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March 27, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-27

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Page Two.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Fridov, March-27TA9.70

Page TwoTHE MICIGA AL

Friday. MarEh 27.. .1970

I

--MUSIC
Cielidh:
A singing affair

By GARY BALDWIN
Last night at The Ark six of
America's best traditioal folk
singer's began the ceilidh (song
Test) that will continue tdnite
and Saturday. Though some of
the singers met for the first time
yesterday, they sang together and
traded songs like old friends.
As the weekend goes on, and the
performers become more famil-
iar with each other's songs, I ex-
pect the singing will get even
better But one could ask little
more than they offered last
night.
The scheduled performers,
Michael Cooney, Joe Hickerson,
Larry Hanks, Barry O'Neill, and
Roger Renwick were joined by
Bob White (the first of many
singers who will "drop in" over
the course of the weekend) in
a opening instrumental that in-
cluded guitar, penny whistle,
and mandolin.
After that the evening took the
format of a round robin, each
singer doing a song (usually)
similar to the man before him.
Joe Hickerson started things
off with a song called "When
First I Came to Liverpool." The
Assistant Librarian of the Lib-
rary of Congress folk music col-
lection sang with a somewhat
nervous tone of anticipation at
first. But by the end of the song,
there was the usual unity be-
tween the singer and The Ark
audience, and it was clear that
the weekend will not be a dis-
appointment.
Barry O'Neill, nationally known
folk song collector from Ann Ar-
bor, followed with a ballad. Bob
White then sang "Jam on Jer-
ry's Rocks," a Canadian logging
song (the man who dies has a
sweetheart from Saginaw!).
Next was Roger Renwick, doing
a song on the concertina. He
has played at the Ark a couple
of times with O'Neill, and is
studying folklore at UCLA.
I waited anxiously for the next
singer, Larry Hanks, to do his
song. I had heard a lot of good
things about him, but had never
actually heard him sing. I hesi-
tate to comment on his appear-
ance, but his full head of hair
and long blond beard, and mel-
low old Martin gave him a very
appealing presence. He was very
quiet, only speaking a couple4
of times when he wasn't singing.
When Hanks followed the other
logging songs with "Once More
A Lumbering Go," his voice was
even better than I expected;
powerful. and full and clear. One
is surrounded by its fullness, but
not overcome by it.
Michael Cooney, a folklorist
and regular contributor to Sing
Out! magazine, was the most
familiar to the audience (with
the possible exception of 0'-
Neill). Cooney did a version of
"Sail Away, Sail Away" exhib-
iting how he earned his reputa-
tion as one of the country's best
folk singers. Accompanying him-
self on the banjo, Cooney didn't
do anything especially fancy,
but was very impressive with his
clean picking.
The second round was even
better than the first. Hickerson

played a song called "Sundown",
playing the guitar mostly with
his thumb (without a pick)
creating a slight banjo effect.
Barry O'Neill next, doing a
unique Australian song called
"Andy's Guiding Cattle." T h e
round moved on to White, do-
ing Woody Guthrie's "H a r d
Travelin' as everyone joined in
thensinging, Renwick, a fine ver-
sion of "Railroading On the
Great Divide" by Hanks, con-
cluding with a ballad done by
Cooney.
Probably the most interesting
song of the evening was a song
from Newfoundland done by
Renwick in the second round. It
was called "Sweet William's
Ghost" and was the story of the
ghost returning to his L a d y
Margaret. The ghost asks her
to return a cross he had given
her, for she had been untrue.
The lady wants to return with
him to the grave, but the other
lots around him are full, and she
must go on alone.
Undoubtedly stranger songs
than that will be sung yet this
weekend, particularly if t h e
singers should compete w i t h
each other to find one. Collect-
ively, the performers probably
know in the neighborhood of five
thousand songs (probably more).
Last night was only a start.
that this fine evening of music
will be surpassd tonight and
again Saturday. This weekend
the Ark is presenting better folk
music than can be heard any-
where else in the country.
Burkhard Strumpel, senior study.
director with the Survey Research
Center's economic behavior pro-
gram in the Institute for Social
Research at the University, will be
in Germany during May and June
to teach a course on international
economics at Cologne University.
He also will give a series of lec-
tures on behavioral economics at
the University of Mainz and will
talk, on internationally compara-
tive research on consumer behavior
at the University of Amsterdam.
William J. Weichlein, chairman
of the music history and literature
department, has been elected na-
tional president of Pi Kappa
Lambda, national music honor
society.
A member of the society since
1955, Weichlein has been instru-
mental in its publications project
He terms it "one of our most sig-
nificant and tangible contribu-
tions . . . in line with our purpose
of encouraging the creative ap-
proach to the serious study of
music."

The music in politics
T heme: Revolution
e.HERE'S A new type of music on campus. Perhaps its not
melodious in the traditional interpretation of that word-but it
is perfect to those that have created it and participate in it.
The music is revolution. An adventure into mixed media, Old
ashcans become drums and ashtrays take on the aspect of tam-
bourines. The chorus isn't made up of 100 well-chosen voices, but
is, instead, a conglomeration of 2,000 self appointed minstrels.
And every person is committed to the understanding of their song.
A chant for minoritybpresence in the University community.
It is thrilling to be a member of a chorus of people who scream
"Shut it down" to leaders who have belted, "Open it up!' The
words of the few various numbers are simplistic with messages
quickly getting across-"BAM's gonna shut this mother down."
THERE IS some break in the singing (?) for choregraphy con-
sisting of a simple, determined step forward. Hardly anything
complicated. but filled with intensity and meaning. Every now and
then there are a few solos from people ,who have gotten a rhythmn in
their hearts that can't be squelched.
The direction is incredible; hardly varying, yet never boring.
And the scenery is marvelous: old buildings darkened with age
and lack of change is both their architecture and their inhabitants.
Gaping mouths and stern faces line the edges as the cast wends its
way in and through the monstrous structures.
Rarely has there been a cast of such cohesiveness and cam-
eraderie. Taking cues is like talking to the person next door, as
it were.
But this is no ordinary musical -,perhaps it can be called
a musical tragedy. There has been too little applause from the
audience for a group's hard-worked effort.
-LAURIE HARRIS
Arts Pages Editor

W" MM -4
t 0 5F

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MARCH 26 27
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As Black students, faculty and staff of the School of Public
Health, we feel especially concerned about the vital social crises
confronting our nation. There are critical shortages of skilled Black
personnel in all fields and particularly in health.
The Black Action Movement has presented to the University
twelve demands which, if met by firm commitment instead of as
"goals," will enable minority students to contribute with more rele-
vance, to the solutions of these social crises.

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PNAVIIONO COLOR BY DELUME

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Charles R. Kidd
Mary Rose Johnson
Orene Roach
Homer Bowles
Elsa Marshall
Era L. Hill
Robert B. Johnson
Aretha Williams
Peter R. Dortch .
Thelma Walker
Patricia Williams
E. Frank Ellis
Marcia L. Pinkett
Valerie D. Robinson
Leonard E. McCain
E. Robinson
Josiah Brown
Igbo Egwu

George Anderson
Mary H. Rowry
Lois Murphy
Linda Walls
Jean W. Dorsett
Christine Green
James Henderson
D. R. Sebina
Sandy M. Snedecor
Theodis Thompson
Wilma J. Franklin
Karen McCord
Roscoe M. Moore, Jr.
C. Ross McFarland
Frances J. McGuire
Nathaniel Wesley
Marion Whiteside
Bernice Ferguson

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Bernice Adams
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Dorothy Williams
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Bernard Harrell
Edward T. Braye

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The Dean of the School of Public Health was asked to state his support of the
above statement, he declined, presenting his own position.
I support the goals of the Black Action Movement and feel strongly that it is}
desirable for the University to increase the enrollment of Black students. The
progress of our own school toward such a goal makes me feel that it is
attainable.
After reviewing the specific demands of the Black Action Movement and the
University position, I believe that the differences are not great and that with
mutual effort a ten percent Black enrollment figure can indeed be achieved

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