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March 28, 1970 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-28

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 28, 1970

gi II

CHERCHEZ LA FEMME
A LA MAISON FRANCAISE
MEN-Do you want to live in a
French atmosphere? If you
speak some French come join
us at the French Co-op (Oxford
Housing) next fall.
CALL MARCELLE
this weekend 764-2147
EXTRA
TALL,
SUITS and
SPORT COATS
At
211 S. Main St.

Netmen

seek

noth er

By RANDY PHILLIPS
At the first break of warm,
weather, out came the guitars and
singing on the Diag. Simultane-
ously, and in the spirit of spring,
out came the tennis rackets as
well.
But unfortunately, the warmth
lasted only two days and the ten-
nis rackets were put away in anti-
cipation of the permanent arrival
Iof spring.
Meanwhile, a group of more
serious players, the Wolverine ten-
nis team, was busy practicing
within the consistently warm and
FREE U
FESTIVAL
with the
"Leaves of Grass"
and
"Cat's Cradle"
Union Ballroom
March 28-8-1
Tables to buy or sell crafts.
Bring your toys, your friends,
or anything you want!
FREE !
hDr 1

TOAUTO I.NSURANCE
FOR EVERYONE
CANCELLED REJECTED 0 DECLINED
INSURANCE CERTIFICATES
IMMEDIATELY FOR
1970 LICENSE PLATES
SPECIALIZING IN
FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
I L o Motl ayments I

dry shelter of the IM Bldg. Not
once did they venture outdoors;
as Coach Brian Eisner explained,
"We'll wait until the weather
breaks." Eisner wants to be sure
that his team will be able to play
outdoors everyday before he makes
the switch.
BEING RESTRICTED as they
have been by Ann Arbor's usually
terrible weather, Michigan's po-
tential as a team has not even
been approached. But the season
Baseball c ag dgn
complaint
BOSTON (A) - The National
Labor Relations Board issued a
complaint yesterday against the
American Baseball League, charg-
ing federal labor laws were vio-
lated in the dismissal of umpires
Al Salerno and Bill Valentine.
Joe Cronin, the A.L. president,
said the men were being fired
Sept. 16, 1968 for incompetency. A
trial examiner will hear the case
May 18, according to Albert J.
Hoban, NLRB regional director,
who issued the complaint.
Cronin said Thursday that the
league made a "generous offer"
to reconcile the situation with
the umpires; but that Salerno had
not accepted.
Jack Sheehan, a league spokes-
man, said "both had to accept to-
gether-let it go at that."
At the time of their dismissal,
the umpires were active in estab-
lishing an umpires' union.
"At this hearing," Cronin said
in a statement, "evidence will be
produced to prove that the dis-
missal . . . was in no way related
to their union activities." ,
Salerno, an umpire for seven
years, and Valentine, a six-year
veteran, filed multi-million dollar
damage suits in connection with
their dismissals, but the cases
were dismissed.
AUSTIN
\' G° 6°a
010 0
- I
1209 S. University 663-7151

has already opened as the Wol-
verine netters traveled to the west
coast to play four top flight teams.
Michigan only managed one win
out of the four matches against
a Berkeley team, 5112-3%12. Losses
came to UCLA, USC, and Stan-
ford. UCLA was NCAA champions
last year while USC was runner-
up. But all four California squads
had had the advantage of prac-
ticing outdoors nearly all year
long.
However, according to Coach
Eisner, the Wolverines took the
losses in stride. "It (the spring
trip west) had a positive effect.
It showed us how close we could
come to these teams."
Last year the Michigan squad
emergedas Big Ten Champions
and ranked 15th in the NCAA.
But three starters have been lost
from last season's team.
In addition, the new freshmen
eligibility rule puts the team in
the position of having two year's
worth of players to choose from.
Last year's freshmen as well as
this year's new crop must be evalu-
ated and this brings in an uncer-
tainty factor to Michigan's team
as well as all of its opponents.
EISNER FEELS that "we have a
good chance of winning (the Big
Ten Crown)." But he also warns
that "we're the team they're
shooting for." And this year the
Big Ten is stronger than ever.
Minnesota, MSU, and Indiana are
rated as extremely tough. North-
western, Wisconsin, Iowa and Il-

linois should also be battling for
top honors.
In addition to the conference
teams, Michigan plays a tough
non-conference schedule including
the four California teams and a
top-rate University of -Miami
squad which to date has an 8-1
victory over highly touted SMU.
The seeded positions on Michi-
gan's squad have not been perm-
anently determined. All through
practice the Wolverine players
have been participating in chal-
lenge matches to evaluate indi-
vidual performances. As a result
there has been a lot of variation
in positions.
Coach Eisner expects to tabu-
late all the results from these
matches and analyze them to de-
termine the final seeded spots.
This is expected just prior to the
start of the Big Ten season. At
this point a 11 positions will be
"locked" and are not subject to
change. The reason for locking
in the positions is to channel the
energy previously used to com-
pete within the squad towards the
job of defeating opponents.
MICHIGAN OPENS its h o m e.
season against the Wisconsin
State Titans Monday at 1 p.m.
in t h e IM Building. Wisconsin
State has won the Wisconsin
State Conference championship
for four straight years. However,
the Titans lost last week 9-0 to
Wisconsin. They have no excep-
tionally strong players but are
tough depthwise.
Michigan is also a deep team,

rown
with most of its players pretty
evenly matched. As it stands now
the top four seeded players will
be Junior Mark Conti, No. 1; Sen-
ior John Hainline, No. 2; Sopho-
more Joel Ross, No. 3; and fresh-
man Jim Ott, No. 4. Conti and
Ott look to pair up in No. 1 dou-
bles.
Hainline is expecting to chal-
lenge Conti for the first position
prior to the Wisconsin State
match. In the match Eisner hopes
to play all of his squad, so Conti
may not play doubles if the chal-
lenge match lasts too long.
All four of the top four seeds
have improved greatly to fill the
vacancy left by last year's grad-
uation. Ross has shown marked
improvement over last season
while Hainline has been condi-
tioning all fall and winter and
keeps improving every week.
OTHER PLAYERS who should
help out this year are Freshman
Dick Raverby who has a lot of
experience in national competi-
tion and has the ability to over-
powr opponents, Dan McLaugh-
lin, a Senior transfer student from
San Diego State Jr. Coll., who
didn't lose a match in 1969, and
a Junior, 1Doug McClaury, whose
strength is his power game.
Overall Michigan should per-
form well in d u a l meets and
could very. well repeat as Big Ten
Champs. Despite lacking the spec-
tacular one-two punch of some
teams Michigan looks for an im-
provement on their 1 a s t year's
15th place NCAA finish.

-Daily-Jim Judkis
Mark Conti rifles a serve

,O

I

I*

on this and that
Sports,, the strike and
questions of relevance
eric siegel
IT'S BEEN STRANGE sitting around here the past couple of
days, watcPing sports stories come over the AP and waiting
for reports to come in from around the country on how the
various Wolverine teams have done.
Somehow, sports has seemed just a little irrelevant in light
of the strike and the BAM dmands.
Sports, of course, is seldom thought of in terms of
relevancy. All sports are basically a diversion, a chance to
get away from it all, to have some fun. It's easy to take pride
in the achievements of your favorite team but, when you
come right down to it, whether that team wins or loses or
whether Mr. X sets his record doesn't mean much in the
long run.
Recently, however, there have been discussions between
leaders of BAM and athletic director Don Canham in an attempt
to make the athletic program more relevant to the demands for
increased minority admissions in particular and the black com-
munity of the state in general.
"We've talked about the possibility of holding an alumni-
varsity game, with the proceeds going to the Martin Luther
King scholarship fund," Canham told me over phone yesterday.
According to Canham, the athletic department would try to
bring such former Michiganstars as Cazzie Russell and bring
Rudy Tomjanovich back from San Diego. There is even a pos-
sibility that some alumni from other sports, such as Ron John-
son, might participate in the game.
"This Is really nothing new," Canham said. "Ron (Johnson)
and I have talked about a game like that before.
Canham also said that the athletic department is going
to try to recruit more blacks from Detroit and other nearby
ciies for the summer athletic program run by the depart-
ment. The athletic department has run a summer program
for the past two years for high school and junior high stu-
dents, with several of the coaches running clinics.
Last year, the athletic department began to bus students
in from the inner-city, and Canham said the effort will be
stepped up this year. "We want to help in every way we can,"
Canham said.
The concern of the athletic department with the BAMde-
mands is most welcome, especially in light of the department's
image as a socially unaware and unconcerned institution. But
the concern of the athletic department should not end with the
programs mentioned above.
In the last weeks, several members of the University
community have been questioning the relevancy and desira-
bility of spending huge sums of money, part of which comes
out of the University's general fund monies, to finance an
elaborate and expensive program of intercollegiate athletics
for a large number of non-money making sports.
The reaction to these questions by several members of the
athletic department has been sharp; the points raised have
been rejected out of hand.
This type of reaction seems inappropriate. M[any people as-
sociated with the athletic program here are fond of pointing
out that athletic scholarships have financed the education
of many underprivileged and minority students for years. The
are also fond of pointing out that the Phys. Ed. departmen-
presently has a black enrollment that is far above the 10 pe
cent demanded by BAM for,1973-74.
These points (which are essentially valid although not
foolproof) do not, however, diminish the responsibility of
the athletic department to re-evaluate its budget and, if
necessary, re-order its priorities to see that the BAM de-
mands are assured on a University-wide level. All other
departments of -the University are being called upon to
undertake such a re-ordering and re-evaluation, and the
athletic department should be no exception.

482-9533,
214 E. MICHIGAN, YPSILANTI
ARLAN'S DEPT. STORES
483-8524
234 W MICHIGAN
DOWNTOWN YPSI.

665-3789
2456 STADIUM BLVD.
ANN ARBOR
WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER

-Daily-Jim Jirakis
John Hainline lunges ,for a backhand return
JACKSONVILLE COACH
Joe Williams goes to Furman

I

GREENVILLE, S.C. (A') - Joe
Williams, whose Jacksonville State
University Dolphins were runners
up to UCLA for the NCAA national
basketball championship this year,
was named head coach at Furman
University yesterday.
Both Williams, 36, and Dr. Gor-
don Blackwell, Furman president,
stressed at a news conference that
he was not leaving Jacksonville for
financial gain, but because of his
attachment to Furman acquired in
the 1963-64 season when he was
an assistant coach it the Baptist
supported school.
Howe'er, Williams said another
reason for his decision to leave

Jacksonville was that he was re-
quired to do too many things be-*
side coaching, "pounding pave-
ments, raising money, selling
tickets and handling equipment.
"I wanted to get back to Fur-
man where I can be strictly a
coach,". said Williams.
Williams and Dr. Blackwell de-
clined to discuss terms of his con-
tract, which was signed about
noon.
Jacksonville had a 27-2 record
under Williams' this past season,
and he predicted the Florida1
school will continue to have a suc-
cessful basketball program.
Williams was named to succeed

m

Frank Selvy, who resigned at the
end of the past season after four
years as head coach.
Williams said he had several
boys in mind who might be re-
cruited to Furman but "those boys
already lined up for Jacksonville
University will attend Jacksonville
University. They have a great
team and I want to see the suc-
cessful program at Jacksonville
continued."
BRITISH SOCCER RESULTS
English League
Division 1
Burnley 1, Stoke 1, tie
Manchester City 0, Derby 1
Sunderland 1, Newcastle 1, tie
Tottenham 4, Nottingham Forest 1
Division 2
Bristol City 2, Bolton 2, tie
Oxford 0, Leicester 1
Queen's Park Rangers 0, Carlisle 0, tie
Watford 2, Middlebrough 3
Division 3
Barrow 2, Shrewsbury 0
Bournemouth 2, Walsall 2, tie
Brighton 2, Reading 1
Gillingham 1, Bradford City 1, tie
Luton 2, Rotherma 1
Orient 4, Plymouth 1
Southport 0, Barnsley 1
Torquay 1, Fulham 1, tie
Tranmere 0, Rochidale 0, tie

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