 a.m. Tuesday. The churchr
says, however, that it does not
take sides in the dispute.

-Associated Press
CAESAR CHAVEZ of the United Farm Workers and Lionel Stein-
berg, a California grape grower,;announce a contract agreement
between the farm workers union and three grape growers.

page three
Thursday, April12, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

Grape

workers

win partial gains
LOS ANGELES (A) - Contract agreement between the
AFL-CIO farm workers union and three growers representing
about one-seventh of the table grape production in the Coa-
chella Valley was announced yesterday at the headquarters
of the Los Angeles Roman Catholic diocese.
The United Farm Workers Organization Committee,
headed by Cesar Chavez, has sponsored a nationwide boycott
of California table grapes as part of a four-year struggle to
win recognition from growers.
The three growers are the David Freedman Co. of Ther-
mal-Indio, Calif.; Wonder Palms Ranch of Indio,, Calif., par-
tially owned by Freedman, and Travertine Ranch, of Oasis,
Calif., owned by Charles Freedman. The three cultivate 7,800

I4 i n

Teamster-
strikes
spread
WASHINGTON 0') - Spread-
ing Teamsters Union strikes crip-
pled or slowed trucking in at least
22 cities yesterday but industry
negotiators went back to national
wage talks pledging they would
not retaliate with a nationwide
lockout.
"The industry intends at this
moment to take no retaliatory ac-
tion," s a i d Trucking Employers
Inc., the management group that
three years ago closed down vir-
tually the entire nation's truck-
ing industry in response to scat-
tered strikes before a settlement
was finally reached.
Chief industry negotiator Ray
F. Beagle said the current strikes
are "massive," compared with the
walkouts during the 1967 nego-
tiations.* However, it appeared
most of the 425,000 truck_ drivers
covered by the national wage talks
are remaining on the job.
Their contract expired Tuesday
midnight with a gap of at least
80 cents an hour over three years
between Teamsters' wage demands
and industry offers. Most drivers
now average $4 an hour.
The industry's pledge against a
lockout somewhat eased the pres-
sure on President Nixon in deal-
ing with this new major trans-
portation crisis along with t h e
continuing slowdown of federal
airline traffic controllers, a po-
tentially explosive nationwide rail-
road labor dispute and uncertain-
ty over postal negotiations.
The Nixon administration asked
the Teamsters union and the
trucking industry for special ar-
rangements to continue handling
of defense materials and perish-
able commodities.

NEW CHARGES

Army accuses MedMia
in My Lai massacre
ATLANTA, Ga. (N) - The Army filed new charges against
Capt. Ernest L. Medina yesterday, accusing him of responsi-
bility for the death of all civilians allegedly massacred by his
company at My Lai in 1968.
Medina, 33, of Pico Rivera, Calif., was commander of
Company C during the raid on the Vietnamese village. One of
his platoon leaders was Lt. William L. Calley Jr., who is
charged with murder or assault in the incident.
The Army said in an announcement at nearby Ft. Mc-
Pherson, where My Lai investigations are being consolidated,
that Medina "was responsible for the alleged murder of Viet-
namese noncombatant persons allegedly committed by mem-
- bers of his company ..."

Bishop Joseph F. Donnelly, aux-
iliary bishop of Hartford, Conn.,
and committee chairman, said,
"The Committee is.confident that
this breakthrough will serve as a
pattern for others who wish to
help solve this prolonged dispute."
Asked how he knew it was a
breakthrough, Bishop Donnelly
said, "I base it on conversations
with other growers.".
Chavez said the contract in-
cludes "a very good section on
pesticides" which forbids the use
of several chemicals including
DDT. Farm workers have com-
plained of illness due to pesti-
cides;:

Cinema V GREAT D1RECTORS' FESTIVAL
DOUBLE FEATURE-ENDS TONIGHT
SWho killed Ursula Gray?
F~ I
THE
~~~~'OEL'MURDER CASE
Directed by Michael Truman-The Creator of "The Lavender Hill Mob"
A CINEMAV PRESENTATION
"Stout thriller . . tough
and realistic"-Time
Model Murder, 7:15 Accident, 9:00

1

"1

"TWO MASTER CRAFTS-
MEN AT WORK! A FILM
TO WATCH WITH FASCI-
NATION!" - Judith Crist,
NBC Today
ACCIDENT'

WINNER TWO CANNES FILM FESTIVAL AWARDS
screenplay HAROLD PINTER-directed by JOSEPH LOSEY
DOUBLE FEATURE-FRIDAY & SATURDAY

MAGICIANS OF
BASKETBALL
In Person
featuring
GINNY TIU
REVUE
MON., APR. 6--7:30 P.M.
U.M. CRISLER ARENA
TICKETS: $4.00-3.00-2.00
-discount for kids-
Call 662-3238-Tickets
on sale U.M. Athletic Dept.
1000 S. State St.
Read and Use
Daily Classijfeds

Fire guts
black center
at Cornell
ITHACA, N.Y. (JP)-Fire gutted
the black studies center at Cornell
University yesterday and school
officials said the possibility of
arson would be "fully investi-
gated."
The university also promised al-
ternate facilities to house the
center and said the new site would
be guarded.
The blaze at the African Studies
and Research Center came about
six weeks after a fire bomb attack
on a black women's dormitory.
A cross burning at the dormi-
tory, Wari House, less than a year
ago escalated into a building seiz-
ure by militant blacks.
University officials did not im-
mediately connect the destruction
of the center with the fire bomb-
ings andscross burning, saying
there was no .indication yet
whether arson was involved in the
early morning fire.
University President Dale R.
Corson said, however : "The pos-
sibility of, arson will be fully in-
vestigated. An act of arson would
represent an assault not only on
the center, the black students, but
on Cornell University, on each of
us and on everything we stand
for:."

A spokesman said that under
Article 118 of the Uniform Code
of Military Justice, Medina was
charged with murder as a prin-
cipal and did not have to be pres-
ent during the slayings to be held
responsible.
Medina has denied knowledge
of any mass killings in the ham-
let which was raided by troops of
the Americal Division March 16,
1968.
The announcement of the lat-
est charges gave no figures on the
number of deaths Medina is held
responsible for, but the company
commander told CBS News in an
interview that the figure is 175.
On March 10th he was charged
with killing four persons. These
charges accuse him of the "mur-
der of two persons on or about
16 March 1968, maiming and
murder of one suspected enemy
person, and murder of another,
during their interrogation,,late in
the day of about 16 March 1968
and assault with a deadly weapon
on a third individual while inter-
rogating him on or a b o u t 17
March 1968,"
The latest charge was substit-
uted for one filed March 17, ac-
cusing Medina of concealing
knowledge of a felony. Eleven
other officers, including two gen-
erals, have been charged w i t h
dereliction of duty by the Army
alleging they suppressed informa-
tion on the My Lai incident.
An Army spokesman said spe-
cifically that t h e latest charge
against Medina would if proved
make the captain responsible for
the 102 persons Calley is accused
of killing.

Ann Arbor City Council passed
a resolution Tuesday calling for a
softening of parking restrictions
in residential areas.
The move, intended to m a k e
parking more convenient for res-
idents, appears to counter t h e
council's previous trend of moving
the city toward the goal of no ov-
ernight parking on any street in
the city.
The resolution was supported by
the seven Democratic councilmen
and opposed by the three Repub-
licans on the council.
The resolution states that the
current switch parking regula-
tions "cause unnecessary and
costly inconvenience for m a n y
residents of Ann Arbor" and says
that they can be modified "with-
out impairment of the sweeping
of streets.".
. The resolution was presented by
Third Ward Councilman Nicholas
Kazarinoff and First Ward Coun-
cilman John Kirscht and calls for
the action that:
- These regulations (traffic
control orders) be altered togeth-
er with street signs to conform
to the following principle: in res-

idential areas where there is cur-
rently no parking from 2 a.m. to
5 a.m. three mornings a w e e k
there shall be no parking from 2
a.m. to 5 a.m. only one morning
a week beginning Sept. 1, 1970, or
earlier;
- On those residential streets
where parking is switched from
one side of the street to the other
every twelve hours, the signs shall
be altered to minimize, beginning
Sept. 1, 1970 or earlier, the in-
convenience to residents and yet
permit the necessary flow of traf-
fic; and,
- The Department of Traffic
Engineering and Transportation
working together with t h e De-
partment of Public Works bring to
this council on June 1 specific
plans for accomplishing the first
two objectives, it being understood
that this program will be includ-
ed in the 1970-71 budget.
City Administrator G uy Lar-
com, Jr. said the intent of the
switch parking from 2 a.m. to 5
a.m. was - in addition to street
cleaning - to promote the turn-
over of parking places. "The
streets are not made for the stor-
age of vehicles," he said.

RESTRICTIONS END:
City Council votes to ease
overnight parking bans

"May w e I I be the m o s t
beautiful film ever made."
-NEWSWEEK
"Beyond verbal description"
-N.Y. TIMES

_ f

1

MORGAN!
Is
"HOWLINGLY
FUNNY"
-Bo* y cowha.Nworrimm
"HILARIOUS"
"BRILLIANT"

detroit studei. summer theatre
actors---directors---technicians
THE BUSKIN COMPANY
is holding
AUDITIONS

PRESENTS
SINGIN' IN'
THE RAIN,
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PETULA
Starring JULIE CHRISTIE, GEORGE C. SCOTT
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