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March 14, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-14

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ALICE'S RESTAURANT
presents
SKRU
9 P.M.
ALICE LLOYD HALL
Pilot Program

page three

94 lB

Sk ti!tn

43 ttt

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PhONE: 764-0554

Saturday, March1 4, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

50c

DIAL 5-6290 ___

THE FUN STARTS AT
2:10- 3 -5 -.7 -9p.m.

A RAWNOvsc~i PAOOUJCTk
MtI1IHU BOhIUlMf
Academy Award
Nominee
(Best Supportinq
Actress)

Extra: Academy Nominee
Best Short:
"People Soup"

-W.C.FIELDS
-
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY MATINEES ONLY
"THE BANK DICK"
1:45-4:15
"NEVER GIVE A SUCKER AN EVEN BREAK"
3:00-5:30

the
newst
by The Associated Press and Col ege Press Service
THE CAMBODIAN GOVERNMENT yesterday told the Viet
Cong-North Vietnamese troops to get out of Cambodia before
dawn Sunday.
The ultimatum came in the form of a message delivered to the
Viet Cong and North Vietnamese as hundreds of Cambodians ram-
paged through the capital streets of Phnom Penh attacking Viet-
namese shops and houses.
Violent demonstrations against the presence of Viet Cong and
North Vietnamese troops in Cambodia have been taking place around
the country all week.
Prince Norodom Sikanouk announced that he would visit Moscow
and Peking to seek help in curbing Viet Cong and North Vietnamese
troop activities.
SEN. J: W. FULBRIGHT (D-Ark.) yesterday hailed the Nix-
on administration's decision to drop its opposition to repeal of
the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin resolution.
In a seven page letter to Fulbright, the State Department said
it "neither advocates nor opposes congressional action" on the reso-
lution by Sen. Charles Mathias (R-Md.) to terminate the Tonkin
resolution.
Fulbright predicted early Senate action on the Mathias pro-
posal.
The position by the- State Department is a reversal of previous
opposition to similar resolutions to repeal the Tonkin resolution.
The Gulf of Tonkin resolution allows the President to send troops
to Vietnam by executive order without congressional approval.
In addition to the Tonkin resolution, the Mathias proposal would
repeal the Cuban resolution of 1962, the Formosa resolution of 1955,
and the Middle East resolution of 1958, all of which authorize the
executive branch of the government to take whatever action it deem-
ed necessary to meet crises that were at the time occurring.
ISRAELI JETS yesterday flew deep into Egypt to bomb a
Soviet-built missile base.
Egyptian spokesmen reported five civilians killed plus 35 civilians
and five soldiers wounded when the Israeli planes pounded an anti-
aircraft installation at El Mansura, 45 miles west of the Suez Canal
and 70 miles north of Cairo.
It was the 15th air raid deep inside Egyptian territory this year.
Israelis said all the planes returned safely.
Israeli jets also continued short-range strikes across the canal'
and military spokesman in Amman said Jordanian and Israeli forces
exchanged machine gun fire for 10 minutes in the northern Jordan
Valley.
A STRIKE BY CITY EMPLOYES in San Francisco yesterday
halted public transportation, ,shut down many schools, and
crippled city services.
The strikers from five unions represent more than 7,000 nurses,
clerical workers, hospital housekeeping employes, social workers and
maintenance employes. Police and firemen are not affected.
Many of the other 7,000 city employes - either nonunion or
covered by other union contracts - refused to cross picket lines
at 200 buildings throughout the city.,.
This refusal resulted in the complete shutdown of the city's
streetcars, buses and cablecars, whose drivers are covered by a
separate contract.
The unions said one of their key demands was restoration of
the increment system, which the Board of Supervisors did not include
in the new salary increase ordinance adopted Monday night. This
system provided automatic 5 per cent annual raises to new employes
for four years.
EXPO '70, Asia's first World's Fair, is scheduled to officially
open today in Osaka, Japan.
Seventy-seven nations and 33 Japanese industrial firms- a1
record number for any world exposition-have erected pavilions on
the site. There also are structures housing the exhibits of several1
American states and Canadian provinces, the United Nations and1
other international organizations.
Emperor Hirohito and 2,000 invited guests will attend the opening.'
The six-month extravaganza, which already has cost the Japan-
ese $2.7-billion to stage, will open to the public tomorrow when up-
ward of half a million Japanese are expected to visit the compact
grounds in the Senri Hills.
No work of art at the exposition has aroused more comment than
the three-faced theme sculpture by Japanese artist Taro Okamotot
which towers over the roof of the theme area. Looming high in thet
night sky, two beams of light shoot from the eyes of the topmost face,
prompting one man to liken it to Godzilla, one of the horror monstersa
of the Japanese movies.
The Japanese public is not likely to be so critical. To many itt
will evoke memories of Haniwa, the primitive Japanese sculpturet
of the past.'

Senate
passes
vote billU
WASHINGTON -M- The
Senate yesterday passed, 64 to
12, a voting-rights bill which
extends the 1965 Voting
Rights Act f o r another five
years and lowers the voting
age to 18 in all elections after
Jan. 1, 1971.
The Senate bill now goes to the
House, which could accept it or
direct the appointment of con-
ferees to try to work out a com-
promise.
The 1965 Voting Rights A c t
was designed primarily to prevent
discrimination against blacks in
the Southern states.
The Nixon administration re-
quested and the House narrowly
approved last December a bill that
would treat all states alike.
Senate opposition to the admin-
istration bill centered around the
elimination of a requirement that
the states covered get prior ap-
proval from the attorney general
of any changes in election laws.
The Nixon bill would substitute
for this provision authority for
the attorney general to b r i n g
court action against changes
which he felt were discriminatory.
Civil rights forces argued that
this would open the way for many
new bars to registration of blacks.
House Democratic leader Carl
Albert of Oklahoma, questioned
at a news conference, said per-
sonally he supports the Senate
proposal to permit 18-year-olds to
vote.
Rep. Lloyd Meeds (D-Wash),
who said he long has backed low-
ering the voting age, said "I hope
it is constitutional."
There was no vocal opposition
in the Senate to lowering the vot-
ing age but many senators argued
it could be done legally only by a
constitutional ame n d men tor
state-by-state action. They said
t h e 1972 presidential election
could be thrown i n t o hopeless
confusion if the law extending the
franchise were ruled out by the
courts.

-Daily-Jim Diehl

New lights for police security at City Hall

Security tightened at City Hall
in response to recent bombings

adults-$1.50
child-75cj

frY- PTH POI'UM
PRIW~I7 AVUNUU AT LMESY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
INFORMATION 761.3700

not continuous
with
"Downhill Racer"

By BILL ALTERMAN,
In response to recent acts of
violence directed at government
buildings here and around t h e
nation, the city has established
tighter security regulations f o r
City Hall.
The .measures, which Police Chief
Walter Krasny says are mainly
designed to prevent bombings, in-
clude:
-Locking all but one set of
doors to City Hall;
-Increasing the number of foot
patrolmen in the City Hall area;
-Installing floodlights- on t h e
concourse outside the City Coun-
cil chambers;
-Requiring people who come in-
to the building after 5 p.m. to sign
in at the lobby desk, which is
manned by a police officer; and
-Locking all floors in the eve-
ning.
The security measures at City
Hall were first tightened t h r e e
weeks ago following the clash be-
tween police and demonstrators
protesting the verdicts in the Chi-
cago 7 conspiracy trial. Before.
the clash, some of the demon-
strators had smashed windows of
businesses and thrown rocks at
police cars parked outside City
Hall.
According to Krasny, there have
been no bomb threats against the
building. However, the p o 1i c e
chief cited the recent bomb inci-
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
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Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
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mail.

dents in Chicago and Detroit as
evidence of a need for precaution.
Around the country, bombings
have been on the upsurge for the
past year.
In Seattle for instance, there
were 32 bombings in the last year,
with more than two-thirds of them
coming in the last four months.
courthouse where Brown was ori-
ginally set to be tried.
Thursday, three New York sky-
scrapers were rocked by explos-
ions in the early morning.
According to police, most of the
recent bombing attempts - not

necessarily the ones mentioned
above - have been caused by
youthful left-wing militants.
The strict sign-in regulations at
City Hall may, in Krasny's words,
"cause a little more inconven-
ience" for several groups that meet
in the building after 5:00 p.m.
and for city employees who some-
times return in the evening to
finish up work.
However, he points out that be-
fore the regulations were impos-
ed, numerous unauthorized per-
sons wandered through the build-
ings at night.

ENACT workshop generates
debate on 'ecology and ethics'

By LYNN WEINER
"You must begin -- and this is
real ecology - to take control of
your own lives," said Murray
Bookchin, author of Ecology and
Revolutionary Thought, to the
over 250 people who crowded into
Canterbury House yesterday.
Bookchin spoke during an EN-
ACT teach-in workshop on Amer-
ican ethics and ecology, along with
Rep. Paul McClosky (R-Calif),
and history Prof. Robert Sklar.
"Ecology is an entire outlook,"
Bookchin said, "and our society
does not embrace that outlook in
its ethic. -
"The current American ethic,"
he explained, "is based on splits
-such as between town. and coun-
try-and hierarchies such as in
government.
"Unless we reject and transcend
this ethic for one which is based

not on splits but on integrations,
we are lost."
By accepting the authority of
the government, Bookchin add-
ed, "people consent to be dom-
inated." And this is contrary, he
said, to the non-departmentalized
framework of nature.
"One way to achieve both eco-
logical and humanistic ends," he
continued, "would be the decentral-
ization of cities and governments
into small, free communities tail-
ored to the ecosystem."
"The problem with ethics in
terms of change," Sklar told the
audience, "is that most Ameri-
cans are willing to consider n e w
ideas only when they're scared."
He questioned whether or not the
concern for the environment
could be maintained without the
pressure of fear.
McCloskey disagreed with Book-

chin's remarks, saying that gov-
ernments are necessary. "We're
all capable of evil,' 'he said, "and
so we have government to check
this evil."
He also debated with the aud-
ience on the value and the role of
the legislative process in Amer-
ica.
One student. rejected McClos-
ky's belief in the legislative sys-
tem. "It's just not true," he said,
people's attitudes are changed not
by government but by minority
pressure -- "by the people in to1e
streets."
McCloskey agreed that minority-
pressure changed majority opin-
ion but that the structure needs
time to respond to this pressure.
"And if you suggest that we have
no government," he said, "Y o u
mustj suggest a way to insure
peace."

1

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row.. STATE

SHOWS AT:

G}l)BBUIUOUSB
GOOD
NEWS
I1
4 n4
X {

1:00 - 3:00 - 5:00

Proqram lnf

Q: NO 2-6264 l7:00 and9:1o0p
NOMINATED FOR 7 ACADEMY AWARDS

p.m.

"BEST
PICTURE
OF THE YEAR I"
-National Board of Review
"BEST
ACTRESS-
JANE FONDAI"
-New York Film Critics

'

OiL AIIM ADRflD I M FTIIAI

1

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