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March 19, 1970 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-19

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Page Six

TH'E MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, March 19, 1970

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, March 19, 1970

.. ..

a __

NB' CONTENDERS ALL WIN:
NBA's East wins toss

-~ ~Th.

>. , n
, , y.

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for first draft choice

NEW YORK (R) - Either the
Detroit Pistons or the Boston
Celtics, battling for last-place in
the National Basketball Associa-
tion's Eastern Division, will get the
No. 1 pick in the NBA's collegiate
draft.
The Eastern Division won t h e
coin-flip for the No. 1 selection
Wednesday at a hastily summoned
news conference conducted by
NBA Commissioner Walter Ken-
nedy.
DETROIT IS currently in t he
Eastern cellar. Boston, which play-
ed at Phoenix Wednesday night, is
11/2 games out of last place. The
Pistons have three games left,
with San Diego, Los Angeles and
Atlanta. Boston's final foes are
Phoenix, Seattle and New York.
NBA play concludes Sunday and
the draft will be conducted Mon-
day in New York.
A long-distance telephone c on-
ference call linked Kennedy with
Detroit, Boston and San Diego,
which has already clinched I a s t
place in the West.
THE PISTONS and the Celtics'
both need a big man and this
means that All-American Bob Lan-
ier of St. Bonaventure could be the
No. 1 pick.
The 6-foot-11, 275-pound giant
underwent surgery earlier this
week to repair torn ligaments in
his right knee which he injured
last Saturday in the NCAA East-
ern Regional championship game.
S Thehulking Lanier is expected
to recover completely from t h e
surgery.
Robert Rreitburd of the San
Diego Rockets called tails and then

Kennedy said: "Gentlemen, I'm
going to flip a quarter."'
It came up heads.
THE NBA EARLIER this week'
advanced the draft to March 23,
obviously in an attempt to catch
up with the rival American Bas-'
ketball Association, which conduct-
ed the first four rounds of its draft
some time ago. ABA teams have
already signed three of their No. 1a
selections.
Kennedy said the other NBA
teams would draft in the inverse'
order of their percentage stand-
ings.
The four new ABA members -
Houston, Buffalo, Cleveland and
Portland - will draft seventh,
eighth, ninth and tenth in t h e
first round but the particular or-
der probably won't be decided un-
til Monday.

I s
Wings
By The Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS - The Detroit:
Red Wings used two quick bursts
of power in the second and third
periods last night to overwhelm
Minnesota and maintain their grip
on third place inthe torrid East-
ern Division race in the National
Hockey League.
The Red Wings spotted the North
Stars a first period power play
goal, scored by Dan Grant at 7:04,
and were listless for the remainder
of the period.
But Detroit came to life early
in the second period when Minne-1
sota had the man advantage. Alex
Delvecchio picked up a loose puck
at center ice and passed ahead to
Frank Mahovlich, who had brok-
en behind everyone. Mahovlich put
the puck past veteran goalie Gump
Worsley at 4:50.

1
M

flatten

Norstars

Three minutes later, W a y n e H ks ooed their goalie, Al Smith, in fay-
Connally picked up a loose puck or of a sixth attacker.
in front of Worsley and poked it TORONTO - Bobby Hull slam-Bu'sh
over him to give the Wings a 2-1 med home Chicago's first two Balon set up Nevin's goal when
lead, and Gordie Howe got his goals, then set up three others asg he carried the puck down th he
24thgoa oftheseasn afewmm-the surging Black Hawks trounced right lane and faked a shot to pull
24th goal of the season a few min- esurging BlkH ktrnd mith to one side. He then flipped
utes later on an assist from Ma- Toronto 7-4 last night and climb- Smi the puck across ice to Nevin who
hovlich. ed within one point of first place soe aiy
in the National Hockey League's scored easily.
Gary Unger brought the Wings East Division. The Penguins had a chance to
to life in a temporarily lethargic It was the Hawks' third con- break the scoreless tie in the
third period as he scored on an secutive victory and stretched second period when Keith Mc-
assist from Mahovlich while Min- their unbeaten string to eight Creary was awarded a penalty
nesota was changing on the fly. games - seven wins and a tie. shot after being hooked from be-
On the ensuing face-off, Nick Li- First-place Boston was. idle Wed- hind on a solo dash against goalie
bitt blasted a slap shot past a sur- nesday night. Ed Giasomin.
prised Worsley to ice the game. Hull's linemates, Chico Maki McCreary took the puck in and
The win kept the Wings in third and Lou Angotti, also played key faked the Ranger goalie but then
place in the East, a mere one point roles in the triumph. Maki scored hit the post, preserving the shut-
ahead of New York Rangers, who a goal and assisted on three others out. Later, Ron Schock also hit
also won. The Wings stayed a while Angotti's power play goal a post for the Penguins.
mere two points behind second at 5:19 of the 'second period snap-
place Chicago and moved to within ped a 3-all tie and put the Hawks
three points of pacesetter Boston. in front to stay.
Hull scored his 33rd and 34th LIV
OY goals of the season'2' 2minutes' LvLy" sal
L ~apart midway through the f i r s t,
period after Floyd Smith had giv-
en the Leafs a 1-0 lead. Paul Hen- goes w ild
y Beson knotted it for Toronto late
rformtance mhe period and Chicago's J i mb
Pappin and Ron Ellis of the Leafs Iy The Associated Press
traded goals early in the second As part of a continuing at-
by Alicia Dever, Kay Hoyer, and period before Angotti's tie-break- tempt to liven up the game of
Nancy Shower. er, the Hawks' third power play baseball, Commissioner Bowie
Two teams of eight girls a r e of the game. Kuhn has instructed all major

AQUATIC ARTISTR
Michifish prepare pe

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By TERRI FOUCHEY
While the competitive s w i m
team is going to its nationals, the
other women's swim team on cam-
pus, Michifish - the synchroni-
zed swim team, is having its big
splash this weekend also. However,
unlike their competitive swimming
sisters the girls in Michifish
aren't taking part in any national
competition. Their big splash is
the annual Michifish show.
The show will be presented
starrting tonight at the Women's
Pool at 8:15 p.m. and will also be
given on Friday and Saturday
nights. Tickets for the show are
$1.25 and can be obtained at the
Women's Pool, at the door, or by
calling 764-9450.
The theme for this year's show
is "People". As coach Joyce Linde-
mann states, "What we are try-
KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR!
* NO WAITING
0 8 BARBERS
0 OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
Arborland-Campus
Maple Viiaoe

ing to present is the unique char-
acteristics of man."
The thirty members of Michi-
fish have choreographes numbers
involving teams of eight, duets and
solos in order to demonstrate the
different characteristics. The girls
have been working since January
on routines to fit the selected
themes and on their costumes. .
One of the solos features Jean
Labounty presenting her interpre-
tation of man's tragedy. Miss La-
Bounty later teams, with Sue Eng-
lish in a duet showing communi-
cation between men.
Another duet with the theme of
violence in the world features Jil
Beelan and Ann Fredricks, t h e
Michifish club officers.'
Fatalism and superstition and
their effects on men and the world
are interpreted in a trio number

taking part in the show. One team
is interpreting tradition as shown
through folk music. The o t h e r
team is trying to capture the ad-
venturotis aspects of man.
Synchronized swimimng is often
compared to modern dance and
figure skating. Each girl creates
her own impression of the music
and works first on this. Later she
will synchronize her interpretation
with the other members of her
routine.
Speed is the most important
factor involved in competitive
swiming. For synchronized swim-
ming the basic skills differ great-
ly. Endurance is most important
and the girls must know all the
strokes. This knowledge of all the
strokes must be applied while'
swimming withbthe head outhof
the water. Synchronized swim-
ming also compares to diving in
that the girls learn stunts involv-
ing a certain degree of difficulty.

* *' *
Rangers romp
PITTSBURGH - Bob Nevin
scored the 200th goal of his Na-
tional Hockey League career ear-
ly in the final period to lead theI
New York Rangers to a 2-0 victory
over the Pittsburgh Penguins last
night.I
The victory was the first for the
slump-ridden Rangers since Feb.
25. They had gone winless in nine
games.
The second New York goal was
scored by Dave Balon in the clos-
ing seconds after the Penguins lift-

league teams to test an experi-
mental, 5 per cent souped up
baseball every Wednesday.
Yesterday was second day of
experiment with the ball and
the result were phenomenal. In
nine afternoon games an aver-
age of 19 runs per game were
scored and dozens balls flew
out of the park.
Examples of the difference
made by the super-ball were
such scores as 18-13, 19-14, 19-
13 and individual performances
like light-hitting Eddie Brink-
man's 450-foot homer.

.ar, .,, 9n .,w.. :

HIGH SCHOOL TOURNEY:
Pontiac wins thriller

. i

Scores

:

Exhibition Baseball
Boston 6, Philadelphia 5
Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 2
Washington 18, Kansas City 13, 11 in-
nings
Detroit 19, Chicago, A 13
Los Angeles 8, Minnesota 2
Houston 10, Cincinnati 5
Seattle 19, Cleveland 14
Chicago N 12, Oakland 11
San Diego S, California 5
New York A 8, New York N 1
Atlanta 7, Montreal 5
Baltimore at Mexico City, night

The girls in Michifish work out
at least three hours weekly and if
they are part of several routines
(which the majority are) their
practice time may take up to 10
hours.
This weekend's show consists
mainly of synchronized swim acts
the members. In addition to these
the men's diving team is perform-
ing a comedy act.

By AL SHACKELFORD'
God must have written t h e
script.
Pontiac Central, the number
one-rated team in Michigan, edg-
ed Detroit Kettering 75-72 1 a s t
night at Crisler Arena when Bill
Glover'hit a floor-length bomb as
time ran out.
Campy Russell fired in 32 points
and grabbed 16 rebounds to lead
Central to their amazing win. Rus-
sell, perhaps the finest prep play-

U

Professional Standingsr

SAVI NGS,

FROM

New York
Milwaukee
Baltimore
Philadelphi
Cincinnati
xBoston
Detroit
Atlanta
xLos Angel
Chicago
Phoenix
Seattle
San Franci
San Diego
x-Late g

N B A
Eastern Division
W L i
60 19
55 25 .
48 32.
a 41 39.
35, 454
32 46
31 48
Western Division
416 34
es 44 35.
38 42 d
36 43 .
35 45 .
sco 29 50.
26 53.
ame not included.

Pct.
.760
.688
.600
.513
.438
.410
.392
.575
.557
.475
.456
.438
.367
.329

GB
6
12%
19%
25%
271f2
29
8
91/
11
16Y,
191/2

STUDENTS

INTERNATIONAL

NHL
East Division
W L T Pt. GF GA
Boston 35 15 17 87 245 193
Chicago 39 20 8 86 221 155
Detroit 36 18 13 85 213 172
New York 35 19 14 84 223 165
xMontreal 33 19 14 80 213 170
Toronto 27 28 12 66 206 217
West Division
St. Louis 33 24 10 16 204 164
Pittsburgh 23 33 11 57 159 210
Philadelphia 16 26 23 55 186 205
Minnesota 14 32 21 49 196 234
xOakland 18 37 11 47 144 215
Los Angeles 11 47 10 32 152 262
x-Late game not included
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 7, Toronto 4
New York 2, Pittsburgh 0
Detroit 6, Minnesota 2
Montreal at Oakland, inc.
Thursday's Games
Montreal at Los Angeles
New York at Philadelphia
Chicago at Boston
Pittsburgh at St. Louis

er in the nation, was forced to the
sidelines with an injured ankle
late in the third quarter but came
back a few minutes later to lead
his team to victory.
The game had been billed be-A,
forehand as Michigan's best of the
year and a showdown between
Russell and fine Kettering All-
state center Lindsay Hairston. But
Campy dominated Hairston, hold-
ing him down to 18 points and ten
rebounds; even many of the points
Hairston scored were made when
Campy was in the locker room
nursing his ankle.
As spectator (and part-time All-
American grid star) Jim Mandich
said during the game, ,"Canpy
may become the greatest Russell
of them all." Bill and Cazzie, be-
ware.
Pontiac raced to a 43-34 halftime
lead behin Russell's 22 points and
additional good shooting from for-
wards Jerry Ratliff and Monte
Herring. The game had seesawed
most of the .way before the mighty
Chiefs broke into a 39-29 lead.
Kettering fought bock doggedly
to go ahead 56-55 at 1:22 of the '4
third quarter on Hairston's tip.
The game stayed close the rest
of the way, but a pair of free
throws by Ratliff and Glover's
amazing shot clinched Pontiac's
win.
In an earlier class "A" quarter-
final game, Detroit Pershing par-
layed superior height and the fine
ballhandling of guard Phil Paige
into a 73-61 victory over Dearborn
Fordson.
Doughboy center Calvin Harper
netter 24 points and led his team
to a 48-28 advantage on the
boards. Smooth forward S t e v e
Burke scored 26 points for t h e
losing Tractors, but was held down
well in the second half by Persh-
ing's ace sophomore Bob Hawkins.

Yesterday's Results
Philadelphia 119, Baltimore 113
Milwaukee 116, New York 108,
Boston at Los Angeles, Inc.
Thursday's Games
Boston at Phoenix
Detroit at San Diego

ON RECORDS
Students International a n n o u n ce s the
opening of the S.I. General Store with this
special offer
ALL $4.98 ALBUMS
ON SALE NOW
FOR, JUST

ON TRAVEL
1970 Summer Jet Flight Schedule
DETROIT METRO DEPARTURES

I

To
London 2
London 3
London 4
London 5
London 6

Depart
May 4
May 5
May 15
June 21
June 26
May 6
July 16
July 5
July 12

Weeks Return
5 June 9
7 June 25
12 Aug. 20
8 Sept. 2
8 Aug. 26
7 June 23
6 Aug. 31
8 Aug. 8
3 July 31

Cost
$189
199
219
229
229
169
419
239
259

Paris
Japan
London
London

10
11

NEW YORK DEPARTURES

London 7
London 8
London 9

May 5
May 17
June 14

7 June 24
13 A ug. 14
6 July 22

189
199
189

fS
}"}. ji}f I

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