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March 17, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-17

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UNIVERSITY LECTURES IN JOURNALISM
present
J. ANTHONY LUCAS
Pulitzer-Prize Winning Reporter
The New York Times
REPORTING THE "TRUTH" OF THE
CHICAGO CONSPIRACY TRIAL
4:10 P.M.--WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18
Raekhami LectureBlil
WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, and FRIDAY
March 18th, 19th, and 20th
Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre
PRESENTS
LOVE'S THE BEST DOCTOR
by MOLIERE
THE. CRITIC
by RICHARD SHERIDAN'
Arena Theatre, Frieze Building
ADMISSION FREE-Promptly at'4:10 P.M.

page three

414 P

Siriogan

43 a4O
t

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Tuesday, March 17, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

CShT
By LARRY LEMPERT
Daily News Analysis
"Students are perfectly capable' of
governing themselves," says Ed Kussy,
chairman of Central Student Judic-
iary (CSJ). "They are closer to the is-
sues and can do a much more thor-
ough job than faculty or administra-
tors.'
This is the premise that underlies
CSJ, a body that has been feeling its
muscles since it succeeded Joint Ju-
diciary Council as t h e University's
highest student court in the fall of
1968.
Since all of CSJ's powers stem from
the Student Government Council Con-
stitution, approved in March 1969 by
SGC but not yet approved by the Re-
gents, the authority by which CSJ op-
erates remains in question. However,

he governing

body for students?

by recently referring several cases to
CSJ - two cases of disruption against
SDS and a similar case against nine
LSA students - the University ad-
ministration seems to imply a recog-
nition of CSJ's authority, at least in
certain areas.
As organized by the CSJ Manual of
Procedure, an outgrowth of the SGC
Constitution, CSJ handles cases rang-
ing from window breakings in dorm-
itories to recruiter protests.
CSJ becomes involved in cases only
when students and student-made rules
are involved. In such cases, CSJ is
the "highest appellate judicial body,"
although an individual convicted by
CSJ can appeal his case to President
Robben Fleming.
According to present University by-
laws, howvever, the faculty-dominated

administrative bodies of the schools
and colleges are empowered to make
decisions relating to students' aca-
demic and nonacademic conduct, un-
der their own sets of rules.
Under the proposed Regents bylaws
on student role in decision-making,
college bodies ruling on non-academic
cases would be composed entirely of
students, and CSJ would act as an
appellate court. The bylaws are cur-
rently under consideration by the Re-
gents.
The CSJ Manual of Procedure states
that any student convicted for viola-
tion of non-academic regulation may
appeal his case to CSJ on grounds of
absence of judicial fairness or due
process.
Under its constitution SGC makes
the regulations and has the power to

create any number of lower student
judiciaries. Decisions by these bodies,
as well as by dormitory judiciary bod-
ies can be appealed before CSJ.
"In cases of original jurisdiction,"
according to the manual, "any mem-
ber of the University Community sub-
stantially affected by the alleged mis-
conduct of a student, group of stu-
dents, or student organization, may
bring a case before the Judiciary."
In a case of this type a pre-trial
hearing is held at which charges are
clarified and the plaintiffs make a
preliminary presentation.
If CSJ determines the evidence is
sufficient, a full hearing is scheduled.
Hearings, unless otherwise - requested
by the defendant, are open to the
public.
If the violated regulations establish

FOX EATEN THEARES i 1
FOR VILLGE
375 No MAPLE RD.-7691300

LAST TIME TODAY
"DUNWICH HORROR"
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a penalty of suspension or expulsion
of a student, the defendant is entitled
to a jury trial. Three CSJ members
would preside over the hearings, with
a jury composed of five students se-
lected at random from the student di-
rectory.
At present, there are no violations
that establish such a penalty. In cases
of current regulations CSJ may "only
warn a student or fine him not more
than $50," according to the SGC Con-
stitution; if a student organization is
involved, CSJ "may only warn the
organization, curtail its activities for
some specified length of time not to
exceed four months, or, f i n e it not
more than $250.
Chairman Kussy, of the Law School
See CSJ, Page 8
Court'
upholds
auto case
Refuses to reopen.
federal'appeal
on car pollution

* STARTS TOMORROW *
CHILDREN'S PRICE AT ALL SHOWS

"Dazzling!
Avivid
experience.
thrilling! A
cliffhanger
in space!"
-L.A. Times

r:'A f"F . . .CWSURGEaiBoa.. :....T .:. :....N
M ~R>:: 6=D

L

.-

TIMES-il:30-4:,00-6:45-9:20

....m...m.

DIAL 5-6290
A FRANKOVCM PRODUCTION
~wI mno
MOW Orrfl!
Academy Award
Nominee
(Best Supportinq
Actress)

THE FUN STARTS AT
1:10 - 3 -5 -7-9 p.m.

Extra: Academy Nominee
Best Short:
"People Soup"

the
news today
by The Associated Press and Collelge Press Service
SENATE DEBATE on the Supreme Court nomination of G.
Harrold Carswell began yesterday.
Republican leader Hugh Scott defended President Nixon's nom-
inee but conceded that foes of the nomination may have gained
some strength.
The Pennsylvania senator told newsmen opponents of the nom-
ination have gained among Democrats and may have more than 30
votes now.
But, he added, the Republicans are holding much better in sup-
port of Carswell than they did last November, when Republicans pro-
vided the decisive votes to defeat Nixon's earlier nominee, Clement
F. Haynsworth Jr.
* * *
RALPH NADER'S investigators yesterday told Congress the
Interstate Commerce Commission in its present form should be
abolished.
The seven-man team of "Nader's Raiders" said the ICC is a tool of
the transportation industry and a refuge for political hacks.
Speaking before a Senate subcommittee, the team testified the
commission should be abolished "so that the American people will no
longer be under any illusions about who is controlling the transporta-
tion system of our nation-the rail, motor, water, and pipeline in-
dustries, their rate bureaus and their trade associations."
They urged Congress to write anew Interstate Commerce Act
with a new regulatory agency covering. all forms of transportation.
II. RAP BROWN'S trial was postponed for eight days.
In Eel Air, Maryland, Circuit Court Judge Harry Dyer Jr. granted
the postponement yesterday and ordered the defendant to be present
when the trial resumes.
Brown is charged with arson and inciting to riot.
Defense Attorney William M. Kunstler had asked for an indefinite:
postponement, saying Brown could not receive a fair trial so soon
after two separate bombings within 24 hours in Maryland. Two of
Brown's friends were killed a week ago by the accidental detonation of
explosives they were transporting.
THE STATE DEPARTMENT yesterday said it would validate
passports to travel to Communist China for everybody. with a
"legitimate purpose."
The easing of regulations permits a greater number of groups toI
be granted passports for travel to China than was previously allowed.
! Officials noted that the Chinese thus far have issued virtually
no visas to Americans and there was no way of predicting whether
Peking will change its attitude in this respect.
* * *z
SOUTH VIETNAM'S National Assembly yesterday passed a
land reform bill which its supporters claim will make every
peasant owner of the land he farms.
The bill was substantially the same as the one sent to the
National Assembly by Thieu last July. It provides that the landlord
can retain only land he personally tills, up to a maximum of 37
acres. All other land, according to the bill, will be taken over by the
government for redistribution.
Landlords will be compensated, 20 per cent cash and 80 per
cent in eight-year bonds paying 10 per cent interest. Landlords have
said they oppose the measure because they doubt the value of the
government's bonds.
The United States has pledged $10 million in support of the
program. About three million acres of privately owned land would

-Associated Press
Maddox runs again
Georgia's Governor Lester Maddox announces he will be a candidate for Lieutenant Governor in
this year's election and that his wife, Virginia (right), will not be a candidate for governor. Mad-
dox made the announcement during a press conference at the state capitol.
PROBLEM SOLVER":
Education center designed to
continue women's schooling

By The Associated Press
The Supreme. Court yester-
day refused to reopen an an-
titrust suit against major auto
manufacturers over air pol-
lution devices.
In another major action, the
court rejected a plea that it rein-
state a plan to bus thousands of
school children across the city of
Charlotte, N.C., to speed deseg-
regation.
The government had charged
the ;nation's biggest auto makers
with conspiring to delay and ob-
struct development of auto air-
pollution control devices.
In a consent decree, upheld in
October by Federal Judge Jesse
W. Curtis of Los Angeles, th e
manufacturers agreed to cease
the alleged illegal actions without
admitting guilt to the charges.
New York City had appealed to
the high court to reopen the anti-
trust suit, claiming if the allega-
tions were true the auto makers
had endangered the h e a 1 t h of
millions of people. But the high
court declined, and without hold-
ing a hearing affirmed Judge Cur-
tis' ruling.
The suit was directed against
General Motors, Ford, Chrysler,
American Motors and the Auto-
mobile Manufacturers Associa-
tion.
The Court's ruling on busing in
Charlotte was given without am-
plification. The original busing
order was entered by federal
Judge James B. McMillan of
Charlotte but was later stayed by
an appellate court.
In effect, thehSupreme Court's
ruling nheans the busing p 1 a n
probably will not be implemented
during this school term. Dr. Wil-
liam Self, superintendent 'of
Charlotte - Mecklenburg County
schools, said Monday it is "ex-
tremely doubtful" t he school
board would have time to acquire
the needed buses and make reas-
signments by the end of the term
if the appeals court and the Su-
preme Court uphold the busing
order.

ROBERTREDFORDj GENE HA CKMA N
CM LLA SPARV 'DOWNHILL RACER
WNWA G.A~I Aa pj('~jgJAMSSat~R o"
TCMkAMt. prrAnTIE I7V,

SO F FPTH POuM
FIFTH AVENUE AT LIUERTY
D11 OWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
LJ.IINFORMATION 761-9700
doors open at 7:00
shows-7:10-9:00

By PETER MILLER
Some 2,300 women can't bei
wrong. That's how many havej
gone to the Center for Continuing,
Education of Women in the past
five years to get help in going to
college or getting a job.;
"The problems of women re-]
turning to school are unique," says
Jean W. Campbell, the center's]
director. There are the practical
problems of scheduling classes,
cutting university red-tape, andi
getting financial assistance. But,
Wilson fell

in addition, she explains, women
whose education was interrupted
by marriage and children often
are plagued with self-doubts.
The center, which was created
in 1964, has three major functions,
according to Mrs. Campbell:
pointing out obstacles and pos-
sibilities to women who desir'e em-
ployment or m a r e education,
facilitating the women's return to
school, and acting as an instru-
ment of change within the Uni-
versity.
cb Js

5 Academy Award
Nominations,
including
Best Picture

But the center is not a "back-
door to privilege," Mrs. Campbell
insists. Women accepted into the
University through the center
must meet the necessary admis-
sion requirements. Most of these
women are planning careers in
education or the social sciences.
Those whose best interest would
not be served by a university edu-
cation, says Mrs. Campbell, are re-
ferred to junior colleges.
"We are a counselling service,"
Mrs. Campbell says, "we show the
possibilities." These she says, in-
clude the following.
-The University admissions of-'
fice has agreed to admit women
resuming an educational program
through the center "when there is,
reasonable probability of success
in University courses";
-A recent Civil Service Com-
missionprogram, offering part-
time employment to qualified
.women, is due in part to the cen-
ter, efforts;
-A. special evening credit course
for women is now being offered in
the married student housing area
of North Campus;
--Opportunities for r e d u c e d

T T -L-..kR--; .' 1.L .LN/.m i VT k7 j L
winners announced

Twenty-seven University sen-)

be covered by the bill. iors have been named winners in
The bill has been sent to President Nguyen Van Thieu. He may the 1970 Woodrow Wilson Fellow-
sign the bill, take no action (in which case the bill will automatically ship competition. The program is
become law), or amend the bill and return it to the National As. aimed at identifying and support-
b:P Iing future college teachers.

frey Stern, Stephen Welkom, Guy
Cooper, Leonard Krisak, and Mrs.
Nancy Muchnick.
Margery Baker, Harvey Rosen,
and Michael Kennedy a r e eco-
nomics majors. In political science
are David Cohen, Douglas Dailey,
and Dennis Goldford.

sem ay.
CAMBODIAN YOUTHS yesterday renewed demands for the
withdrawal of North Vietnamese and NLF troops from Cambodia.
In a protest before the National Assembly in Phnom Penh, more
than 20,000 youths marched, denounced the NLF in speeches, and
then dispersed quietly.
The demonstration followed the ransacking by youths last
Wednesday of the NLF and North Vietnamese embassies in Viettiane.
The Cambodian government set a deadline of dawn last Sunday for
the withdrawal of all North Vietnamese and NLF forces in Cambodia.
U.S. officials in South Vietnam said they saw no sign that the
40,000-60,000 Viet Cong or North Vietnamese had left their Cambodian
sanctuaries, from which they have been launching or directing attacks
against U.S.. and South Vietnamese troops.

GPI Now at the CAMPUS Theatre
DIAL 8-6416

Michigan's share of the f,,153
winners is the second largest in
the country.
The Woodrow Wilson designates
are "the most intellectually prom-
ising 1970 graduates planning
college teaching careers" said
Hans Rosenhaupt, president of
the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.
This year's winners were chosen
competitively from some 12,000
seniors who had been nominated
by 800 colleges.
Winners who are English ma-
jors include Ellen Aprill, Law-
rence Joseph, Mark Madoff, Jef-

Other winners include musico- course loads are available for
logy majors Kay Kaufman a n d women who cannot become full
Paul Rapoport, history majors, time students, because of family
Alvin Sallen, Isabel Hull, and obligations.
Mark Wheeler. Most of the women interviewed
by the center are between the ages
Also named winners were Laura of 30 and 50. While most of them
mJohnsonGerman,dRe Scotare career-oriented, those women
mathematics, A nd r ew Maszak, who seek "personal enrichment"
classics, Kenneth Tiews, philoso- are also counselled, Mrs. Cambell
phy, Frances Trix; Near Eastern says.
languages, and John W. Suggs,' Pamphlets, paperback books, and
chemistry. newsletters produced by the cen-
Michael Montague, biology,- ma- ter give women information on
jor at the University's Flint Col- employment opportunities a n d
lege, also earned a designation. He educational programs. Speakers,
is Flint College's first Woodrow conferences, and discussion groups
Wilson fellow. provide additional help.

Self is going ahead with plans
to implement another part of Mc-
Millan's plan which orders the de-
segregation of 30 schools by re-
zoning. The stay does not affect
that portion of the judge's order.
Prior to yesterday's ruling the
court rarely rejected appeals or
pleas made by civil rights lawyers
in school cases. Earlier this term
the court ordered desegregation of
schools in 30 Mississippi districts.
in 14 other Southern.districts, in
Oklahoma City and in Memphis.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year, Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier. $3.00 by
mail.

r-

...
.:

1

OPENS TOMORROW!
N. Y. Drama (ritis'Circle Award 1968-
SEASON'S BEST MUSICAL
BRIGHTEST
OUR0IRLO E,. CMED
AJ CHEERFUL, E
g~rssF~Y IR VE

RADICAL FILM SERIES
PRESENTS
Rene Clement's Anti-war Masterpiece
FORBIDDEN GAMES,
Two young French children, during the German occupation, imi-
tate the cruel adult life that surrounds them. . . . Few films have

U FM MENS' 8:30 P.M.
G LOE EMC L U B TICKETSALESATHILLBOXOFFICE
AP R I L 3 H I Block Ticket Sales March 24-26
I L AUII TO-R" I General Ticket Sales March 30-April 3

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