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March 24, 1970 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-24

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesdov. March 4. 1970

PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT

Tiiesnv Anrcl 34 Q7I

LS&A

GOVERNMENT

ELECTIONS

s

MARCH

24-25

THREE SLATES FOR PRES.-VP

11. CANDIDATES FOR 10 COUNCIL SEATS

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Af .l~a vidC
Brand
-for President
Brian
Ford,
--for Vice-President
PLATFORM
ENCOURAGES SUPPRESSION.OF ONE'S CREATIVITY AND FOSTERS
ALIENATION FROM OUR INSTiUTION, OUR FELLOW STUDENTS,
AND OURSELVES B YOVER EMPHASIS OF EXTERNAL, SINGLE-GOAL
DIRECTED ACTIVITY. WE, DAVID BRAND AND BRIAN FORD, RE-
SOLVE TO IMPLEMENT THE FOLLOWING PROGRAM OF REVISION
IN THE LITERARY COLLEGE:
FIELD STUDY. The University must realize that education is not limited to
the classroom. The literary college must establish accredited Field Study terms
during which a student could spend a term outside the regular institution in an
activity of his own interest and design.
FREE UNIVERSITY Recognizing the validity and value of peer group learn-
ing, the college must incorporate the Free University into its curriculum structure
and allow' members of the University community to learn and teach materials out-
side the catalogued disciplines.
PASS/FAIL. The educational value of having the pass/fail option available
for all courses has been repeatedly demonstrated, yet the lit school has yet' to
institute this program, as it must.
EDUCATIONAL PRIORITY. A teacher's main concern must be their st dents
and their course material, not his research.1
STUDENT FACULTY COUNCIL. Recognizing the college as a student-faculty
community, the ruling body of the college should be a council composed of equal
numbers of students and faculty members (including teaching fellows).
TENURE. Because students are the best judges of professors' teaching ef-
fectiveness,- they should sit with equal vote on all tenure committees and on com-
mittees established to review the teaching effectiveness of faculty members
DISCIPLINE.. Students should not be forced to follow regulations they have
not approved. No student should suffer academic penalties for non-academic offenses.
Students should be judged by their peers for non-academic offenses and by faculty-
student boards for academic pffenses.
DEPARTMENTAL STUDENT UNIONS. We strongly encourage students in
the various department to organize themselves and press for change through the
department and through the student assembly.
AS A FUNDAMENTAL INSTITUTION OF AMERICAN SOCIETY, THE UNI-
VERSITY SHOULD ACT TO INITIATE AND SUSTAIN SOCIETAL CHANGES THAT
WILL PRODUCE THE KIND OF SOCIETY STUDENTS AND FACULTY DESIRE.
THE LITERARY COLLEGE SHOULD ADOPT THE BLACK ACTION
MOVEMENT DEMANDS, FORMULATE A POLICY OF SELECTIVE CAM-
PUS RECRUITING, AND ENCOURAGE RESEARCH ON CURRENT SO-
CIL PROBLEMS.

for President
s Andrew
Hoff man
-for Vice-President
PLATFORM STATEMENT
GERALD COLE, PRESIDENT, ANDREW HOFFMAN, VICE PRESIDENT
Within the next few months, the role of student government within the LSA
College will be significantly altered; what has traditionally been an informal arrange-
ment between students and faculty will be organized into a broaddly based, inde-
pendent Student Government. Because of the unique structure of this Government
and because of its key position within the University we feel that this first election
will be of primary importance to the future of this developing form of Student Gov-
ernment at the University. The people elected this semester will define the position
that this government will take within the College and the University.
Student control over students' personal and academic lives is the primary
goal of the LSA Student Government. As members of the LSA Student Assembly,
we fought for and won student parity on the College Administrative Board and the
Academic Hearing Board. This was the first important step in guaranteeing the
representation of student interest on these two bodies that directly affect students'
academic careers. However, the issue of non-academic discipline is yet to be resolved.
The new LSA-SG must see that the all-student, non-academic Judiciary Board that
is provided for in te new constitution becomes an officially recognized, effectively
functioning organ o? the new Student Government. The Parsons case clearly demon-
strates the need for .such a judiciary body: students must never be left dangling
over a pit of administrative haggling, suspended by the frail logic of expediency.
In this regard, we will continue our strenuous efforts to establish a joint
LSA Stud.ent-Faculty Council which will oversee the entire functioning of the Lit
School. Through the establishment of the College Assembly, we will also continue
the process of building effective student commiteees within all the departments of
the College. Wefeel that this dual approach is the most effective means of gaining
student access to such traditonally secretive processes as budget control, tenure, and
admissions policies of the College. An "open exchapge of ideas" regarding budgetary
priorities is longf overdue; the LSA-SG should support the Radical College in its
efforts to unscramble the University's murky budget.
As the representative voice of the LSA student body, the Government could
call for the much needed open forums on such crucial issues as Black enrollment
and recruitment policies. If class time can be cancelled for discussions at its elitist
convocations, the same courtesy should also be provided for the serious examination
of its pressing controversies. In essence, we believe that the government will have
the legitimacy, and hence the right to call upon the college, and the University and
the College to significantly alter its priorities, accede to the Black's demands, in-
volving all members of the academic community in those decisions that directly
effect them; and developing its social responsibilities to all members of that com-
munity.

Bob
-for President
t- Ray
Lililelon
-for Vice-President
NELSON: SGC MEMBER-5 TERMS L.S.&.A. STUDENT ASSEMBLY
CO-AUTHOR L.S.&.A. STUDENT GOV'T. CONSTITUTION
LITTLETON: BLACK STUDENT UNION
The College is a stagnant academic body. The decision-making structure
overrepresents the interests of the faculty and virtually excludes those of the students.
That structure and an acute fear of change and loss of power by many faculty
members results in improvements that are urgenly needed not being made. We pro-
post both major changes in the decision-making structure of the College and
needed changes in policies that the student government shtuld immediately begin to
work for.
COLLEGE GOVERNMENT.
1. A student-faculty council should be the primary college governing body.
2. All College committees should have parity student representation, especially
the Executive and curriculum committees and the Administrative Board.
3. Any non-academic rules should be made only by the student government
and cases heard only before an all-student judiciary with due process and appeal.
4. Decision-making on the departmental level should be on a parity basis.
MINORITY ADMISSIONS. We support the demands of the Black Action
Movement. Much should be done at the College level. L.S.&A. should begin imme-
diately planning courses designed for students with high ability and low grade
points. We plan a vigorous look at the scholarships presently offered. An expanded
recruiting program should be undertaken.
COUNSELING. Academic \ounseling needs much improvement. Full-time
professional counselors for underclassmen and more student counseling are needed.
STUDENT RECORD. The College must guarantee responsible handling of
a student's academic records. And students should be able to see their records.
FACULTY. Recruitment, selection, and tenure decisions should be made on
a parity basis. Teaching ability should become the most important criteria. The
College should recruit both minority and women faculty.
PASS-FAIL REQUIREMENTS. The College like the Medical School should
greatly expand pass-fail. Language and distribution requirements should be abolished.
DEPARTMENTAL COMMITTEES. The student government should work at es-
tablishing student committees in every department and aid existing committees.
EXCHANGE AND WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS. The College should initiate
exchange programs with other universities and a work-study program.
INNOVATION. The student government should lead the way in turning the
College from a stagnant academic body to one of experimentation. The College should
consider, for example, expansion of the Residential College concept, seminars for
freshmen, and courses emphasizing the many world problems.

V

Ut

EDUCATIONAL ACTION COMMITTEE

The candidates of the Educational Action Committee
Bob Black, Richard Ross and Larry Markowitz-first
heard of the old LSA Assembly when it abolished itself.
For the government of the largest college on campus to
commit suicide is absurd: we are concerned with making
the new LSA Student Government more responsive and
relevant to student needs than the old one. Without an
active, effective student government, every significant
decision. will be made, in default, exclusively by the fa-
culty. Specifically we support the following policies for
the Executive Council:
.1) The abolition of the distribution requirements.
We accept the philosophy that everyone should expose
himself to a range of disciplines, but we see no educa-
tional benefit in imposing it by force. Most students sa-

tisfy most of the requirements simply by pursuing their
own interests; the "broadening" provided by one or two
introductory courses in any subject is slight. No single
formula is best for all students.
2) Increased use of nontraditional educational meth-
ods. Despite a severe shortage of classroom space, 'the
faculty seems chained to the lecture-recitation style of
teaching. We believe that some subjects are better treat-
ed through directed reading, independent study and oth-
er flexible approaches-and not only at the upper-class
level.
3) Support for special programs. Since different stu-
dents have different educational needs and wants, we
support special curricula like the Honors Program, Pilot
Program and Residential College.
4) Increased black admissions. The literary college

is statistically the most lily-white college on campus:
this is intolerable and we will fight to increase black ad-
missions.
5) An all-student judiciary for all non-academic
cases involving students. The SGC-CSJ Constitution
guarantees every student due process and trial by his
peers in non-academic cases; when the college represses
such rights, as in the Parsons case, mistakes are likely
and injustice is inevitable.
Underlying our proposals is the conviction that stu-
dents are entitled by right to control matters which ex-
clusively concern them, and to influence all decisions
which substantially affect them. We were uninvolved in
the factional struggles of the old LSA government; we
want to start anew and build a government that never
grows out of touch with the students it serves.

Bob

Larry
Markowitz

Richard

A,

Black

Ross

A

BLUE PANTHER PARTY

The members of the Blue Panther Party strongly
support the L.S.A. Assembly's proposed constitution, and
urge members of the L.S.&A. school to ratify this con-
stitution in the upcoming election. The constitution is
definitely a step forward in giving students a say in
their own education.
What do we wish to accomplish if elected to L.S.A.
Council?
First of all, on an academic level, the Blue Panthers
would work for an end to general language requirements
and distribution requirements. It seems odd to us that
students should pay money to go to school only to let the
school tell them that they must take specific courses
they don't care for. The myth of the "well-rounded edu-
cation" is out of date. Students of today have a well-
rounded education when they leave high school, and,
for the most nrt have a good idea of what they want to

Thirdly, we strongly support the BAM's demands for
increased black enrollment, Though a University-wide
proposal, this most strongly affects the L.S.&A. school,
and we feel that L.S.A. should take a leading role in sup-
porting these demands. It is our responsibility to help
educate as many blacks as possible, including, if neces-
sary, lowering admission standards for prospective black
students.
It seems clear to us that in the future, students must
have more say in the area of tenure. Students should
have, we feel, decision-making power in this area rather
than just advisory power. Students know best which pro-
fessors fill their needs and which don't meet up to their
standards.
Finally, we feel that students should also hold more

You, the student body of L.S.A., have, in the new
proposed constitution and current elections, a unique
chance to achieve a responsive student government that
will not only insure the protection of students' rights and
act as a strong voice for student demands, but also will
think up new ideas and initiate new action for the bet-
terment of our education, society and environment. This
government's potential is only limited by the amount of
creativity and energy vested in its members and the
strength of your commitment and interest. I feel th4t I
am a student who will bring to this government that
necessary energy and creativity. If you have questions,
call 769-2526.
GOVERNMENT-1 THE RATIFICATION OF THE
PROPOSED CONSTITUTION. 2-The establishiment of
a Student-Faculty.Board (parity) with binding decisions
on the Dean's office subject only to veto by either the
Studentt Executive Committee or the Faculty Assembly.
3-The forming of a sorely needed L.S.A. Student Judi-
ciary.

4

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