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March 19, 1970 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-19

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, March 19, 1970

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, March 19, 1970

Questions unresolved following Daily OfficialB
Re~t0RSRR1eSO1ed ~llW1RDay cdeinar

t

five-day environmental teach-in

(Continued from Page l'
"I read a quote from a presi-
dential advisor saying that tech-!
nology can take care of this,"
MacMullan said. "That's a lot of
hogwash."
" Assuming environmental prob-
lems can be cured, who should pay
for it? The federal government,
corporations and the American
people were three sources of money
suggested by different experts.
Consumer advocate Ralph Na-
der urged that corporate profits
be used to fund anti-pollution re-
search and development.
Sen.. Gaylord Nelson (D-Wis)
among others, recommeided that
the federal government pay to
clean up the environment through
reordering its priorities. He called
for immediate expenditures of $25
billion per year on the environ-
ment.
Another solution was implie4 by
state Rep. Raymond Smit who
suggested that taxes and the cost
of living might have to rise as

much as ten per cent to stop pol-
lution.
0 Can the present political sys-
tem be ,repaired to handle en-
vironmental decay or are more
radical changes needed? Separat-
ing the liberals from the radicals,
this question was one of the most
controversial of w the teach-in.
"I think you can fight within
the system and make it respond,"
commented Reuther. "There will
obviously have to be some re-
structuring through the political
process."
Others called for b r o a d e r
changes. "The only solution for
the people is to take back their
country and industries," Shapiro
said. "And that means making a
revolution."
Author Murray Bookchin argued
that it is impossible to live in har-
mony with the natural world with
America's present hierarchical,
competitive society. He said' that
ecological action must be revolu-
tionary or be nothing at all.

" How effective is government
in the fight to save the environ-
ment? Most of the politicians de-
fended their efforts while others
were critical.
"I don't think government has
been locking horns with this mat-
ter the way it should," actor Eddie
Albert said on Thursday.'
C. C. Johnson, head of the De-
partment of Health, Education
and W e 1 f a r e's environmental
health service, claimed that public
apathy is the reason why govern-
ment has not takes more affirma-
tive action against pollution.
Taking a similar stand, Mayor
Robert Harris said no public of-
ficial would vote for higher taxes
or attack powerful economic in-
terests without strong public sup-
port.
* Finally, is the environmental
crisis obscuring other issues such
as poverty, racism and the Viet-
nam war?
Hatcher, for example, charged
that the issue is taking the na-
tion's attention away from .he
problems of discrimination, "some-
thing not even a Bull Connor or
George Wallace could do."
Muskie also expressed concern
that the anti-pollution crusade
not "become a smokescreen that
will obscure the overall crisis of
life in America."
Disagreeing with this view, Com-
moner said there are definite links
between pollution, the war and the
problems of blacks and warned
against believing people who claim
they are separate.
None of these basic issues were
resolved at the teach-in-but res-
olution was not its goal. A final
evaluation of the event will have
to wait until awareness is trans-
formed into action.

Physics Seminar: H. Harrison. "Elec-
trical Characteristics of Thin Metal-
Metal oxide - Metal Sandwiches" P&A
Colloq., Rm., 12:00 p.m.
Mental Health Research Inst. Sem-
roar: David Mechanic, U. of Wis.,.
"Problems and Prospects in Psychia-
tric Epidemiology". 1057 Mental Health I
Research Inst., 3:45 p.m.
Speech (Student Lab Theater): "The-
Critic" and "Love's the eBast Doctor",
Arena Theater, Frieze Bldg., 4:10 p.m.
Phi Beta Kappa Annual Initiatnon
Banquet: B1. C. Keeney, Wash. D.C.,
speaker, Mich. Union, 6:30 p.m.
Slavic Lang and Lit. Dance Concert:
Oakland Univ., Russian Dance Troupe,
200 Lane Hall, 7:30 p.m.
Degree Recital: Gerald Errante, clar-
Davis' sit-in
(Continued from Page 1)
Regents Room. So far, Davis
claims, Regents have been enter-
ing the biulding by rear and side
doors, thus avoiding him.
Although the Regents are not
expected to consider the bylaws at
today's meeting, Davis says he
thinks he has shown that fasting
has some powei- to mobilize peo-
ple. He mentions the students who
continually visit him, those who
slept outside the building last
night, and "several other peoplel
who are fasting now."
Though he plans to continue
fasting through Friday dinner,
Davis has decided to leave the
Administration Building after to- I
day's Regents meeting. His orig-!
inal plans were made on the basis
that the Regents would meet Fri-
day, as they usually do. But now,
It seems there is little value. in
staying the extra day. "Anyway,"
says Davis, "fasting is one thing-
but losing sleep is another."

s ch. of Music Recital Hall. 8:00 ceive alumni job bulletin all summer.
.Michifish Annual Water Show: Mar- SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
r; 't Lc1 Pool, 8:15 p.m. 212 SAB, Lower Level
Prolessional Theatre Program: "Your Interviews at Summer riacement:
Own Thing", Hill Aud 8:30 p.m. 'MARCH 19:
Classic Crafts Corp, summer college
Placement Service pRog cpany reps, car nec.
GENERAL DIVISION Kelly Services, register for typing, file
3200 S.AB. clerk, bus. mach, oper., computer
Interviews end first week in April. witchboard. gen. office wk.
Current openings being received for Camp Michigania. U of M Family,
new grads, contact by mail. Come in Camp. men for archery, riding, boating,
and browse, get on mailing list to re- swimimng (WSI) riflery.
(University CooperativeI
RoZ"E DUCED PRICES'
PARTIAL LISTING OF SERVICES
Save 2-3c gal, on gasoline
Save money on appliances
Save 10% on haircuts
JO IN THE COOP
COOP OFFICE, Basement, Michigan Union, 761-2808
STUDENT CREDIT UNION, 1 st Floor, Michigan Union
EMPLOYEE'S CREDIT UNION, 508 E. William
The University Cooperative is non-profit, consumer
service organization, owned and controlled by its
members
University Cooperative

w

RAM calls for strike;
Regents vote on plan

wl'

(Continued from Page 1)
estimated 1,050 to about 3,000 by
1973-74. The administration oro-
posal would raise black enrollment
to about 2,100.
The executive officers-the vice
presidents and Fleming-have em-
phasized that while increasing
black enrollment to 2,100 would
be the primary goal, additional en-
rollment above the 2,100 figure
would be sought by recruiters.
However, those' black students
admitted over the 2,100 level who
could not afford enrollment, Would
not be financed by direct Univer-
sity expenditure. Instead,-the Uni-
versity would "intensify efforts to
raise additional funds... through
state, federal and gift sources in
support of the (financial aid)
program," the administration pro-
posal states.
At an open hearing before the
Regents yesterday, BAM leaders
said they would not accept adop-
tion of the administration's pro-
posal, because it was "irrelevant to
the actual BAILdemands."
Darryl Gorman, a member of
the Black Student Union and
S t u d e n t Government Council,
charged the administration's pro-
posal would increase black enroll-
ment to about 5.5 per cent by
1973-74-substantially lower than
the 10 per cent. demanded by
BAM.
Calling the proposal a "nebu-
lous, weasel-worded proposition,"
G-MrmAnt Mld tha hpnrn'i i s

a battle of political realities, and
self-interest. If we (black students
and the administration) are in-
deed on a collision course, so be
it."
Alan Kauffman, coordinator of
the coalition of radical groups that
supports BAM's demands, predict-
ed last night that "failure of the
Regents to adopt the demands
could easily lead to a militant"
response" from the coalition.

$

N.Y. victim unknown

1k

New York City police so far
have not been able to identify the
third body found in the rubble of
a Greenwich Village townhouse
destroyed by a dynamite blast 12
days ago.
Rumors that Bill Ayers, one of
the national leaders of the Weath-
ermen faction of SDS, was the
unidentified victim have been
proven to be untrue as several
reliable sources reported they've
seen him alive since the explosion.
Inspector Thomas McGuire, who
is in charge of the investigation,
yesterday said he was "aware of
Ayers" but he would not confirm
or deny that the police were
searching for him.
McGuire said Ayers' name was
not included in a list compiled of
names from miscellaneous papers
found in the rubble.
Avi_ i 1in

Ann Arbor and led the Jesse
James Gang faction which con-
tributed leadership to the Weath-
ermen.
Authorities said the townhouse
on W. 11th St. was wrecked when
homemade bombs being manu-
factured inside accidentally blew
up.
Diana Oughton, also a member
of the Jesse James Gang and the
Weathermen, was identified as
one of the dead persons found in
the wreckage..
Meanwhile Flint Police Chief
James Rutherford asked federal
authorities yesterday to investigate
the possibility that dynamite was
reportedly purchased in Flint last
December during a Weathermen
convention may be connected with
recent bombings across the

10

a

Systems programmers at RCA get somewhat involved with hardware.

There used to be a theory that
systems programmers didn't talk
with hardware designers.
This was like a husband and
wife living in two separate houses.
We believe in interface-

out their problems together.
The results seem to be proving
us right. We call it "total
systems architecture."
We believe the programmer
must get involved with the total

people synergize with each other,
There are conflicts, but it's
producing results. For instance,
we are already a generation
ahead of the major competitor
in time-sharing systems.

I

,I n o Le nearing, 1ns is i yers was prominent in b.DS; in country. j
U OF M ME NS 8:30 P.M.
LE ECLUBTICKET SALES AT HILL BOX OFFICE
AP R I L 3H1. Block Ticket Sales March 24-26
General Ticket Sales March 30-April 3
L A DTOTickets Prices: $3, $250, $2
UM U OFM
M E N S G L EE C MAIL ORDERS TO:
U of M Mens Glee Club
L U B A P R I L 3 6048 Administration Bldg.
HILL AUDITORI Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104
PHONE 764-7265
UMU F

programmers and engineers work problem-software and hardware There are other benefits. We

so

A CHANGE IN ANN ARBOR
THURSDAY, MARCH 19TH
STUDENTS
INTERNATIONAL
will open its community

I

STORE
SPECIALS FOR' THE VERNAL EQUINOX
THURSDAY & FRIDAY, MARCH 19/20
RECORDS $2.99
(Retail Price $4.98)
Students International wants to serve the community
We need your support to make this happen.
Music is a beginning

I

44

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I

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