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March 12, 1970 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, March 12, 1970

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, March 12, 1970

D epartm-ent f rehitecture
Atr survival: building a future environment
once we have secured a future.
Thursdayarch 1
) 1:30 P.M.
) ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
) Editor of ENVIRONMENT FOR MAN;
ENVIRONMENT AND CHANGE;
and ENVIRONMEN T AND POLICY

TOMJANOVICH ERA ENDS
Michigan cagers end erratic year

4

By AL SHACKELFORD
A bittersweet basketball sea-
son came to an end for Michigan
last Saturday: bitter for the
team as a whole, which played
great ball all year long only
to finish at 10-14, but very sweet
for Rudy Tomjanovich, w h o
grabbed every honor in sight and
is now looking forward to ink-
ing a lucrative contract w i t h
some lucky pro team.
Tomjanovich dominated Wol-
verine basketball this year, tak-
ing game high scoring honors in
every game but two and coming
off the boards with more re-
bounds than any of his team-
mates in all but the Evansville
game, when he and Bill Frau-
mann each picked off 16 caroms.
"There's not too much you can
say about Rudy," says assistant
The Best of the
Underground-Film
Artists
Harry Smith
Early Abstractions s
Peter Kubelka,
Unsere Afrikanese
Bruce Conner,
A Movie
Stan Vanderbeek,
Phenomenon No. 1
Stan Brakhoge,
Blue Moses, Loving,
Wedlock House:
An Intercourse
SAT., MARCH 14, 1970
EAST QUAD 9:00 P.M.
NO CHARGE

coach Fred Snowden. "He did it
all for us and was a fine cap-
tain."
TOMJANOVICH FINISHED
the season with a scoring aver-
age of 30.1 points per game and
an average of 15.7 rebounds. He
led Michigan in almost every
major offensive category, and
finished an illustrious three-
year career as Michigan's lead-
ing rebounder and second high-
est scorer of all time.
Michigan started its season
way back on December 1 with a
rousing 85-75 victory over a
dissension-riddled (Harding-rid-
dled might be a better term)
Detroit squad, and then took to
'the road for games against two
of the nation's top teams:
Notre Dame and Davidson.
"We had the opportunity to
beat Notre Dame," recalls Snow-
den of Michigan's last-second
87-86 loss. "It was a jolting
setback for us and one of our
biggest disappointments of the
season."
A SIMILAR fate awaited the
unlucky Wolverines at Davidson,
where, according to Snowden,
"we played well but ran out of
gas," losing 91-85.
Returning home was s w e e t
tonic for Michigan ills, as they
hit their high-point of the sea-
son in knocking off an excellent
Marquette team 86-78. Thirty-
two points from Tomjanovich
and a great defensive job by the
Wolverines on Marquette star
Dean Meminger provided the key
to that exciting win.
Losses to Duke at home and

Utah on the road dropped the
Wolverines to 2-4 before they
tasted victory again at h o m e
over the Christmas vacation. A
smashing 105-65 orgy win over
weak Butler and an uplifting
upset win over Princeton sent
the Wolverines fired-up into the
Big Ten campaign.
"The win over Princeton was
one of the high points of
the season," says Snowden. The
Tigers came to Michigan after
almost toppling UCLA in the
Bruin classic.
TWENTY-FOUR point per-
formances by Richard Carter
and Dan Fife powered Michigan
past Northwestern and into
what Snowden calls "the k e y
game of our season." The Wol-
verines, a contender at that
time for conference honors, fac-
ed co-leader Purdue at t h e
Events Building.
A questionable traveling call
on guard Rick Bloodworth and
an overtime later, Michigan was
on the short end of a 103-96
loss. Snowden recalls the game:
"We thought we had them beat.
That game hurt us more than
any other; we were so high for
it that it took a lot out of the
team to lose. It was a tough job
to get them back up again."
OF PARTICULAR merit in
that game was the defensive job
done by Mark Henry on Purdue
gunner Rick Mount, Henry held
Mount scoreless for eleven
minutes, proving that the Le-
banon ace can be stopped.
The first Purdue game was in-
dicative of Michigan's season.
"The games we lost," says Snow-
den, "we lost yin the last 3 min-
utes or near the end of the
game. It was a characteristic of
the team: because they had to
put out 150 per cent every min-
ute of the game, our kids would
tire near the end of the .game.
Notre Dame, Davidson, Purdue
... all the same story."
MICHIGAN struggled through
the rest of their Big Ten sea-
son to finish at 5-9. A 95-87

1%

-Daily-Sara Krulwich
Rodney Ford (43)

win over contending Minnesota,
led by Tomjanovich's 37 points
and 24 rebounds, a win over the
upstate agricultural team (Mich-
igan State? Is that it?), and a
season-ending 108-99 walloping
of Indiana were the lone bright
spots for the Wolverines.
"OUR GUARDS did a fine
job," he says. "Danny Fife was
Mr. Hustle all year long; he
didn't have as good a scoring
year this year as he did last
year, but he was more valuable
to us." He praised Mark Henry
for his "sometimes superlative

I I

defense" and Rick Bloodworth
for his fine offensive play.
"I can't say enough of Rod-
ney Ford, a 6-4 pivot man,"
says Snowden. Ford averaged
14.5 points and 7.3 rebounds a
game despite his relatively small
size.
Of his forwards, Snowden
says, "In my estimation, Bird
Carter is the best 6-1 forward-in
the land, and Bill Fraumann
was the usual effective 100 per
cent basketball player." Frau-
mann was also praised for the
great influence he had during
the season on the underclass
players.
SNOWDEN calls Harry Hay-
ward and Wayne Grabiec "our
two most explosive threats com-
ing off the bench" and sees "a
great future" for both.
What Michigan's cagers lack-
ed in talent this year, they more
than made up for in deter-
mination and desire. Looking
back, fans will remember not
the team's 10-14 record, but the
brand of exciting fast-break bas-
ketball they played and they
-will remember Rudy.

4

Final 1969-70 basketball statistics

A

ce

Tomianovich
Ford
Fife
Carter
Henry
Bloodworth
Grabiec
Hayward
Fraumann
Hart
Anderson
Nicksic
Fishman
Magri

g
24
23
24
24
23
24
18
20
19,
10
4
3
2
1

fg-fga
286-604
133-304
126-291
125-252
52-127
57-140
38-66
23-50
12-24
3-9
0-4
1-5
1-2
0-0

Pct.
47.4
43.8
43.3
49.6
40.9
40.7
57.6
46.0
50.0
33.3
010
20.0
50.0
0.0

ft-fta
150-200
67-85
65-88'
56-93
33-48
19-28
6-9
6-14
12-22
2-2
4-6
0-1
0-0
0-0

Pet. rbs
75.0 376
78.8 169
73.9 142
60.2 92
68.8 41
67.9 27
66.7 50
42.9 38
54.5 52
100.0 6
66.7 4
0.0 3
0.0 0
0.0 0
136
70.5 1136
71.3 1225

Ave. Hi pf-d
15.7 24 75-1
7.3 11 , 59-0
5.9 11 90-5
3.8 13 61-1
1.8 6 79-7
1.1 5 X29-1
2.8 4 16-0
1.9 6 22-0
2.7 16 11-0
0.6 3 5-0
1.0, 3 2-0
1.0 2 1-0
0.0 0 3-0
0.0 0 1-0

tp
722
333
317
306
137
133
82
52
36
8
4
.2
2
0

Ave.
30.1
14.5
13.2
12.8
6.0
5.6
4.6
2.6
1.9
0.8
1.0
0.7
1.0
0.0

Hi
42
24
24
27
15
16
12
11
12
4
2
2
2
0

p

What career at RCA fits your talents ?

MICHIGAN 24
Opponents 24
RECORD; 10 wins,

857-1878 45.6 420-596
849-1842 46.1 421-592

47.3 74 454-15 2134 88.9 108
51.0 78 459-22 2119 87.9 117

14 losses (conference: 5-9)

B1oodrock
ROCK (the "hard" variety) IS A REFLECTION OF THE TIMES.
BLOODROCK is sirmply a clearer mirror than most.
A group of five musicians from Texas. Product of the times.

#i

h'

I

The above has been produced as a four-color
poster for display in stores. Courtesy of Bloodrock,
who. like the rest of us. remember the 60's. and

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