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March 13, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

x -R

i

LAST TWO PERFORMANCES .
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS present
LIFE IS A DREAM
by CALDERON

page three

B

Sitil it~an

Ittit

NEWS PHONE: 764-055
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Friday, March 13, 1970

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

Trueblood Theatre, Frieze Bldg., 8:00 P.M.
Box Office open 12:30-8:00 P.M., 764-5387

I

I

the
news tOday
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

N. Y. skyscraper offices bombed

I

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
presents
"THREE DOG NIGHT"
SUNDAY, MARCH 22, 1970
8:30 P.M.
Bowen Fieldhouse, E.M.U., Ypsilanti, Mich.
Tickets: $3.50, $4.50, $5.50
Advance Tickets Available:, E.M.U. McKenny Union, M.S.U.
University Center, J.L. Hudson Co.
Mail Order: Send check or money order payable to E.M.U., Uni-
versity 'Activities Board, McKenny Union, Ypsilanti, Mich.

I

H. Y. Drama Critis'Circle Award 1968 -

SEASO 'S

OUR
THE
NEW
ROCK
MUSICAL

BE ST M USICAL
NEW tEST, FRESHESrT
IN A LOtNi T COMEDY"
"a CHEERF~1s ~
BLISSFUL,Y FUL 4&
MUSICAL IRREVNT
AS TOD r-AY SMODERN
-c ic a n s t ,

THE HOUSE POST OFFICE COMMITTEE approved a plan
to turn the postal system over to an independent corporation.
The proposed corporation would be government-owned but in-
dependently operated, similar to the Tennesee Valley Authority.
The corporation would set postal rates, negotiate pay increases
and benefits with postal unions, and borrow money for modernization
of its facilities.
The postal authority would be run by a 13-member executive
council composed of two senators, two House members, seven members
appointed by the President subject to Senate confirmation and the
authority's director general and deputy director general.
THE PENTAGON announced yesterday that it will halt pro-
duction of the trouble-plagued F-111 at less than a quarter
of the originally proposed number.
Gen. James Ferguson, head of the Air Force Systems Command,
said the Pentagon will spend no more money on F-111 production be-
yond the budget year which ends in mid-1972.
This means that only a total of 556 planes will have been pro-
duced. The original plan in March 1964, had been to produce 2,411
planes.
The F-111 series had once been conceived of as a way to
adapt one base plane to the needs of both the Air Force and
the Navy. The concept died however, when the Navy decided that
its version-the F-111B8--would have difficulty operating off carriers.
The Air Force has also been plagued with 13 crashes, most of
which have been traced to some structural defect.
PRESIDENT NIXON yesterday said he would appoint Curtis
Tarr to- succeed Lewis Hershey as Selective Service director.
Tarr, 45, who has been assistant secretary of the Air Force for
manpower and reserve affairs for the last nine months, said he
hopes to "serve the young people of America."
Before joining the Nixon administration, Tarr was president of
Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin, for six years. Before
that he served on the faculty of Stanford University..
While fielding newsmen's questions yesterday, Tarr commented
on the "March on Washington" last November saying, "It was cer-
tainly an expression by a substantial number of people whose feel-
ings certainly were sincere."
* * *

-Associated Press
THREE NEW YORK SKYSCRAPERS,, IBM, left, Mobil Oil, center, and General Telephone, right,
appear normal on the outside after bombs exploded yesterday in each building and caused ex-
tensive damage.

ofNEW YORK (M~ - A series
bomb blasts wrecked sky-
scraper offices of three of the
nation's corporate giants yes-
terday in a pattern similar to
an anti-establishment ven
detta of planted explosives last
summer and fall.
Becauseof anonymous forewarn-
ings, there were no injuries in the
latest bombings for which a self-
described revolutionary g r o u p
claimed credit. Phony threats emp-
tied other city buildings, as police
responded to 137 bomb scares
in the first 16 hours of the day.
In a rambling letter to the of-
fices of United Press International,
a group calling itself "Revolu-
tionary Force 9" took credit for
the early morning explosions that
wrecked the separate offices of
Mobil Oil Corp., the International
Business Machinese Corp., and the
General Telephone and Electronics
Corp. All three devices were plant-
ed in men's rooms and exploded
within a two minute period.
The letter accused the t h r e e
firms of profiteering from the war
in 'Vietnam and from "American
imperialism in all of the third
world."
4> Anonymous telephone calls wer
received in advance of the ex-
plosions, and night workers in the
target areas were evacuated.
The actual bombings were fol-
lowed by a rash of bomb hoaxes
naming as targets Litton Indus-
tries Corp. in Manhattan, federal
court buildings in Brooklyn and
Manhattan, the huge New York
Coliseum, Penn Central's rail
tunnel into Grand Central term-
inal, and the New York Times.
During evacuation of the federal
courthouse at Foley Square, Judge
Morris E. Lasket held court on
the building's front steps, dis-
missing a hung jury in a case in
progress in his courtroom. Amid
honking horns and other sounds of
passing traffic, his stenotypist
dutifully recorded the proceedings.
A similar series of bombings
last year occurred between July
and November. Bombs exploded
at a United Fruit Co. pier, the
Marine Midland Grace Trust Co.,
General Motors, RCA and Chase
Manhattan Bank skyscrapers, the
Criminal Courts building in down-
town Manhattan, a federal of-
fice building and an armed forc-
es induction center.

i

MARCH 18 - 19
ADVANCE TICKETS
PTP Ticket Office

CLAIMS ELECTION FRAUD:
College Republican insurgent
to seek injunction from CSJ

By W. E. SCHROCK
A liberal faction of the College
R bmihin~ (C!Rl b ditlr h

Order Your Daily .Now-
'.Phone 764-0558
HURRY!! TIMES
E NE EfK FOR ILLal MON-FRI
S375 No.,MAPLE RD.-7691300 7:00 and 9:00
SAT-SUN-1:30-3:20-5:10-7:00 and 9:00

THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT ordered Georgia and Florida
to submit plans for complete desegregation of their state college
and universities.
In letters dated Feb. 26 and disclosed yesterday, the Departm
of Health, Education and Welfare requested plans within 60 d
from Georgia and 120 days from Florida for complete desegregat
of their public higher education institutions.
If the states do not submit their plans, they may lose a combin
total of over $50 million in federal support.3
Both states have been told they operate racially identIfiable e
leges in violation of federal anti-discrimination laws.
For example, Florida has one state institution - Florida A&M
that is almost 100 per cent Negro, while the other six public univ
sities are virtually all-white.
In the past year, HEW has sent similar notices to Oklahon
Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Virginia, North Carolina, Maryla
and Pennsylvania.

K.P. LOVECRAFTS CLASSIC TALEoFTE.RROR M
flunwie Nonon
F:RI.--MARCH 13-11:30 p.m. ONLY'
TWO FEATURES-DOORS OPEN 11:00 p.m.
COLUM~IA PICTURES Presents
r. IBRYAN FORBES
PRODUCTION OF
WAYT THE
TREAT ~
WRONG BOX
AEAMAN COLOR
NOT CONTINUOUS WITH "DUNWICH HORROR"
FREE! SHRUNKEN HEADS

-

I I F -

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
presents
THE

nepu ncan ku) uu unaer the
a leadership of Keith Harwell, '71, a
Is CR member, asked Central Stu-
dent Judiciary yesterday to grant
ent a temporary injunction against
ays club chairman Michael Kunich,
Grad, and former chairman Glenn
Gilbert for alleged election irre-
gularities Wednesday night in vio-
ned lation of Student Government
Council rules.
col- Because of an upcoming state-
wide Michigan Federation of Col-
lege Republicans convention,
ver- Hartwell is asking for an injunc-
tion against the two because
ma, "there will be irrepairable damage
and if they are allowed to go to the
convention" given the current
- situation.
- The temporary injunction would
prevent the University CR club
from voting at the state conven-
tion, but more importantly, would
disqualify Gilbert for a state of-
fice.
Hartwell also hopes to be grant-
ed new elections.
The dispute lies between the,
supporters of the Hartwell and the
supporters of Kunich, the newly-
elected chairman.
Hartwell's followers say al-
though they are CR members
many of their number were not
allowed to vote in Wednesday's
election at the Union.
Former chairman Gilbert led
the Kunich supporters.
Kunich won the chairmanship
election 39 to 33 over Hartwell.
Both sides agree that procedure
calls for the list of voting mem-
bers to be only those members who
are listed as belonging to CR at
least two weeks prior to the elec-
tion and, further, have paid their
one dollar dues.
The Hartwell faction says that
the club's membership chairman
approved the list of nearly 80 new

members and noted that they had
paid their dues.
However, Kunich explains that
a membership list does not neces-
sarily constitute a voting list. He
further says although the mem-
bership chairman may have re-
ceived a list of the new members,
the dues which were claimed to
have been paid by the new mem-
bers were only shown to the mem-
bership chairman and not neces-
sarily passed on to the treasurer'
as they should have been. He said
Gilbert was correct in not allow-
ing the disputed list of people to
vote because "they had not paid
their dues."
On the other hand, Hartwell
said that his supporters had every

21 students arrested in WMU
clash on proposed constitution

right to vote, that their names
had been on file the proper length
of time, and their dues had been
paid.
However, at the election meet-
ing Gilbert ruled as chairman that
the disputed 80 could not vote and
that the voting list would be those
members who were on the old
membership list.
An attempt to overrule the
chair lost 43 to 33.
Michael Kunich on his astounding
victory and ask my votes to leave."
With the results of this election,
Gilbert says that "University of
Michigan becomes the last major
College Republican Club to come
under conservative control."

MARCH 25 thru 29
Trueblood Theatre
8:00 p.m. *

KALAMAZOO-Western Michi-
gan University was quiet yester-
day after rioting Wednesday af-
ternoon and evening which result-
ed in 21 arrests.
The demonstration began as a
rally in front of the student Un-
ion at noon to protest the school's
refusal to approve a new student
body constitution.
The constitution would have
given students m o r e control in
university affairs.
One WMU student, however,
said that the demonstrations had
"g o n e beyond the constitution"
and students were "taking o u t
their grievences against the uni-
versity."I
Western Michigan President
James Miller told t h e students
that their rally was permissable
so long as they stayed on the lawn
in front of the Union. However, if

they moved into the street, they
could be arrested.
When approximately 150 stu-
dents subsequently began to block
traffic in the street, Kalamazoo
city officials called city and coun-
ty police who eventually dispersed
the students with tear gas.
At 7:00 o'clock p.m. another
rally in the Union erupted into a
spree of window smashing in the
Union and one adjacent building.
City, county, and state police
were called back to campus and
made more arrests. Calm was re-
stored by midnight.
An early report placed the total
number of arrests at 26, however,
the Western Herald (student
newspaper ,at WMU) yesterday
gave the figure as 21.
Campus security police report-
ed $8,000 total damage during af-
ternoon and evening disruptions.

Half of the damage was from
broken windows. Other damage
was smashed furniture and build-
ing fixtures. There was also $500
in candy taken from a snack bar
and candy counter in the Union.
Pau Griffeth, a vice-president
pf WMU said the university would
not accept the constitution be-
cause it "abrogated the authority
of the president, the faculty and
the administration."
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
maid.

, .

W. C.,FELD
- v *
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY MATINEES ONLY
"THE BANK DICK"
1:45-4:15
"NEVER GIVE A SUCKER AN EVEN BREAK"
3:00-5:30

Box Office opens Monday, March 23 at 10 a.m.
Phone 764-5387

TICKETS - $2.00, $3.50

* Easter Sunday Performance ONLY AT 7 p.m.

I"'

mm-

-0

-

E

p

sum

SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:00- 5:00

Proqram I

e:: NO 2-6264 l 7:00 and 9:10
NOMINATED FOR 7 AADEMY AWARDS

p.m.

adults-$1.50
child-75c

{ Fy ITH-IFor'um1
FIFTH-AVNNU0 AT LI3UYPT
DOWNTOWN ANN AOR
INIJPOMATION 761-0700

not continuous
with
"Downhill Racer"

"BEST
PICTURE
OF THE TEAR!"
-National Board of Review

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10

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1 I

BEST
ACTRESS-
JANE FONDA!"F

3 NIGHTS

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RONNIF AND CIYDF

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An=

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