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March 20, 1970 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six
4 ARRESTED:
800 marchers clash:
S.1 T 1
~A~ -I l -l U Id U £'l~.'"~d Ud

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Frir n i tl nr l, 7(1 10-7A

i ' t-ricioyj march L'V I

I yIV
-j"

I

Regents set 10 per cent goal
for increased black admissions

I

W11 nSta LU
(Continued from Page 1)
classrooms and urged students to
strike, charging that the demands
had been "summarily dismissed"
by the Regents.
Regrouping on Regents Plaza at
2:20 p.m., the demonstrators'
noticed President Robben Flem-
ing, Vice President for State Re-
lations and Planning Arthur Ross,
and Regent Robert Brown (R-
Stockbridge) walking down the
Union driveway toward the Ad-
ministration Bldg.
Surrounding the three, the dem-
onstrators accompanied them to
the Thompson St. entrance of the
Administration Bldg. They shout-
ed jeers and slogans at the ad-
ministrators, who appeared un-
perturbed by the protesters.
At the entrance, the locked doors
were opened, allowing Fleming and
Brown to enter. When Ross enter-
ed, several demonstrators pushed
the door completely open.
A guard tried unsuccessfully to
force the door closed, and in the
process, the keys to the Admin-
istration Bldg. were taken out of
his hands by one of the demon-
strators.
At 2:25, 20 of the demonstrators
entered the building and milled
around on the first floor, which
serves as a lobby.
According to Vice President and
Chief Financial Officer Wilbur
Pierpont, the police, who had been
mobilized on a stand-by basis,
were then requested to come to the
Administration Bldg.
Warned that police were com-
ing, the demonstrators left the
building at 2:30. About 45 riot
equipped police arrived shortly
after at the Thompson St. en-
trance and entered the building.
As the last pollce officer passed
through the entrance, a large brick
was thrown toward at him, leav-
ing a gaping hole in a glass frame
above the door.
At about this time, police ar-
rested Veronica Banks, '72 Nurs-
ing after a rock was thrown at the
south wall of the Administration
Bldg. Miss Banks denies throwing
the rock.
Five city police officers put her
in a patrol car that was, parked
in the Union driveway, between
the Administration Bldg. and West
Quadrangle.
About 500 demonstrators im-
mediately surrounded the car
shouting, "Let her, go."
At 2:40, 20 police marched up to
the driveway. Brandishing riot
sticks, they charged into the
crowd, pushing them to the side-
walk. E
When a few of the demonstra-
tors tried to fight back, the melee
started. Several marchers threw
bricks rocks, and bottles at the

ilUZUaipUlcul
police, many of whom responded
by applying their riot sticks to
those demonstrators who 'did not
move out of the area.
Unable to scatter the crowd, the
police regrouped on Thompson St.
next to theAdministration Bldg.
and walked backwards toward Jef-
ferson St. amid a barrage of rocks
and bricks.
At 2:45, the 40 police officers in
the Administration Bldg. lobby
marched out to join the other
police.
All 70 city police then lined up
across Thompson St. next to the
western side of the Student Activi-
ties Bldg. About 20 yards behind
them were a contigent of about
15 state police.
The demonstrators filled most
of the block between Jefferson St.
and the Union driveway, the front
row moving to within five feet of
the police. While some rocks were
thrown, the crowd remained large-
ly peaceful and made no attempt
to test the police line.
At 3:00, about 25 of the police
left the area, and by 3:15 those
remaining began marching back to
City Hall, where the Police De-
partment is located.
Fleming said last night that ar-
rangements were made prior to
the Regents meeting to have the
"necessary" number of police
available in order to prevent the
"destruction of property." '
"We don't like to have the police
on campus any more than they
want to be here," Fleming said.
"But when we know there is a real
problem of destruction of prop-
erty, we naturally have to do
something to protect that prop-
erty."
The president said that four win-
dows in his home on S. University
Ave. had been smashed following
yeste'rday's Regents meeting.
The four people' arrested were
Allan David, '70, T. R. Harrison,
Thomas Marsh, '72, and Miss
Banks.
David and Harrison were charg-
ed with assault with intent to do
great bodily harm, a felony, and
released by District Judge Pieter
Thomassen on $750 bail.
Marsh was charged with as-
saulting an officer, a high misde-
meanor, and resisting arrest.
Thomassen set bond at $500 and
ordered a preliminary examination
for Mar. 25.
Miss Banks was charged w i t h
malicious destruction of 'proper-
ty, a misdemeanor, and released
by Thomassen on $25 bail. She
was ordered to appear before Dis-
trict Judge S. J. Elden at 8:30
a.m. today for arraignment.

(Continued from Page 1)
Harris asked why the BAM-pro-
posed tuition waiver for in-state
disadvantaged blacks was n o t
mentioned. Regent Lawrence Lin-
demer (R-Stockbridge) replied,
"Since that matter does not ap-
pear in this proposal I think it is
clear that the Regents have re-
jected it as unworkable."
Anthropology Prof. Gloria Mar-
shall told the Regents, "You have
been making it sound as if your
proposal agrees with the one by
the black staff and faculty. I want
to make it very clear that it does
not."
The resolution, signed by 31
black faculty and staff members,
called for a "Financial Task
Force" to seek out aid money and
financial aid to all students who
need it in addition to the 10 per
cent goal and separation of finan-
cial aid and admissions goals
passed by the Regents.
Mrs. Marshal also asked the
Regents to reword the enrollment
provision to guarantee a goal of
10 per cent; saying the present
wording was unclear.
Several Regents replied that
that was their understanding of
the proposal as it read and they
saw no reason to change it.
In other business the Regents
abolished hours restrictions for
women living in University resi-
dence halls. Previously women
under 21 had hours unless given
parental permission.
In addition, discount bookstore
got the final go-ahead with ap-
proval of its articles of in cor
poration, and the mandatory re-
tirement age of deans was set in
the Regents Bylaws at 65.
The vote on minority admissions
yesterday by the Regents followed
over a month of meetings between
BAM representatives andsthe ad-
ministration on the demands. At
last month's open hearing with
the Regents, BAM presented its
demands and the Regents in-
structed Fleming to come to them
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1209 S. University 663-7151

this month with a proposal for
meeting the demands.
Before taking action yesterday,
the Regents each made a brief
speech. The entire meeting was
carried over radio-a first in re-
cent history.
Most of the Regents expressed
sentiments similar to Regent Rob-
ert Nederlander (D-Birmingham).
"The demands are reasonable and
fair," 'he said. "I think it's neces-
sary in our time to do all we can
to see that blacks are brought in-
to the mainstream of life.,"
"I want to avoid any possibility
of deception. Except where there
is mention of commitment, these
are goals, good faith goals," Lin-
demer emphasized.
Both Regent Gerald Dunn (D-
Flushing) and Lindemer mention-
ed the need to "restructure Uni-
versity priorities," a key point of
disagreement between administra-
tors and BAM. BAM , eaders have
said the problem was the Univer-
sity's priorities and not its total
finances.
At a special meeting last night,
Senate Advisory Committee on

University Affairs (SACUA), the
top facult body, called for "com-
mitment by faculties of schools
and departments" to the 10 per
cent goal and declared its inten-
tion to make suggestions for fac-
ulty participation in funding black
admmissions to Senate Assembly.
AL the meeting Fleming ex-
pressed some support for the re-
ordering of University fund prior-
ities. "It is clear that this goal
cannot be reached without some
restructuring of internal finan- "
ces," he said.
Vice President for State Rela-
tions and Planning Arthur Ross
repeated that point after the meet-
ing and mentioned the need for
additional funds. "I am prepared
to make the strongest effort I can
in Lansing to get greater support
in the student aid field,"

CROSBY,

*i

STILLS,
NASH,
and YOUNG

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Wherever he is ... as a college
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* * .

BAM calls strike, rally
at Honors Convocation

I

(Continued from Page 1)
want to know what you want to
do," he said. ""We want to make
an effort to keep this as coordi-
nated as possible."
Perrin emphasized the need for
organization. "BAM is going to
try to provide leadership, an in-
spiration for people who want to
act," he said.
Yesterday afternoon, President
Fleming released a report to the
University community summariz-
ing the Regents' action. The state-
ment asked students "to remain
away 'from any 'mass actions."
"Large crowds inevitably include

those who wish to be destructive
and they are not under the con-
trol of the majority," the state-
ment said.
In summarizing the Regents de-
cisions, Fleming said they did "not
meet all the black student de-
mands," but that they did "go a
long way, particularly in estab-
lishing a goal that 10 per cent of
the Ann Arbor student population
be black by 1973-74.
"Not all of the funds to accomp-
lish that goal are presently identi-
fiable, but with full cooperation of
all theschools and colleges it can
be reached," he said.

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