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March 21, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-21

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Tues., March 24 and Wed., March 25
THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES PRESENTS
El Retablo de las Maravillas
by MIQUEL DE CERVANTES
(a one act farce by the author of Don Quijote)
/ AND,
El Tricilo
by FERNANDO ARRABAL
(from the theater of the absurd)
8 P.M. Lydia Mendelssohn Theater
TICKETS: $2.00, $1.50 at Lydia Mendelssohn
ticke' office

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PhONE: 764-0554

Saturday, March 21, 1970

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

the,
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Postal
reach

workers, government

temporary

agreement

. . . . ..e.f. . .,
.. *..*,. 1 .3c . ..:. . a.:. .~..... . . . . . . ...............::a... ......,r ..t"..... .. . . . . .... ......f......"...... ...,... rt.... ...
CINEMA 11113
SATURDAY & SUNDAY, MARCH 21 & 22
dir. JEAN RENOIR (937).
GRAND ILLUSION
A perfect film,
starring ERICH VON STROHEIM
"I made this film because I am a pacifist"
-Renoir
7 & 9:05 Architecture
662-8871 75c Auditorium

WALTER J. HICKEL, Secretary of the Interior, plans to step
up enforcement of regulations governing offshore oil fields in the
Gulf of Mexico.
Hickel said in an interview that he plans to ask for additional
funds and will double the number of federal inspectors policing the
oil field.
The decision was prompted by a massive oil spill from a Chevron
Oil Company platform which caught fire off Louisiana last month and
then gushed oil into the gulf.
Since then, authorities have found at least 147 violations of
federal regulations in Chevron's operations in the area, according
to Hickel. He indicated he may seek fines up to $2,000 a day for each
violation, once a final report has been completed by the U.S. Geological
Survey.

-- --

* *

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Jul1

THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION yesterday or-
dered an investigation of the artificial sweetener saccharin.
The National Academy of Science-National Research Council will
evaluate experimental evidence and present recommendations within
two months on the widely-used sweetener, which was recently linked
to cancer in mice.
S * *
THE CAMBODIAN GOVERNMENT announced yesterday
that it would use force oif ousted leader Prince Norodom Sihanouk
tried to return to power.
Meanwhile, a number of Sihanouk's supporters were placed under
house arrest. Since Sihanouk was overthrown Wednesday, the country
has been under virtual martial law.
Cambodian constitutional rights have been suspended for six
months, all meetings of more than three persons have been banned,
and the government is exercising strict control over newspapers.
* *~ *
LIVING COSTS ROSE one-half of one per cent last month,
continuing the nation's worst living cost rise in twenty years.
Higher food prices, a jump in home mortgage interest rates and
other price hikes in February caused the increase.
President Nixon last week had partially lifted his freeze on fed-
eral construction funds for state and local projects, saying his stringent
economic policies had begun moving the nation towards stable prices.
He added that "the rate of inflation still remains an urgent concern."
THAI TROOPS have reportedly been flown to Laos to
help defend the Long Cheng army base from an expected North
Vietnamese attack.
Sources also said that U.S. planes moved the Thai troops to
Laos, but White House press secretary Ronald L. Ziegler declined
to comment on the report. He did call the report of That involve-
ment in Laos, "grossly exaggerated."
At the same time, a pro-Communist Pathet Lao emissary arrived
in Vientiane, the capital of Laos, with a peace plan from Hanoi.
Long Cheng is about 90 miles from Vientiane, and North Viet-
namese forces presently command hilltop positions about a mile
from the base.

-Daily-Jay Cassidy

fWASHINGTON AM - -The
threat of a nationwide mail
stoppage was postponed yes-
terday when the gpvernment
agreed to discuss salary de-
mands of its mailmen if they
end their illegal, localized
strikes immediately.
Postal union leaders said they
would ask their workers to return
to their jobs in New York City
and other areas afflicted by the
week's spreading postal stoppage.
However, the largest of the un-
ions-the Letter Carriers who be-
gan the wildcat strikes Wednes-
day -- added a proviso that deep-
ened the urgency of the impend-
ing negotiations between govern-
ment and postal workers.
The union leaders said if no
agreement is reached in five
days of talks, union president
James H. Rademacher will call a
nationwide strike, even though
strikes by federal employes are
forbidden by law.
The temporary agreement was
reached after a two and one-half
hour meetingbetween Secretary
of Labor George P. Shultz and
the presidents of seven postal un-
ions.
Rademacher then carried the
plan b a c k to a meeting of 300
branch chairmen of his National
Association of Letter Carriers.
The leaders 'agreed to call on
their men to return to work.
Shultz said the union presidents
had assured him they would reaf-
firm to their workers their feeling
that the work stoppage was 11-
legal and could not be supported
by the union chiefs.
In return, Shultz said, he had
assured the union leaders that
"as soon as the work stoppage is
ended, the Post Office Depart-
ment will be ready to enter dis-
cussions with the unions prompt-
ly."
The carriers - whose picket
lines in New York, Cleveland, De-
troit, Philadelphia and elsewhere
w e r e being respected by other
postal workers - are protesting
their current wage scale, which
ranges from $6,176 a y e a r to
start and climbs to $8,442 after
21 years. They want to make the
pay range $8,500 to start and $11,-
700 after five years.

III..

Students protest at Honors Convocation

DR. STRANGELOVE
Starring PETER SELLERS, GEORGE C. SCOTT
with shorts: LONELY BOY, starring Paul Anka
GOD IS DOG SPELLED BACKWARDS
MARCH 20-21, FRI.-SAT. 7 and 9:30 P.
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL 75c
'There's nothing wrong with having a law de-
gree."-Joseph Strick
Sunday-GUNGA DIN with Cary Grant
PLUS REAR GUNNER with Ronald Reagan, and
Desi Arnaz and his Band

Parents perplexed by action
before Honors Convocation

Y'

Pr-

' °
1
; 1
1

presents
combining the elements of flsound, ivYe performers, and
fantstc stwihaacopnng object environment.
The notion of various media in relation to openings or parts-
specifiC parts in a' given condition-or the word, "garage"; how
man times is it considered and yet we still fail to think about t.
like the inevitability of mieeting people socially
unseen activity arising from a contingency;
the inability to make a decision .. .. .
the possibility of just thinking about it
TON IE ! !directed by
FR . .Don Davidson
-
Trueblood uditorium Fri., March 0- 30$ 2
Sal., March 2- O$1O
8:30-$1 .25
Premiere Showing of
SHOPPIN
An Original Rock Musical

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier. $3.00 by
mail.
Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily

By NADINE COHODAS 9
Yesterday morning's picket at a
Hill Aud. probably didn't help
bridge the Generation Gap.
In fact, from the looks on their
faces as they snaked through the,
demonstrators and from their9
comments once inside Hill, it
seems as though most parents were
puzzled and disdainful of the ac-
tivities.
"I have no reaction because I
don't know what they're protest-
ing about," claimed one mother
wrapped in her black persian lamb
coat with mink collar. But she
added. "I dislike seeing people do
things thoughtlessly by rote -
I dislike seeing people walk
around like a bunch of monkeys."
When the issue was briefly ex-
plained to her, the woman said
she was "not in favor at all of
a fixed percentage of any race.
Students should .be admitted on
the basis of qualification not on
the color of skin or whether their
eyes are blue, pink, yellow or
green."
One man perusing the lobby
apparently looking for his daugh-
ter, only glowered at the entire
iffair. But another man standing in
the foyer said "as long as they
want to walk it's all right with me
if they're not interfering. I don't
think they are.
"I didn't expect this," he ad-
mitted. "But I know about it now."
"I'm not taking this too ser-
iously," said another mother, dis-
traught because she had been wait-
ing "for my rotten daughter to
show up." "So they want to pro-
test, let them," the mother said.
"Every age has to do something
-this one is to protest.
"I think it's silly," she c o n-
tinued, "and I know some of the
other parents don't like this shut-

it-down business." She said she
believes black "students have "a
right to come, but so do others. I
guess their freedom stops where
my nose begins."
At least one parent decided to
confront the issue. On his way
into Hill he stopped and read the
"Support BAM" and "Shut it
Down" posters. "Why do you want
to shut it down?" he asked two
protesters. "There should be some-
body explaining this to the par-
ents. Most of them are from out
of town and don't know what the
issues are.

"The picketers look like a bunch'
of idiots run wild to them," he
added.
Briefly discussing the issue with
another student stationed at one
of the inside doors, the man said
it was not money spent for the
Honors Convocation that was
keeping the black programs from
being funded.
"It's the $20 billion dollars the
government spends in Vietnam,"
he said. If they stopped the war,,
he asserted on his way to the
balcony, then money would be
available for black programs.

Landlord refuses to recognize
iTUwithout contract revisions

i ~ .

--

"
DIAL 5-6290
WALTER MATTHAU
INGRID BERGMAN
GOLDIE HAWN
t
TIowod 7
Today at 1:,10-3-5-7-9 P.M.

By RICK PERLOFF
Dennis Dahlmann, the manager
and part-owner of Dahlmann
Apartments, told 35 . Ann Arbor
Tenants Union members yesterday
that he would not recognize the
union until it revises portions of a
proposed tenant-landlord contract.
The Tenants Union members-
some of whom were Dahlmann
tennants-had gathered in Dahl-
mann's Church St. office following
a half-hour of picketing outside.
During this period, several Ten-
ants Union members met with
Dahlmann and discussed the con-
tract with him.
This is the second consecutive
Friday that the tenants have con-
fronted Dahlmann.. They are de-
manding that he honor the peti-
tions of 70 per cent of his tenants
who have agreed to let the union
represent them in collective bar-
gaining.

Dahlmann manages about 180
apartment units and is one of the
ten or so "target" landlords on
which the union has concentrated
attention.
Dahlmann'explained yesterday
that he had disagreements over
25 of the approximately 100 claus-
es in the proposed contract.
"If the 25 are revised, we will
execute the contract and I will
recognize the Tenants Union at
the same time," he said. "I don't
think it would be right to rec-
ognize the union today and then
look at the document and change
my mind next week. If I recognize
you, I need to accept the docu-
ment."
Tenants Union members dis-
agreed, maintaining that recog-
nition was not contingent on Dahl-,
mann's acceptance of the contract.
They contended that in order to
negotiate it was necessary for
Dahlmann to recogizp the exist-
ence of the body with which he
would be negotiating.
Later, Dahlmann tenant David
Yoder, a member of the union's
Representative Assembly, said
that once recognition was achiev-
ed, "We are willing to revise some
of the clauses in the contract."'
Yoder, who helped draft the con-
tract, said it encompassed a reg-

ular lease but "liberalizes tenant-
landlord relations."
The contract calls for the es-
tablishment of a grievance board
-composed of Dahlmann tenants,
the landlord and union mem-
bers--which would attempt to re-
solve disputes between tenants and
landlords without going to court.
In addition, the contract pro-
poses that the damage deposit be
held in an account opened by the
union. The deposit would be re-
turned to the tenant within 10
days after the lease ends, unless
the landlord charges the tenant
with damage.
The contract also states that the
tenant determine the length of the
lease and that leases not be less
than four months.
The proposed contract implies
elimination of the payment of the
last month's rent at the beginning
of a tenant's lease.
"Anything charged in advance
before occupancy will be applied
toward the first month's rent only
and won't exceed the first month
rent," Yoder explained.
Dahlmann would not disclose
which portions of the contract he
disputed, but said he would be
willing to meet with the Tenants
Union to discuss them. Dahlmann
tenants are meeting Monday to
formulate strategies to achieve
recognition.

U OF M MENS 8:30 P.M.
G L E E C L U B TICKET SALES AT HILL BOX OFFICE
A P R I L 3 H I Block Ticket Sales March 24-26
LAUDITORIGeneral Ticket Sales March 30-April 3
UM UDORMTickets Prices: $3, $2.50, $2
UM U OF M
M E N S GLEE C MAIL ORDERS TO:
U of M Mens Glee Club
L U B A P R I L 3 6048 Administration Bldg.
HILL AUDITORI Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104
U M U O F M PHONE 764-7265

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SHOWIN4G FOX VILLa6E
375 No. MAPLE RD. '7694300

TI MES
1:30-4:00
6:45-9:20

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