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January 14, 1970 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-14

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M Wednesday, Ja

nuary 14, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

f

rage:vm

. M

defense

crumbles

again,

103 -95

By ERIC SIEGEL
Special To The Daily
COLUMBUS - The Michigan
basketball team's last minute
comeback attempt here last night
fell eight points short, as the Wol-
verines dropped a Big Ten basket-
ball contest to the Ohio State
Buckeyes 103-95.
After trailing the Buckeyes
throughout most of the second
half by eight or more points, the
Wolverines started to mount their
bid for an upset with only 57
seconds on the clock.'
Down 99-91, the Wolverines
drove the length of the court and
Mark Henry dropped in a 15-
footer from the sideline to narrow
the Buckeyes' lead to six.
Then OSU's Jody Finney, who
scored 22,points for the Bucks on
the night, fouled Henry, and Wol-
verines' senior guard hit both of
his .ne-on-one shots, to put
Michigan within four points of
S the Bucks.
That, however, was as close as
the Wolverines came. Dan Fife
fouled Finney, and the 6-3 senior
converted to give the Bucks a
five-point lead.

FIFE TOOK the next shots for
the Wolverines, missing them
both.
Then Jim Cleamons, the Buck-
eyes' hot-shooting forward, put
the game on ice for Buckeyes by
breaking away for a lay-up under-
neath the basket with only four
seconds left and then converting
a free throw attempt at the buzzer.
"We tried to pull it out at the
end," Michigan coach Johnny Orr
commented after the game, "but
we just didn't get any help."
The Wolverines had trouble
throughout the game in getting
help guarding Cleamons, who fin-
ished with 28 points for the night,
banging in 13 of 17 field goal at-
tempts and 2 of ' 4 free throw
tries, and the Buckeyes' other big
man, 6-8 228-pound Dave Soren-
son, who totaled 29 points.
Cleamons repeatedly hit on
long jump shots and Sorenson
was tough too, hitting on short
jumpers and popping in .hooks
with both hands. It was Cleamons
and Sorenson, along with Finney,
who thwarted the Wolverines' at-
tempts to mount a comeback drive
earlier in the game,

ORR HAD 6-4 Rodney Ford on
Cleamons, and the Michigan
coach put his big man, Rudy Tom-
janovich, on Sorenson, and for
awhile, it looked like the Wolver-
ines' defense would be able to
contain the disciplined, hot-shoot-
ing Buckeyes.,
The Wolverines, opening with
their usual fast break offense and
playing a tight man to man de-
fense, raced to a 7-1 lead with
only slightly more than a minute
and half of the game gone.
Tomjanovich who scored 34
points to lead both teams, got six
of Michigan's first seven points.
But then the Buckeyes started
slowing Rudy and the Wolverines,
down. With 12:44 remaining in

daaly
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL DINNER

riod, and that was all for the
Wolverines.
WITH SORENSON scoring on
taps and short jumpers and oc-
casionally keying the Buckeyes
own fast break, OSU outscored
Michigan 14-6 over four minute
period to take a 35-33 lead that
they never relinquished.
. By halftime, the Buckeyes, slow-
ing the Wolverines' down to a
snail's pace had a 5U-43 lead.
Throughout most of the second
part of the first half, the Buck-
eyes, who were in a man-to-man
defense, continually used their 6-
3 forward Dan Andreas to clog up
the middle, tryingto keep Tom-
Tanovich away from the basket.
The Buckeye strategy was pretty

effective, too, as Rudy hit a long
cold spell, failing to score a point
during a nine minute stretch while
the Bucks built up their margin.
Tomianovich stil finished the
half as the Wolverines leading
scorer with 15 points, but the 6-7
forward went only 13 of 29 from
the floor, although he did hit eight
of ten from the free throw line.
In the second half, the Wolver-
ines never got closer than six,
and at one point trailed the Buck-
eyes by 12, 71-59, until they
mounted their last ditch come-
back attempt in the final minutes
of play.
The loss was the Wolverines'
third in their last four games,
and leaving the Maize and Blue
with a 1-3 record ini Big Ten play.

YPSILANTI
This new store carries more trade (non-text) books
than any other in the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area.
Unusual 1970 calendars, thousands of paperbacks,
lots of them used, some hardbacks.
10!% OF
ON ALL BOOKS
Mon.-Thurs.-9-9; Fri.-9-6; Sat.--12:5:30

the first half, the'
was only 23-21.
Michigan then
life, rattling off
points in a row.
But, with 12:01

Wolverines' lead
came briefly to
the next six
remaining,>U

mastermind Fred Taylor assembled
his troops during a time-out pe-

MICHIGAN SURVIVES:

Eastern gymnasts

fall to giant

e thin
We hope

we're interesing-
you will.

Rover turnover

Carter
Ford
Toin anovich
Bleodworth
Fife
Hery
GrabTiec
Hayward
Totals

MICHIGAN
fg ft
4-7 0-1
4-10 4-4
13-29 8-10
s-8 0-a
s-17 1-1
1-4 2-2
0-3 2-2
3-5 0-a
39-83 17-2a

f
3
1
2
1
5
2
0
15

r
4
8
13
5
7
1
1
1
42

tp
8
12'
34
10'
I9
4
2
6
95

Cleam
Andre
Sorens
Barcia
Finney
Smith
Minor

ions 13-17
as 5-7
on 12-22
y 6-9
y 8-15
0-3
Q-I
Totals 44-74

2-4
1-1
5-7
1-1
6-7
a0-
15-2

2
4
4
3
2
0
15

3 28
5 11
8 29
5 13
10 22
00
400
40 103

OHIO STATE

By CHRIS TERAS'
Going into the meet against
Michigan last night in Ypsilanti,
the Eastern -Michigan gymnasts
were out to kill a giant.
Even though the giant had an
off night, he's still alive.
Cast as the giant, the Wolverines
easily downed EMU, 160.25 to
148.1 Though this score is usually
considered to be commendable, it
was some what inferior to the
162.70 mark recorded against Wis-
consin last Saturday.
Huron coach, Mary Johnson,
characterized Michigan as the
giant when he stated after the
meet that, "Michigan is the best
team we will face all year. We
couldn't really .hope to compete
with them. We're three or four
years away from that."
THOUGH HIS SQUAD didn't
even come close to killing any
giants, Johnson did find cause for
some happiness over the meet's

results. "It was our best score all
year," he said.
"I think there were two main
reasons for our score," he explain-
ed'. "One was that we were up for
Michigan. The second is that we've
worked hard so far, and have been
improving steadily."
"But there will be a disappointed
coach if we don't go over 150 the
next time out," he added.
The coach of the giants, on the
other hand, was. subdued despite
the fact that his team easily es-
caped with its life.
LOKEN ALSO admitted that a
decline in the quality of competi-
tion had something to do with his
team's let down. "Though .I hate
to downgrade Eastern,' he quickly
added, "because Marv Johnson
captained our team years ago."
Another reason for the some-
what lowered Michigan score may
have been all-arounder Sid Jensen's
recent illness. "He's been sick with
the stomach flu for about three
days," explained Loken. He didn't

compete in the floor exercise or
vaulting and we missed his score."
Last Saturday, Jensen rated a
9.0 in vaulting and an 8.65
in the floor exercise.
IN TEAM SCORES, the Hurons
had _their best chance of beating
Let down
STATISTICS
VAULTING -- 1. Gura {M), 9.2; 2.
McCurdy (M), 8.95; 3. Huntzicker (M},
8.95.
FLOOR EXERCICE - 1. Huntzicker
(M), 9.0; 2. Black (M), 8.4; 3. McCurdy
(M), 8.3.
SIDE HORSE - 1. Kaziny (M), 9.25;
2. Reilly (E), 8.85; 3. McCurdy (M),
8.8.
RINGS - 1..Jensen (M), 9.1; 2. Mc-
Curdy (M), 9.0; 2. Frowick (M) 9.0.
PARALLEL BARS - 1. Rapper (M),
9.45; 2. Reilly (E), 8.9; 3. Plotkin (M),
8.8.
HIGH BAR - 1. McCurdy (M), 9.3;
2. Howard (M) '9.25; 3. Reilly (E), 8.7.
ALL-AROUND -- 1. McCurdy (M),
52.8; Reilly (E), 51.6; 3. Mills (E),
48.5.
ETEAM TOTALS -.Michigan, 160.25;
Eastern Michigan 148.1.

the de
dCE B C

Bill Cusumano .1

Michigan in the first two events
of the night, the floor exercise
and the vaulting. The difference
was 25.7 to 24.1 and 26.4 to 24.2,
respectively.. From this point on
EMU never came close as the
Wolverines missed the 27.0 goal in
only one of the four following
events, that being a 26.75 in the
parallel bars.

C OtUMBUS - Basketball is actually a very basic game: the
object 'is to simply put the ball in the basket more than
the other guy. Unfortunately for Michigan, Ohio State did just
that to the Wolverines last night..
Such results, however, were almost to be expected before
the contest started. Not that the Buckeyes necessarily have a
better team, but because they happen to possess the best shoot-
ing club in the country. The Bucks showed why they lead the
nation in percentage popping as they blazed the nets to score
on 59.5 per cent. On the other hand, Michigan hit but 47 per
cent. Ergo, Michigan loses.
Simple, isn't it? Since there's obviously nothing more that
can be said I might as well pull out of this grimy city and go
home and get some sleep.
But it's not really all that easy, so I have'to keep writing.
If I don't, some. bright. fan will. ask what .would happen if
Michigan took so many more shots than Ohio State to make
the percentage factor irrelevant.
It's a very good point, and in fact, Michigan did take
more shots (not enough, though). So the obvious con-
elusion is that the best way to win is to stop your opponent
from shooting at all. Or, if that can't be done, at least
drastically cut down the number.
Now we have finally come to the crux of the matter. How
is such a thing accomplished? The answer is through prevention
of turnovers, and therein, friends, lies the troubles of the Wol-
verines.
Michigan gave the ball up without getting a shot off 25
times by unofficial count. The odds are that the number was
even higher. The Wolverines have the unfortunate habit of
giving the ball away when there is no need to. The simple truth
is that at times they exhibit no basketball sense.
When the Wolverine break is rolling few teams can stop it.
The key to its success, though, is that it must be controlled.
Fastbreaking and turnovers are natural partners because of the
rapid movement and quick passing that are needed to make
the break an effective weapon. Thus, a team must make the
break a calculated play. The players have to keep running so
that every opportunity can be grabbed, but they must also
recognize when there is no good chance for a successful break.
The latter aspect of the running game is, unfortunately,
the only deficiency which Michigan possesses in its operation
of the fast break. The failures in such instances far outnumber
the successes. As a result, they lose the ball far too often.
Last night's game proved that a controlled Michigan run-
ning game is quite capable of beating anyone around. The
Bucks are no slouches but the Wolverines were up 29-21 in the
first half and looking to stretch it out.
Then disaster struck. Bad shots, bad passes, violations, no
chances to shoot at all. By halftime the count read 50-43 and
it was Ohio State who was on top, never to be headed again. It
looked like a great Buck comeback and in some senses it was,
but the actual fact was that Michigan had lost control of its
greyhound offense.
Coach John Orr lamented on the change in play when
he spoke to the press after the game, "I think in the first
half we broke away from our offense," he said. "That's when
they caught us. Our guards had shots and didn't take them.
Instead they tried to dump off. I don't know why they did
that."
The Wolverines had lost control 'of their pattern and
couldn't adjust. Passes that had formally existed no longer did,
but they were still attempted. What seemed to occur in many
cases was indecisiveness. People would be caught not knowing
whether to shoot or pass. Usually the Bucks got the ball when
'that happened.
One particular offender was Dan Fife. Despite 19 points
Fife had a miserable evening, being called for traveling numerous
times and making several other errors. Three times Fife was
caught in the air not knowing what to do with the ball and was
forced to try a dribble. Such a maneuver is illegal. Once a played
goes into the air he must either shoot or pass. Fife was in a posi-
tion to do neither.
A cardinal rule of basketball is not to caught in the air
with nothing to do. In other words, don't be all dressed up and
have no place to play; keep the situation under control.
This Michigan failed to do and it caused the Wolverines to
drop a game they could have won.
Now, to go back to questions and answers, what is the solu-
tion? There are no obvious answers since the problem is not
always prevalent. At times Michigan is very controlled and
during those periods the break is a thing very beautiful to behold.
It is basketball at its best. Quick and moving.

Suspension of San Jose State
track team to face court test

SAN JOSE, Calif. (A) - The
acting president of San Jose State
College said yesterday he was con-
sidering the possibility of suing
the Nationa vCollegiate Athletic
Association over the one-year sus-
pension of the school's track team.
"On behalf of the college," sai(
Acting President Hobart W. Burns
in a prepared statement, "I am
investigating with legal counsel
the possibilities of seeking justice
through litigation in the civil
courts."
The suspension of San Jose,
reigning NCAA track champion,
prohibits the school from com-
peting in the national organiza-
tion's championship meet this
year.
The suspension stems from the
participation of several San Jose
athletes in a track meet that was
later condemned by the NCAA as
uncertified. But Burns has said he
thinks the suspension is related
to John Carlos' gloved-fist dem-
onstration at the 1968 Olympic
Games in Mexico City.
Burns says that several other
schools competed in the meet in
question, which was held in
Southern California last year, and
that none of them was suspended.
A request by San Jose that the
NCAA reconsider its appeal at its
current meeting in Washington
has been denied.
"In our appeal to the NCAA in
which we were prepared with new
,"-:
Blboar d a
The Michigan Sports Clubs
Association is holding a meet-
ing today at 8:00 p.m. in room
3524 of the Student Activities
Building.

evidence," said Burns, "we hoped
to get either a reversal of the
suspension or a rehearing on all
the relevant facts.
"At the very least we believe
we 'are entitled to know why San
Jose State College alone, of all
the colleges and universities which
apparently violated the same rule
at the same time and the same
place, was singled out for punish-
ment and why the punishment
was so severe."
Earlier, Burns had said, "This
action against San Jose State may
have been in part a prejudicial
reaction to John Carlos' raised-
fist gesture at the recent Olympic
Games."
Carlos, the world record-hold-
ing sprinter, was a member of the
Scores
PRO BASKETBALL
Detroit 115, San Francisco 102
Boston 111, seattle 102
Philadelphia 136, Atlanta 105
Milwaukee 112, Cincinnati 92
AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information calf
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips/Day

San Jose track team when it won
the NCAA championship and was
one of the athletes who competed
in the disputed meet last year. At
the time,. San Jose officials said
they had been told the meet was
sanctioned by the NCAA. .
In Washington, Walter Byers,
Executive Director of the NCAA,
said he would have no comment
regarding San Jose's statement
that it may sue the NCAA.
ir ,

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2nd Floor, Student Publications Bldg.
420Maynard
Questions-Ron Brasch, 769-7358

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UOFM
TUTORIAL
PROJECT
urgently needs tutors
for expanding program
at Maxey Boys Train-
ing School.
To volunteer, come to
the Tutorial 0 f f i c e,
2547 S.A.B., or call
763-3548; Jim John-
son at 663-0267; or
Jim Grage at 665-
0084.

Daily Classijieds
Bring Results

SUMMER CHARTER
FLIGHT NO. 1: Windsor to London
Brussels to Windsor
AIR CANADA JET
FLIGHT NO. 2: Detroit to London
Pris to Detroit
TWA JET
FLIGHT NO. 3: Windsor to London
Brussels to Windsor
AI R CANADA JET
' Sponsored by the University of Michigan

FLIGHTS

I

II '

~RAD/ CA L FILM SER/ ES
presents
SALT OF THE EARTH
Directed by: HERBERT BIBERMAN
Starring: ROSAURA REVUELTAS, JUAN CHACON
The Radical Film Series screened SALT OF THE EARTH on October 1th ... Moratorium Day.
Due to all the events of that day, only a few people saw it. Since we consider it one of the
most significant radical films ever made in America, "perhaps the first American peoples'
film" (Leviathan,) we've decided to show it again.
SALT OF THE EARTH portrays the bitter struggle of New Mexican zinc miners and their
families for decent working and living conditions. What begins as a walkout over safety
conditions, ends in an understanding of the total dimensions of control that the mining com-
pany holds over their lives. The miner s wives gain insight into their own source of oppression
as they help to win at least a temporary victory in the labor struggle and begin to change their
family and community roles.
"Salt of the Earth is an American movie about workers, which fact alone makes it unusual.
The idea that workers are people, and have conflicts and problems worthy of attention, has
never impressed the American film industry.. , "
-Canadian Broadcasting Company
Salt of the Earth was made in the midst of the McCarthy repression by Herbert Biberman, one
of "the Hollywood unfriendly ten"-,who served a jail term for refusing to testify before
r HUAC in 1947. The film industry and the Federal Government did everything in their power
to halt production of the film. Their comments are perhaps its best recommendation:

Nay 3
,dune I
May 7
June 26

$210.00

$210.00

May 6
August 16

$215.00

ONLY Charters from the campus which are regularly scheduled
I.A.T.A. Carriers
' First Class Service; Free, open bar
' ' Possible rebate if plane fills
', * Sponsored by UAC-a NON-profit organization
' Returns from the Continent
Sign Up at the UAC Travel Committee Desk, UAC Offices, 2nd Floor Union

'rAA Ai t' _.. YAA i'1 A'?

El

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