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March 22, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Y

III

NATIONAL ENERAL CORPORATION
NOW FOX EASTERNTHEATRES i
SHOW~ING 'FOR VLLa
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769-1300

TIMES
1:30-4:00
6:45-9:20

CHILDREN'SPRICE AT ALL SHOWS

Ding!
Avivid
experience.
thrilling! A
cliffhanger
in space!"
-LA.Times

.. mClmiaPcue

TEMPLE BETH EMETH (Reform)
is now recruiting teachers for its
Religious (Sunday) and Hebrew School
Students, Teachers, and Student Wives
are invited to apply
Applications can be obtained by callinq:
R. S. Tikofsky, 662-9319 or
Mrs. M. Reinhart, 663-5017
Interviews will be held March 28 (Sat.)

page three
Sunday, March 22, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

al4c

mtr4t.gan

aaiIy

NO EVENING SHOWS-TUES., MARCH 24
"TRIBUTETO KING-MONTGOMERY TO MEMPHIS"
ONE SHOWING-8:0 P.M.LONLY
TIHEt EXECUTIVE COUNCIL

I

i

the
news togday
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Nixon may limit

F

I

i

I

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT-
Classic Crafts Corp. is now accepting applications for
its summer college program. Positions available as
company representative.
Challengingopportunity for ambitious individual
who enjoys travel. Must have use of car.
Salary: $2000 for summer with all expenses paid.
Mr. Eshleman will be interviewing at the
Summer Placement Office, 212 SAB, on
Thursday, March 26th-10 A.M. to 5 P.M.
PHONE OR STOP BY FOR APPOINTMENT

planes to

Israel

Of
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES
CENTER
STRONGLY SUPPORTS THE
BLACK ACTION MOVEMENT
and
Student Strike
We Feel Their Demands Are Just
and Should Be Met

1--

I

i

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
presents
THE

THE CZECHOSLOVAKIAN COMMUNIST PARTY disclosed
yesterday it has removed its former leader Alexander Dubcek
from active party ranks.
The demotions of Dubcek and associate Josef Smrkovsky were
coupled with renewed public denunciation of the leading reformers of
the 1968 "Prague spring" - the Dubcek liberal movement crushed by
Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in August of that year.
Rude Pravo, the official Communist daily paper, said Dubcek's
party membership has been suspended pending investigation into his
conduct as head of the party in 1968 and 1969.
Dubcek is presently Czechoslovakianambassador to Turkey.
THE U.S.S.R. IS STARTING A NEW series of long-range
missile tests which could lead to Soviet deployment of multiple
warheads this year, U.S. specialists say.
The Soviet Union's radio has broadcast warnings that the Rus-
sians will be firing carrier rockets into the Pacific Ocean for about
three weeks.
The Soviets did not say what kind of test firings would be in-
volved, but they are expected to include the huge SS9 which American
authorities say mounts a triple warhead with accuracy, impact pat-
tern, and power enough to knock out U.S. Minuteman missiles in their
underground silos.
The new Soviet tests came amid Russian statements deploring
announced U.S. plans to start deploying multiple warhead missiles
this summer, saying this is seriously threatening upcoming arms lim-
itation negotiations.
CAMBODIA'S NEW CHIEF OF STATE, Cheng Chen, was
sworn in before the country's National Assembly yesterday.
Cheng Chen, now president of the National Assembly, took over
as chief of state when Cambodia's Parliament ousted Prince Norodum
Sihanouk by unanimous vote while he was in Paris.
Premier General Lon Nol spoke during the ceremony, declaring
the government will "safeguard our independence within our pres-
ent borders."
Nol also demanded that other nations observe international law
and warned the ousted chief who is now in Peking, that "any plot
detrimental to Cambodia will be condemned as treason."

WASHINGTON LI) - President Nixon yesterday indicat-
ed that the administration has decided not' to sell to Israel
all the jet fighters it is seeking.
Nixon said the actual decision on Israel's request will be
announced tomorrow noon by Secretary of State William
P. Rogers.
Although the President refused to say what that decision
will actually be, in describing the reasoning behind the decis-
ion he made clear his reluctance to give Israel the jets at
this time.
He described the U.S. policy on the Middle East conflict
as seeking a cease-fire, reduction of arms shipments into the
area and a political settle-

A New Film by Jean-Luc Godard

MARCH 25 thru 29
Trueblood Theatre
800 p.m.

ment.
The President repeatedly stress-
ed that keeping a balance of power
among the forces is an import-
ant factor in the effort for peace.
He said the United States will con-
tinue to assess the situation to
see whether there is a need for
"assistance to Israel so they would
not be in an inferior position."
He added, however, that imbal-
ance of power means "the danger
of war escalates."
The President said disturbing
reports of further Soviet arms
shipments to Egypt in recent days
could lead to a change in the
power balance, and he declared
that if that happens "the United
States would take action to deal
with that situation."
But he said that the recent
Soviet help for Egypt-reported to
include modern anti-aircraft mis-
siles and technicians-so far "do
not indicate a significant shift
in the balance."
Israel2is reported tobe seeking
about 25 more supersonic F4
Phantoms and around 80 more
A4 Skyhawk jets.

Box Office opens Monday, March 23 at 10 a.m.
Phone 764-5387

TICKETS - $2.00, $3.50

* Easter Sunday Performance ONLY AT 7 p.m.

11

mompowmad n

r

qtnpath 0,thetsesi/
'k th Te e fly toej
April 9, 10, 11, 12. Presented by the Wayne Cinema Guild.
Shown in Helen DeRoy Auditorium, located off Cass Avenue
on the Wayne State University Campus. Advance sale re-
served performance tickets $1.50 or $2 at the door. Advance
tickets go on sale Monday, March 9 at the University Center
box office. Tickets may also be purchased by sending a
stamped, self-addressed envelope with the correct amount in
cash or check to: "Sympathy," Wayne Cinema Guild, Box 14,
Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202. Be sure to
specify the performance you desire along with alternate
choices.,
The performances are scheduled thus:
Thursday and Sunday, April 9 & 12, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. in
Upper DeRoy Auditorium.
Friday and Saturday, April 10 & 11, 6, 8:30, and 11 p.m. in
Upper DeRoy Auditorium. 7:15, 9:45, & midnight in Lower
DeRoy. ,
STARTS TUESDAY-Cinema V's
GREAT DIRECTORS' FESTIVAL
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY-MARCH 24, 25

MONDAY-MARCH 23
TEACH IN FOR
SOVIET JEWS
11:00-1:00 P.M.-Library, Winchel House West Quad
"Jewish Life in the Soviet Union"
Dr. Gene Sosin-Berlin, Germany
Joseph Ben Dak-Research Sociologist C.R.C.R.
SPONSORED BY
CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON CONFLICT RESOLUTION
1:00-3:00 P..-The MUG, Michigan Union
"Effective Action for the Soviet Jews"
Harold Light-Chairman of the Bay Area
Council on Soviet Jewry

BIKEL TO APPEAR:
Students to march tomorrow
against Russian anti-semitism

Mqichigan
civil rights
chief shot.
DETROIT (P) - Burton Gordin,
executive director of the Michigan
Civil Rights Commission was slain
Friday night at his parked car
in a garage in downtown Detroit.
Gordin was shot three times in
the chest Friday shortly after
leaving his downtown office. His
body was found about two blocks
from the station. The side door of
his car was open, the motor run-
ning. His wallet had not been
touched and his belongings appar-
ently were not disturbed, police
said.
Associates of Gordon said yes-
terday they knew of nothing that
would connect the killing with his
civil rights work.
Julian Cook Jr., commission
chairman said: "No one had any-
thing to gain by killing him, and
he would have told me if he had
been threatened."
Homicide detectives declined to
speculate whether Gordin, 51, was
an assassination target. They said
they were without a suspect or 'a
motive. There was some specula-
tion that 'the killer might h a v e
been attempting a robbery but was
frightened away before taking
anything.
The shooting occurred just a
few hours after Gordin issued a
statement critical of Flint Police
Chief James Rutherford, who
earlier in the week said a commis-
sion investigator was involved with
activities of the radical Students
for a Democratic Society (D)).
Rutherford sent a telegram to
the Justice Department Wednes-
day asking for assistance in in-
vestigating reports that the mili-
tant Weatherman faction of the
SDS may have planned nation-
wide bombings at a so-called "War
Council" in Flint last December.
In his wire, Rutherford said:
"We are concerned with the in-
volvement of at least one Michi-
gan Civil Rights Commission in-
vestigator and other government
employes with the SDS group."
Michigan Gov. William Millliken
said, the slaying of Gordin, "stilled
a major voice in the civil rights
struggle."
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00, by carrier. $3.00 by
mail.

By PAT MEARS
A candlelight march and rally
to protest the alleged persecution
of Soviet J e w s by the Russian
government will take place Mon-
day at 7:30 p.m. Organizers ex-
pect about 1,000 participants,
Coming from as far away as To-
ledo.
The march will begin on the
Diag and proceed to the Michi-
gan Union Ballroom where a ral-

ly, featuring Jewish folksinger
Theodore Bikel, will be held.
The purpose of the march and
rally is to put "public pressure on
the Soviet Union that hopefully
will cause the government tore-
examine their policies and to
practice what they preach," says
Larry Schwartz, organizer of the
action and master of ceremonies
for the rally.
Schwartz says the Soviet Con-

I

SPONSORED BY THE COMMITTEE ON SOVIET JEWS
4:30-6:30 P.M.-Residential College
"The Jews of Siec
Jay Masserman-U of M Medical School
Dee Wernett-Residential College

in Pepson! The Fabulous
I4 HARLEM
GLODETRO1IERS
"MAGICIANS OF BASKETBALL"
Plus The Famous Globetrotter
ADDED ATTRACTIONS;
featuring the Ginny Tiu Review .
Mon., Apr. 6-1:30 P.M
Univ. of Mich.-Crisler Arena
admission $4.00-3.00-2.00
'' discount for kids
TICKETS ON SALE:
U-M ATHLETIC DEPT.
1000S. State St. Ph. 662-3238
Mail orders send self-addressed
stamped envelope

stitution guarantees certain "re-
ligious and cultural" rights and
personal freedoms to all Russian
citizens and that these rights arel
being violated in the case of Jew-
ish inhabitants. He claims t h e
Jews are being "systematically
persecuted" in such particulars as,
education and job rights, and they
are notallowed to emigrate from
the Soviet Union.
Schwartz feels the Russian de-
cision-makers will "defini-tely feel
the pressure of this rally" if the
turnout is large.
"The Soviet government is very
concerned a b o u t its image
abroad," and especially in third
world countries," he says. "We will
not be silenced until they correct
this discrepancy."
The rally's first speaker will be
Hal Light, a retired businessman
who founded the San Francisco
Bay Area Council for Soviet Jews.
Light has visited the Soviet Un-
ion on a number of occasions and,
"is considered an expert" on the
problems of the Russian Jews, ac-
cording to Schwartz.
After Light's talk a member of
the Speech Department will read
the poem "Babi Yar" by the Rus-
sian poet Yevgeny Yevtushenk.
After the reading, Schwartz will
introduce the featured guest, The-
odore Bikel, a folksinger who has
been active'in the cause of Soviet
Jewry.

JAN NEMEC'S
"ORAT IO
FOR
PRAGUE"
"Begun as a documentary of Czec-
hoslovakia, and then simply con-
tinued when the Russian tanks
moved in . . marked with the
r straint and beauty of Nemec's
style . . . so moving that one is
near tears from the first mo-
ment!"-N.Y. TIMES
"Soft Skin"-6:45
"Oratorio"-8:45
"Soft Skin"-94:15

11

RADICAL FILM SERIES
and
REVIEW PRESENTATIONS
pres ent
THE FIRST-RUN CAMPUS PREMIERE OF
FIDEL

THURSDAY,
YVES ROBERT'S
"Alexander"

FRIDAY-MARCH 26, 27
MILOS FORMAN'S
& "Firemen's Ball"

SATURDAY, SUNDAY-MARCH 28, 29-PETER SELLERS IN
"Heavens Above" and "I'm All Right, Jack"
MONDAY, TUESDAY-MARCH 30, 31
SHIRLEY CLARKE'S MICHAEL ROEMER'S
"Cool World" "Nothing But a Man"
WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY-APRIL 1, 2
JOSEPH LOSEY'S MICHAEL TRUMAN'S
"The Accident" & "Model Murder Case"
FRIDAY, SATURDAY-APRIL 3, 4
SO WIDERBERG'SQ QKAREL REISZ'S
"Elvira Madigan" "Morgan"
SUNDAY, MONDAY-APRIL 5, 6
CLAUDE BERRI'S 'Q BRUCE BROWN'S
"The Two of Us" & "Endless Summer"

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