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March 24, 1970 - Image 11

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-24

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Tuesday, March 24, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eleven

Tuesday, March 24, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Eleven

NBI
NEW YORK W) - Bob Lanier,
a 6-foot-11 agile giant, proved the
importance of the big man, as ex-
pected, yesterday when Detroit
ma ia him the No. 1 selection in
the National Basketball Associa-
tion's college draft while Pete
Maravich surprisingly was picked
third by Atlanta.
General Manager Ed Coil of the
Pistons' selected Lanier via a 17-1
city telephone hookup, and now
must outbid the New York Nets of
the American Basketball Associa-

drafts

Lanier

first,

Rudy

second

tion for the St. Bonaventure All-
American.
"I don't know yet who I'll sign
with," said Lanier, who is recover-
ing from knee surgery after an in-
jury suffered in the recent NCAA
championship tournament. Detroit
reportedly had offered the 265-
pounder a $1.5 million package,
while the Nets are supposed to
have made a $1.2 million offer.
Lanier earlier had been report-
ed decided on the NBA and the
I Pistons, who won the No. 1 pick

from San Diego by finishing last
in the Eastern Division and then
winning a toss of the coin from
San Diego, the last place team in
the West.
San Diego, probably influenced
by the huge salary it would have to
pay Maravich and the doubt that
it could sign him anyway, chose
to select 6-7 Rudy Tomianovich of
Michigan as the second pick. The
big forward, who average almost
30 points and 15 rebounds p e r
game, was believed favoring the
NBA.
Then Atlanta, which then re-j
vealed that it had acquired S a n
Francisco's pick - reportedly in
payment for giving the Warriors
the rights to Zelmo Beaty -
went for Maravich, major college
basketball's all-time high scorer.
Although Pistol Pete, a , 6-5
three-time All-American at Louis-
iana State, was believed favoring
Carolina of the ABA, Atlanta ob-
viously felt it had a chance by
offering him an NBA team in the
South.
"IT CAME as a blessing because
Pete really loves the South," said
his father, Press Maravich, who
coaches LSU.
"I knew Detroit would take Lan-
ier. They already have two great
guards and they needed a big guy.
I knew San Diego needed a for-
ward real bad. Then I learned
through the grapevine that At-
lanta had San Francisco's first-
round draft choice."
Los Angeles of the ABA had
made Tomjanovich its first round
pick and Maravich was the top
choice, by Carolina,
Boston, picking fourth in the
NBA, went for Dave Cowens of

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL ALTERMAN
Florida State, and the fourth best
rebounder in the country, Cincin-
nati picked Sam Lacey of New
Mexico State, a 6-10 center.
Seattle chose, Cincinnati's 6-9 Jim
Ard and Cleveland took John
Johnson, Iowa's 6-7 forward, as six
of the first seven selections were
big men.
Jeff Petrie, a Princeton guard,
was picked by Portland; Balti-
more, with a pick acquired from
Buffalo, took 6-9 George Johnson
ofStephen F."Austin; and Phoenix
selected 6-9 Greg Howard of New
Mexico, who played this year in
Italy.
In the rest of the first round,
Chicago took guard Jimmy Col-
lins of New Mexico State; Phila-
delphia picked Al Henry of Wis-
consin; Los Angeles chose Jim Mc-
Millian of Columbia, Atlanta pick-
ed UCLA guard John Vallely;t
Buffalo, taking Baltimore's pick,
took John Hummer of Princeton;,
Milwaukee selected Gary Freeman
of Oregon State and New York
took Mike Price of Illinois.
ALL-AMERICAN Calvin Mur-
phy, of Niagara, only 5-10, was the
first pick in the second round,
-hosen by San Diego.
A number of college basketball's
top names were missing until the
final rounds of the 10-round, 170-
player'draft because they already
have been signed by the ABA,
which held a four round secret
draft in January and then com-
pleted its draft yesterday.

By PHIL HERTZ
Associate Sports Editor
"I was really surprised that I
went that early" was Michigan's
All-American Rudy Tomjanovich's
comment yesterday afternoon fol-
lowing his selection by the San
Diego Rockets in the opening,
round of the National Basketball
Association's college draft.
Tomjanovich, the 6-8 record
breaker from Hamtramck, was the
second player drafted, with only,
big Bob Lanier, 6-11 St. Bona-
venture pivotman (by the Detroit
Pistons) to go before him. He was
selected ahead of such notables as
Louisiana's State's Pete Maravich
and New Mexico's State's Sam
Lacey.
THE WOLVERINE captain, who
rewrote the Michigan record bookt
during his three varsity cam-
paigns, said "I was really honored

at being taken so early in the
draft."
Tomianovich. who was also a
first round selection of the Amer-
ican Basketball Association's Los
Angeles Stars, indicated pleasure
at going to San Diego. "I think
San Diego is a great town and
great place to play."
Rumors prior to yesterday's
draft, held by a telephone linkup,
had indicated a strong desire on
the part of Tomjanovich to play
for his hometown Detroit Piston
ball club, but the Big T scoffed at
this story, "There have been a lot
of stories about my wanting to
play in Detroit. I'd like to play
there, but it also would be nice to
i get away for a change."
TOMJANOVICH, who is t h e
leading rebounder in Wolverine
cage history and the number two
scorer to Cazzie Russell, said, "I
haven't signed yet," but in re-
sponse to a question he indicated
he expects to play in San Diego
next year, "We're in the process
of working out the details now."
The Wolverine All-American al-
so said, "I think Los Angeles would
be a great place to play, but the
ABA's offer wasn't quite as good
as the NBA's."

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
Rudy Tom janovich (45)

TOP TWO DRAFTEES:
ABA, poises to pluck plums

NEW YORK (AP) - With nine
college seniors already in the fold,
the three-year-old American Bas-
ketball Association set its sights
yesterday on the two biggest plums
in this year's draft-Pete Mara-
vich and Bob Lanier.
"I like the odds of getting Mar-
avich better than Lanier," Com-
missioner Jack Dolph confessed
after the- ABA completed the last
eight rounds of its draft yester-

day. The first four rounds were
held in January and the -ABA
signed a number of All-Americans
last week.
The rival National Basketball
Association held its entire 10-
round draft yesterday.
Maravich's father, P r e s s, his
coach at Louisiana State, said his
high-scoring son would make no
decision for several weeks while
,his advisor mulls over whopping

offers from both the Carolina
Cougars of the ABA and the NBA's
Atlanta Hawks.
L a n i e r, St. Bonaventure's 6-
foot-11 center, reportedly was
committed to the NBA--he went
to Detroit as the league's No. 1
pick-and was said to be getting
a $1.5 million package.
"We rate Pete Maravich in a
class by himself as a gate attrac-
tion," said Dolph. "We expect him
to be instrumental in selling
tickets, perhaps more so than any
basketball player in the past."

!
3
G
l
x
4
L
r
a
r

Tomjanovich was the only Mich-
igan cager drafted yesterday; how-
ever, three other Big Ten cagers
were selected in the opening round
of the NBA draft. Cleveland took
Iowa's John Johnson, Philadelphia
took Wisconsin's Al Henry, an d
New York chose Mike Price. Ano-
other player familiar to local sport
fans, Eastern Michigan's E a r l e
Higgins, was taken in the third
round by San Francisco.
A fifth Big Ten player,.Purdue's
Rick Mount, would probably have
been a first round selection in the
NBA too; however, he had already
signed with the ABA's Indiana
Pacers.

Associated Press
Pete Maravich and Bob Laniert

Athletic Board Candidate

BIG EIGHTH:

(Editor's Note: Mike Keller, a de-
fensive end on last year's football
team, is running unopposed for the
vacant student seat on the Board
in Control of Intercollegiate Ath-
letics.)

Arizona dumps batsmen

interest. I know you can't work
for improvement in something
you know nothing about. Be-
cause of my close affiliation
with Michigan athletics I feel
I can represent the desires of
the students.:

Dolph called the ABA draft a
"resounding success" and said the
league "is not going to fold if wt
don't sign Maravich and Lanier."

t Special To The Daily
TUCSON - If yesterday's base-
ball game between the Wolverines
and the Arizona Wildcats had last-
ed only seven innings, it could
have been described as a close con-
test. Unfortunately, the game went
the full nine innings and the final
results showed the Wolverines be-
ing trounced 10-2.
The Wolverines drew blood in the
second inning when first baseman
Bob Bower and right fielder Leon
Roberts drew walks. Tim Kocolski
was hit by a pitch to load the
bases. Then second baseman Brian
Balaze hit into a force play at
the same time driving Bower across
home plate.
The Wolverines scored their se-
cond run in the sixth inning when
M MICHIGAN

catcher Tom Lundstedt slammed a
drive over the left field fence, 385
feet away.
Ed Boyson pitched a strong
game for the first seven innings asj
he allowed the Wildcats only
three runs. However, the r o o f
fell in during the eighth as t h e
Wildcats pushed over seven runs.
The Arizona squad needed o n 1 y
three hits during this time as the
Wolverines made many costly mis-
takes. The first two men to come
to bat in that inning were safe
on errors and later a dropped f 1 y
ball allowed three more runs to
score. Boyson and Tom Fleszar,

who relieved him, contributed to
their own downfall by giving up a
walk, hitting two batters and toss-
ing a wild pitch.
Boyson took the loss for Michi-
gan and Dick Morache, who went
most of the way for Arizona was
given credit for the victory. The
Wolverines will try to salvage
something from their Western trip
when they meet the Wildcats in a
single game today. The victory
pushed Arizona's record for the
season to 16-4. The Wolverines'
mark is now 0-4 as they h a v e
dropped their first games to the
powerful Wildcats.

Huggers score decisive wins,
foresee prosperous season

IL

FFF-t

Carrow (3b)
Fife (cf)
Lundstedt (c)
Kettinger (If)
Bower (1b)
Roberts (rf)
Kogoloski (ss)
Buss (rf)
Balaze (2b)
Mulvihill (ph)
Boyson (p)
Fleszar (p)
Bowen (p)
Driscoll (2b)
Williams (3b)
Campos (ph)
Ballard (3b)
Mikulic (f)
Rokey (c),
Lodge (If)
Bowman (lb)
Trest (c)
Jacomy (ss)
Formille (p)
Morache (F)
Chields (p),
Direks (ph)
O'Brien (ph)
Berger (ph)

AB
5
5
3
3
3
2+
3
0
3
1
3
0
0
s 31
A

Totals
ARIZON

AB'
4
3
1
0
5
4
4
4
5
4
0
1
0
Totals 37

H
1
0
1
I
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
J
H
2
2
0
0a
2j
11
1t
0
2
0
0
0
0
12

By AL SHACKELFORD
Michigan's talented rugby teams
each scored an impressive spring,
season-opening win over the week-'
end as the Blues clobbered Penn
State 15-5 while the Golds gave
Windsor a convincing 11-3 drub-
bing.
Outstanding play by Ross Vick-
ers led the Golds to their Satur-
day win at Windsor. Vickers open-
ed the scoring in the second half
with a penalty kick and then,
after Windsor had knotted the
score, came back with another to
send the Wolverines winging to-
ward their victory.
RUGBY COACH Dr. John Rob-
son praised the find play of team
captain Bill Schnure in the game

1
0
1
0
0
0
a
0
0
19

and added that "our new kidsper-
'formed very well."
The Wolverine Blue team gave
nearly a hundred hardy fans a
good show Sunday on a wet Ferry
Field as they drubbed the Nittany
Lions, rated "one of the best teams
in the East" by team captain
Peter Swift.
The Blues jumped out in front
early with a good three quarter
movement leading to a try by
Vern Plato. A penalty kick by
Cleland Child and an opportun-
ist try upped the score to 9-0 at
halftime, and the stunned Penn
State ruggers, hit by the swift
Wolverine whirlwind, could not
come back.
Bob Reid and Joel Penoyar
added tries in the second half to
ice Michigan's victory.
"It was a fast, good game," re-
marked Coach Robson. "We played
terrific rugby." He added that the
Blues play was deficient only in
that they missed seven shots in
the game.
The double win vertified pre-
s e a s o n expectations of great
things for this year's ruggers.
"WE LOST some good people
m %ME00mmmuNm

I

III

Davis Cup bars S. Africans* -
courts deciding on Pilots
By The Associated Press 1
LONDON-South Africa was barred from the 1970 Davis Cup
tennis competition yesterday because of its racial policies, leaving a
note of bitterness in international tennis.
The action was led by the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association and
came as a direct result of the refusal of South Africa to grant a visa
to Arthur Ashe, Jr., American Negro star, for the South African
Championships.
SEATTLE-Whether the Seattle Pilots baseball team moves to
Milwaukee is up to a pair of courts today, one a bench on bankruptcy
and the other already indicating it sees no future for the club here.
Superior Court Judge James W. Mifflin recessed to 9:30 a.m.
today his hearing on whether to grant a temporary injunction pre-
venting the sale and transfer of the American League club.
NEW YORK-The Chicago Bulls won a coin toss with the Phoenix
Suns yesterday and gained recognition as the third-place finishers
in the Western Division of the National Basketball Association.
BUFFALO, N.Y.-Veteran quarterback Jack Kemp of the Buffalo
Bills announced yesterday he would seek Republican nomination for
the House but' refused to say flatly that he is ending his football
career.

U

..
..
..

Scores

'

EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Yesterday's. Results
Cincinnati 7, Los Angeles 3
Houston 3, Boston 2 E E i H ~ i
New York N 4, St. Louis 3
Philadelphia 4, New York NB 3
Pittsburgh 17, Kansas City 7 Greatly Reduced in Price
San Diego 8, Oakland 3
Washington 2, Baltimore o
Minnsota4, hicao AThousands of books from 5C up!
New York A 5, Detroit 2
Seattle 5, California 3
Montreal 10, Atlanta 7
FRESHMEN
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