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March 14, 1970 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-14

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 141 1970

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, March 141 1970

ENACT SEMINAR:
Journalists discuss
media, environment
By SUSAN LINDEN
"Imagine the impact that the media could have by boy-
cotting advertisements of all polluting companies," said Ed-
ward P. Morgan of ABC News, urging all media and stu-
dents to press President Nixon to take stronger actions to
save the environment.
Morgan was among four participants yesterday at a
seminar entitled "The Media and the Environment" which
was sponsored by the journalism department in connection
with the ENACT teach-in.
The other participants w e r e
Hays ~favos obe rt Cahn, a member of the
President's Council on Environ-
ment Quality, Gladwin Hill, na-
111T e tional environment correspondent
rul e IIIAha'ii e of the New York Times, and Doug
Fulton, who reports on environ-
(Contiried fromPage 1) mental issues for the Ann Arbor
curriculum committee is author- News.
~urrized u ommiee rs aut1or All four were critical of the
ized to approve new courses. media for its past disinterest in
Most of the departmental cur- the environment.
riculum committees have voting "An alliance between the press
student members, and the eight- and the academic world is the
member college-wide body seats only thing that will save us," said
two students with full voting Morgan. "You are in the theater
privileges..of ideas and controversy, while the
In Hays' 'view, college policy media is trying to cover all valid
should call for students to be aspects of on-campus and off-
seated on all bodies which make a campus andoff-
curricular decisions, but these un- campns activity."
its ouldrema compsed rf- Morgan went on to discuss the
Its would remai composed pri- emergence of the media as big
marily of faculty members, business, and its subsequent pow-
The views presented by Hays er to penetrate issues and expose
are not likely to find favor with contradictions.
S t u d e n t Government Council, Hill said the biggest problem of
which, for the past four years, has environmental reporting is how
been attempting to get official to communicate the seriousness of
recognition of what they consider the issues to the general public so
the students rights to trial by that people can become more in-
courts composed entirely of stu- volved in the fight to save the en-
dents, under rules approved by the vironment.
student body or its representatives. Several members of the audience
These concepts were endorsed questioned the ability of the
last summer by Senate Assembly, President's council to create a
the faculty representative body. meaningful impact on the public.
when they ap~proved a set of pro- Cahn re ponded that he had been
posed Regents bylaws which call- a councjll member for only one
ed for the changes desired by SGC. month and was not yet able to
However, the regental drafts of judge this.
the bylaws eliminated a provision A writer from the Ann Arbor
which would have, delegated the Argus criticized the media for
power to make rules governing not allowing the involvement of
non-academic student conduct to underground papers in the issue.
"appropriate student governments' Fulton and Morgan responded by
-such as might be formed in a voicing their dissatisfaction with
school or college, or in a residence what they called a lack of facts in
hall, underground writing.
2500 hear lluskie anel
speak on environment

House subcommittee
holds hearing at 'U"

If you need child core facilities
or are interested in working to
establish them--
COME TO A
MASS MEETING
Sunday, March 15
2:00 P.M.
St. Andrew's Church
(provisions will be made to care
for children of those attending)

By HSTER PULLING
The U.S. House of Represent-
atives subcommittee on conser-
vation and natural resources
held a public hearing yesterday
at the Michigan Union as part
of ENACT's teach-in program.
"This is the first time con-
gress has come to a campus to
listenhto students," Rep. J im
Wright (D-Texas) said.
Other members of the com-
fittee were Chairman Henry
Reuss (D-Wis.), Rep. Paul Mc-
Closkey (R-Calif.), a n d Rep.
Guy Vander Jagt (R-Mich.).
Also invited to participate
were, from Ann Arbor, R e p.
Marvin Esch, a Republican
from Ann Arbor, and Rep. John
Dingell, a Democrat from De-
troit.
Dennis Hayes, t h e national
coordinator of the environmen-
tal Teach-in was the first wit-
ness to make a presentation be-
fore the committee.
Hayes attacked the nation's
expressions of concern for pol-
lution within the country while
simultaniously "making Viet-
nam an ecological catastrophy."
"We cannot be concerned with
the environment of this nation
while p u r s u i n g destruction
elsewhere," Hayes said.
Rep. Reuss commented that
Hayes's assessment of politic-
ians was "not unfair. Only re-
cently, have I understood that
ecology involves areas ranging
from the ghetto to the w/ar."
A three member panel repre-
senting Zero Population Con-
trol gave their testimony next.
Garrett De Bell, editor of the
Environmental Handbook, spoke
out against the over-consump-
tion of the U.S. public. "Amer-
ica consumes more than 50 per
cent of the world's goods while
containing only six per cent of
the population," he said.
Dina Zvenko then spoke on

how over - population affects
women.
"Twenty-five years ago there
were 30,000- legal abortions in
the United States, now there
are only 8,000. Notronlysare wo-
men being more repressed,' but
they are also being forced to
contribute to over-population,"
Miss Zvenko said.
"We don't want reform - but
complete abortion repeal," she
added. "Many people don't real-
ize that m o s t women getting
abortions already have one or
two children."
After Miss Zvenko's presenta-
tion, several members of Wo-
mens Liberation sitting in the
audience arose and "hexed" the
congressmen.
Chanting in unison, they de-
scribed the different methods
women have been forced to use
because of present abortion
laws. "Rot with clorox, bleeds
from pins; Jam the rusty hang-
ers in . . . Those murdered wo-
men were cursed for their sex;
Congressmen - for you we've
made this hex."
Rojer Conner, speaking f o r
the epvironmental law society
of th law school warned the
subcommittee of t h e "gaining
power of the new left on cam-
pus."
"You have to realize t h a t
more and more people are be-
lieving that. corporations and
big businesses a r e responsible
for the pollution problem and
that these firms are not willing
to help," Conner said. "These
people are getting more a n d
more disatisfied with the sys-
tem."
"Many of us. too, feel that
perhaps the first place to clean
up our environment is within
the Congress," Rep. Esch said
in response to Conner. "We need
to clean up our procedures and
make them more relevant to the
needs of the country."

ar
S G C -, IO N.
4 ",
Tuesday & Wednesday, March 24-25
President-Vice-President
5 Council Seats
Board in Control of Student Publications
" Board in Control of Intercollegiate, Athletics
- Advisory Committee on Recreation, Intramurals, Club Sports
a4
VOTE
4,--

I"

±!.!

iso
"
a
,+
S t
"

~9r

eelf

I HAVE A PLACE
FOR YOU TO LIVE!
FOR NOW, THE SUMMER OR
THE FALL . . . WON'T YOU
COME IN?
STUDENT
LIVING
QUARTERS

What 'The
khllc( I leeq'4 7kiw
4'i// 6e here
the V. ojilL m=Ma 9e=e Cri
at Lil Atditoriunn
L 0.230 PMd

"*

r'1

Israeli Dance Instructress
will lead
ISRAELI FOLK DANCING
SUNDAY, MARCH 15 at 6:15
following DELI HOUSE
at THE HOUSE
1429 HILL ST.

(Continued from Page 1)
pollution. Doan said Dow would
continue to provide the herbicides.
He claimed the company was
testing its own products "ex-
haustively"' and' that Dow had
spent $4 million to reduce a con-
.taminant in a herbicide that was
dangerous.
Bookchin asked the audience to
reconsider their premises and as-
sumptions concerning the causes
of environmental decay.;
"A phony kind of original sin is
being created in which machines
and men are blamed for the crisis
Draft ruling
may change
status of grads
(Continued from Page 1)
30 days," he added. "We postponed
action on all cases affected by the
then-pending decision when it was
filed last 'July, .and we will con-
tinue to postpone decisions on
similar cases."
Law Prof. Charles Donahue, Jr.,
along with Detroit attorney Marc
Stickgold, represented the stu-
dents. Donahue said yesterday
that the Smith opinion is "the first
case in the country so far as I
know, involving the issue of the
III-A deferment."
1421 Hill St.
761-1451
8:30 $1.25
THIS WEEKEND
folk legacy
rec. artist
#ROSALIE
SORRELS
is here
at last
"better than the Mex-
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-U.UTAH PHILLIPS
TONIGHT

caused by our basic social truc-
ture," he explained.
Cole warned that there is evi-
dence that man's misuse of the
land is increasing the size of many
deserts. He said that the Meso-
potamian and Saharan deserts
are, in part, man-made.
Cole attacked the concept of a
growth economy and criticize
universities for turning out engi-
neers who are "ecological ignor-
amuses."
The victim of the most vicious
heckling of the night, Reuther
said that Americans preach plati-
tudes but fail to live by them.
Urging a reordering of priorities,
he said the cause of environmen-
tal programsyis man, not science
or technology.
During the question session
Reuther affirmed that his union
would have demands of environ-
mental reform when tphey negoti-
ate next with auto manufacturers.,
Coale tried to dispell the belief
that population is the main cause
of environmental decay. The real
reasons, he said, are the growth
of the economy and "abuse of
technology:"

1217 S. UNIVERSITYv
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Open to University Students, Faculty, and Employees
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DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER SERIES
SUNDAY, MARCH 15-8:00 P.M.
DR. AMOS PERLMETTER
Prof. of History, Harvard. Univ. Center for International Studies.
Author of Nation Building in Israel-Roles of the Military and
Civilian
will speak on
"Military and Civilian Sectors-
Policy-Making in Israel"
TUESDAY, MARCH 17th
RICHARD RUBENSTEIN
"Death of God" Theologian. Charles E. Merrill Lecturer in the Hu-
manities at the Univ. of Pittsburgh. Au-thor of After Auschwitz
will discuss
"Israel: Radical Implication of

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