100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 12, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

W. C. FIELDS

page three

Q

£idtriioan

46F
ttiy

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

.. : +""
r
w{
'
< ,
'" ij
;

SAT. and SUN. MATINEES
"THE BANK DICK"
1:45 and 4:15
AND
"NEVER GIVE A SUCKER
AN EVEN BREAK"
3:00 and 5:30

Thursday, March 12, 1970

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

I

'I

news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
SEN. J. W. FULBRIGHT (D-Ark.) said he thinks it is ob-
vious a relationship exists in Laos between the Agency for In-
ternational Development and the Central Intelligence Agency.
The chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations committee made
this statement after Robert H. Nooster, an AID official testified be-
fore his committee.
Fulbright said he based his charge on published reports and
Nooster's failure to deny them.
Nooster agreed to show the committee a confidential memo on
the relationship of the CIA and AID in Laos.
* * *
REP. JOHN CONYERS (D-Mich) said there is a plan to
annihilate the Black Panthers.
Since the Chicago police killed Fred Hampton and Mark Clark,
Conyers and other Congressman have investigated police treatment
of the group.
From the 600 pages of statements the ad hoc congressional com-
mittee has gathered, Conyers said he was conviced the police had
initiated all encounters with the Panthers.
* * *
PRESIDENT NIXON announced a $30-million increase in
programs dealing with drug problems.
In the 1971 fiscal year that begins July 1, the administration
plans to increase funding for such programs from $105.8 million to
$135.5 million. In terms of the over-all budget, the increases were
small.
Funds for marijuana research will increase from $2.6 to $3.3
million. Dr. Stanley F. Yolles, director of the National Health In-
stitute of Mental Health, said federal researchers have learned mari-
juana hurts some people but have not decided if it is more dangerous
than alcohol,
TEN STATE REPRESENTATIVES introduced a resolution
calling for licensing newsmen and editors.
Rep. James Del Rio (D-Detroit) sponsored the resolution which
noted that other trades and professions are regulated and licensed
and said journalists should be no different.
The mass media are having an increasing effect on the lives of
citizens, according to the resolution, but people working in these fields
are not fully cognizant of their public duties or the accuracy of their
reporting.
Recently Del Rio has harshly criticized the press and broad-
casters. On Tuesday he called editors and reporters "faceless hatchet
men."

L

JJ

-Associated Press
MARYLAND REP. ROGERS C. B. MORTON, Gov. Marvin Mandel and Sen. Charles ,Mathias
examine the effects of an explosion yesterday in the county courthouse in Cambridge, Md. Black
leader H. Rapp Brown was once on trial inside this courthouse. Since then the trial has been moved
to Bel Air, Md.
Police begin to seek identifie
suspect in courhouse bombing

Buffalo
strike
goes on,
Acting president
to 'phase out'
police on campus
From Wire Ser ce Reports
BUFFALO - A student-faculty
strike at the State University of
New York at Buffalo entered its
second week yesterday with the
announcement by Acting President
Peter F. Regan that the 400 riot-
garbed police who have been on
campus since Sunday would' be
"phased out."
The force of city, campus, and
sheriffs police were requested on
campus by Regan to act in a "pre-
ventive fashion" to protect the
university community against van-
dalism. It was the physical pres-
ence of police that provoked the
Feb. 25 battle on campus which
culminated in 17 arrests, property
vandalism, and the call for a
strike.
The battle began after students
confronted. police following iso-
lated acts of vandalism which en-
sued after a peaceful demonstra-
tion. The demonstration was call-
ed by the Black Student Union to
protest athletic department policy
towards minority athletes.
At a university convocation
March 2 over 4,000 students over-
whelmingly approved removal of
ROTC from campus, open admis-
sions, removal of Dept. of Defense
projects, and removal of Regan.
A temporary restraining order
obtained by Regan became perma-
nent last Thursday when none of
the ten defendants named dis-
puted it.
Picket lines, building occupa-
tions, and mass meeting have oc-
curred all week, in violation of the
injunction. Regan suspended 20
students for violations of the in-
junction and other infractions of
university regulations dating back
to October.
The student strike committee
yesterday opened a liberation
school, 'which includes in the cur-
riculum classes on womens libera-
tion, the labor movement, and the
politics of education.
"Meanwhile, a peace patrol of
700 students and faculty members
are on the campus, wearing white
armbands and urging restraint
According to their leaders the pa-
trol intends to interpose itself
bodily between the police and stu-
dents in the event of trouble.
Also, the Faculty Senate met
yesterday to consider the issues
of the presence of police on cam-
pus and the possible resignation
of Regan. A resolution calling for
a vote of no confidence in Regan
was defeated, however.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104 Published daly Tues-
day thrcugh Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier. $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

CAMBRIDG
said yesterday
white woman
an explosion
where blackr
Brown was o
stand trial.

4
Mi

uumuiinuuuuA A

I1

LI

I

I

go
'44
Sso

d

Announcing our March Schedule'
All films in Aud. A, Angell Hall
75c
March 12, 13, 14-Thurs., Fri., Sat.
BONNIE AND CLYDE 7 & 9:30 P.M.
starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway
directed by Arthur Penn
March 20, 21-Fri., Sat.
DR. STRANGELOVE 7 & 9:30 P.M.
starring Peter Sellers, George C. Scott
directed by Stanley Kubrick
March 22-Sun.
GUNGA DIN 7 & 9:30 P.M.
starring Cary Grant, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr,
and Sam Jaffe as Gunga Din
March 27, 28--Fri:, Sat.
BEDAZZLED 7 & 9:30 P.M.
starring Dudley Moore, Raquel Welch
Sin and satire in English style
March 29-Sun.
REBECCA matinee-1 & 3, P.M.
starring Sir Laurence Olivier
dircted by Alfred Hitchcock
En April:'PETULIA, ROBIN HOOD, SALESMAN, FACES, LA
GUERRE EST FINIE
Watch the Daily for announcements of dates and times

MEMBERS OF THE SOVIET POLITBURO have challenged t Lt. Col. Thoi
the rule of Russia's leaders Lenoid I. Brezhnev and Alexi N. Maryland Stat
Kosygin. have a very g
Reports circulating in East European capitals say the rebels a possible nam
include Alexander Shelepin, a former chief of secret police and Kirill port involveds
Mazurov, deputy premier and Kosygin's right-hand man. observed in t
M r dup iafore it closed
SWEEPING REVISIONS of Britain's ,narcotics control law Meanwhile,
SWEEPNG *of an explosia
were proposed by Home Secretary James Callaghan. car at Bel A
The new law would crack down on smugglers and pushers and the courthous
distinguishes between addictive drugs such as heroin and less dan- tively identifi
gerods drugs such as marijuana. man Payne, a
Callaghan compromised with advocates of legalizing marijuana brown.
by proposing lower jail terms for marijuana offenses than for those Anothernr
ivligheroin. Featherstone,
involving hfied earlier as
Possession of marijuana would carry a maximum jail term of ed in the car
five years and an unlimited fine while possession of heroin would Brn ts on
carry a maximum penalty of seven years and an unlimited fine. Pres- arson, incitin
ent law provides a maximum prison sentence of ten years, a fine of arson, and to
$2,400 or both for possession of either marijuana or heroin. arose from a
NOW :SHO0W
:00-
JAIE _5:00*
9:10
NOMNAEDFQ
INCLUDING BEST SUPPORT
BEST DIRECTOR BEST ACTRESS GIG YOI
SIDNEY POLLACK JANE FONDA BEST SUPPORTII
SUSANNAH
WINNER.WIN
EST ACTRESS O
OF IE YEAR". O
-New York
Film Critics
-Nation
of Rev

E, Md. (P) -- Polic
they were seeking
in connection wit
at a courthou
militant H. Ra
nce scheduled t
mas S. Smith of th
te Police said, "W
ood description an
ne." He said the r
a person reported
the courthouse b
Tuesday.
the second victi
in that destroyed
ir 24 hours befo
e blast was tent
ed as William He
former associatec
own friend, Ralp
31, had been ident
the other man ki
Monday night.
trial for chargesc
g others to comm.
riot. The chargE
speech and subs(
S AT
3:00
- 7:00
P.M.
F9
ING ACTOR
UNG
NG ACTRESS
i YORK

ce
a
th
se
lp
to
he
Ve
id
e-
ly
e-
m
a
re
a-
r-
of

quent burning of a black section
of Cambridge in 1967.
The trial has been transferred
from Cambridge to Bel Air, Mary-
land. Preparations had started on
Monday but were delayed for a
week after the bombing Monday
night in Eel Air.
An official connected with the
Brown trial said he thought the

WASHINGTON (M)-Democratic Long
Leader Mike Mansfield's proposal after'
11- to lower the voting age to 18 was de
survived a key test, in the Senate ments
late yesterday after opponents Allen
of sharply challenged its constitu- In a
,es ' Bya 'ote of 62 to 21 the Senate plan,
e- defeated a motion of Sen. Russell tgchin
B. Long (D-La) to table and thus the 19(
kill the Montana senator's amend- endang
ment to a bill to extend the 1965 tion, a
Voting Rights Act. lot rig
The big margin by which the minori
tabling motion was rejected in-
dicated that the amendment will Man
be adopted when it can be brought the vo
to a vote. tions-
Opponents of Mansfield's pro- would
posal uniformly endorsed the ,vote estima
for 18-years-old but argued that young
it could not be constitutionally tions
brought about by congressional No s
action. ing th
The opposition contends only a of Ma
constitutional amendment or ac- that i
tion by states could legally change amend
the voting age, now generally 21. act of
"TERRIFIC!"
New York Times
"BRILLIANT!"
-Time Magazine
TAN1

g suddenly moved to table
a vote on the amendment
layed by a series of amend-
offered by Sen. James B.
(D-Ala).
addition to questioning the
tutionality of Mansfield's
oponents argued that at-
g it to the bill to extend
65 Voting Rights Act might
ger passage of that legisla-{
imed at protecting the bal-
ghts of blocks and other
ty , groups.
isfield's amendment to lower
ting' age to 18 in all elec-
federal, state and local,
extend the franchise to an
ted 10 million to 11 million
people beginning with elec-
after Jan. 1, 1971.
senator spoke against lower-
e voting age, but opponents
ansfield's proposal argued
t requires a constitutional
ment rather than just an
Congress.

Senate defeats delay
in voting age change

courthouse blast "directly relat-
ed" to the two deaths in the car
explosion.
William M. Kunstler, Brown's
lawyer, said he will seek dismis-
sal of the case when court reconr
venes Monday in Bel Air.
"It is absolutely and danger-
ously ridiculous to continue trials
like this. They are bound to pro-
voke people, white, or black."

INER
IT
l1URE
THE
I"
al Board
viw

"DELIGHTFUL!"
--New York Post
"FUNNY"
-The New Yorker

G

ZEV BUFMAN and DORT LOVE
YOUR OWN THING
a Ew rock aa l A
by HAL HESTER and DANNY AFOUINAR
Sones Cd by "Twelfh Nigh
Boole by
DONALD DRIVER
Music &oLyrim by
HAL HESTER and DANNY APOLINAR
Entire Production Staged By
DONALD DRIVER
MARCH 18--19'

"

/'

.~~~ FR ..r triU ANU AUM iq~It

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan